PDA

View Full Version : Help Winterizing a LT-1


mbpd312
11-12-2008, 08:55 PM
I was hoping someboay could help in the next few steps.. I am putting away the PS190 with LT1 for the winter. Questions I have are about the transmission cooler. Do I disconnect the top lines from the unit. As you can see I have one line off and I see red transmission fuild coming from line. Do I disconnect both and blow a little air up there? Or what are the proper step to make sure Im safe for an ohio winter. The second question is about the knock sensors. Do I remove both? Or just the starboard side? Thanks. As you can tell this is a new purchase for me

SkySkiSpokane
11-12-2008, 09:06 PM
Leave the transmission lines connected to the cooler. It is a closed system and you shouldn't have any water problems there. Just remove and drain the larger water lines. As far as the Knock sensor, you want to remove the starboard one to drain the block. I don't think that I have the other one (by the oil filter) but I will look. I have never done anything with it if I do. 12 years of Eastern Washington winters haven't had a problem. Make sure you pull the drain on the other side of the block too. Do you have your owners manual? I have a pdf copy for a '95 if you need it.

JimN
11-12-2008, 09:12 PM
There's only one knock sensor- the other side is either a plug, a petcock or a barb fitting to feed a shower or go to a heater.

Make sure the water rushes out of the block, remove the drain plugs from the exhaust manifolds, pull the hoses off of the raw water and circulating pumps and crank it over, so whatever water is in the pumps can exit.

Before all of this, if you haven't, add fuel stabilizer and run the motor so the stabilizer can go through the whole fuel system, change the oil/filter and check the rest of the winterizing list here at TMC.

mbpd312
11-12-2008, 09:22 PM
so I can hook up the top two transmission lines.. so when u say closed, its not closed loop cooling. I will remove the starboard knock sensor and the block t handle petcock on the port side.

TMCNo1
11-12-2008, 09:29 PM
Water does not run thru the transmission, transmission fluid in those lines run thru the transmission cooler to cool the fluid, shown here, 42088

bigmac
11-12-2008, 10:02 PM
Water does not run thru the transmission, transmission fluid in those lines run thru the transmission cooler to cool the fluid, shown here, 42088

Fascinating stuff No. 1

:D

TMCNo1
11-12-2008, 10:46 PM
Fascinating stuff No. 1

:D

I had to say something to accompany the picture!:uglyhamme

JLeuck64
11-13-2008, 12:02 PM
I was hoping someboay could help in the next few steps.. I am putting away the PS190 with LT1 for the winter. Questions I have are about the transmission cooler. Do I disconnect the top lines from the unit. As you can see I have one line off and I see red transmission fuild coming from line. Do I disconnect both and blow a little air up there? Or what are the proper step to make sure Im safe for an ohio winter. The second question is about the knock sensors. Do I remove both? Or just the starboard side? Thanks. As you can tell this is a new purchase for me

That's a picture of your oil pressure sending unit just above your oil filter, not a knock sensor.

TRBenj
11-13-2008, 04:01 PM
Leave the transmission lines connected to the cooler. It is a closed system and you shouldn't have any water problems there. Just remove and drain the larger water lines.
In case it wasnt clear, SkySki was referring to the transmission fluid lines being a closed system- that has nothing to do with the cooling system. He's correct that when youre told to remove the hose/hoses from the tranny cooler for winterization, that is in reference to the water lines. Those are the larger hoses on the cooler held on by hose clamps.

mbpd312
11-13-2008, 05:21 PM
thanks TRBenj, I did figure it out. I swear I got about a gallon of water out of that petcock and knock sensor drain. Im sure its bone dry now.

JimN
11-13-2008, 06:06 PM
thanks TRBenj, I did figure it out. I swear I got about a gallon of water out of that petcock and knock sensor drain. Im sure its bone dry now.

It holds more than a gallon, although some may have sloshed out through the exhaust when you moves the boat the last time. You pulled the hoses and plugs from the exhaust manifolds, right?

I would recommend leaving the plugs out and putting them in a plastic bag, tied to the steering wheel.

ncsone
11-13-2008, 06:15 PM
It holds more than a gallon, although some may have sloshed out through the exhaust when you moves the boat the last time. You pulled the hoses and plugs from the exhaust manifolds, right?

I would recommend leaving the plugs out and putting them in a plastic bag, tied to the steering wheel.
Jim- Why do you recommend leaving the plugs out for the winter? I noticed that the owner's manual for my boat says the same thing. If the block is drained, why would it matter? That puzzled me yesterday when I saw it in the manual, hoping you can shed some light on that.

JimN
11-13-2008, 07:00 PM
Jim- Why do you recommend leaving the plugs out for the winter? I noticed that the owner's manual for my boat says the same thing. If the block is drained, why would it matter? That puzzled me yesterday when I saw it in the manual, hoping you can shed some light on that.

Because you can't see if there's a clot of organic material in the water jacket that's keeping any remaining water from draining out and if the water seeps through toward the drain hole, it can drip out if the plugs are out. Also, if the water collects and does freeze, the drain hole can act as a pressure relief, to an extent. I worked for two MC dealers and everyone I know who works in the business leaves the plugs out because it keeps them from having to deal with cracked blocks in spring. Remember- water is one of the only things that expands when it freezes.

Why risk damaging the motor? If you're worried about forgetting to put them back in, make a list of what will be needed for summerization. There's no guarantee that all of the water came out.

Jerseydave
11-13-2008, 07:07 PM
Jim, I always do everything you said above but I re-install all the plugs and draw-in about 4 gals of -60 anti-freeze (purple) to help prevent rusting/scaling inside the block and heads.

Is this just a different school of thought? I've read that others on here do it that way also.
(about $30 for antifreeze is cheap insurance IMHO)

JimN
11-13-2008, 07:13 PM
NJ- if you have an LT-1, your heads are aluminum, which is specifically why we were told at MC training that this motor shouldn't get anti-freeze, some people's objections to that advice as "anecdotal", notwithstanding. MC and Indmar offered the warranty and I'm perfectly willing to believe that the reasons they gave are legit.

Jerseydave
11-13-2008, 07:21 PM
I understand, the LT-1 is unique with those alum. cyl heads. Makes sense.

So do you agree with my method for my MCX?

Ben
11-13-2008, 08:50 PM
I put the plugs back in too - I left them out one year & the exhaust manifolds got all rusty on the threads & I had to find a flat bottom tap to clean up the threads.

ncsone
11-13-2008, 08:54 PM
JimN - Your explanation makes sense - thanks for the info!

JimN
11-14-2008, 12:18 AM
MCX is OK with anti-freeze since it's cast iron. .

YooperScott
11-14-2008, 09:45 AM
I'm curious why is it exactly that an LT-1 cannot have anti-freeze put in it? Last I checked the 2 LT-1 powered cars I owned from GM had anti-freeze in their cooling system. They seemed to last.... Both our vehicles now are all aluminum, heads and block and they have antifreeze in them. I know that aluminum heads are prone to corrosion over time from old antifeeze where the corrosion inhibitors have been broken down but if someone fill and drained their engine with brand new antifreeze I fail to see where this hurts something?

That said I just remove the knock sensor and petcock (remove than simply open the valve in case something blocks the small hole in it) and leave them out along with the plugs on the manifolds. Remove all the hoses and start it up for a few seconds just for good measure. Really even if there were a little bit of water left inside I cannot see how it will hurt anything. Water expands slightly when it freezes but if it is mostly empty and there is somewhere for it to be able to expand it is not going to hurt anything. I'm not advocating intentionally leaving water in the motor but trying to help ease the minds of some whom may be nervous that 1 ounce of water somehow left inside is not going to hurt anything.

Scott
'95 LT-1 Prostar 190

JimN
11-14-2008, 09:53 AM
I'm curious why is it exactly that an LT-1 cannot have anti-freeze put in it? Last I checked the 2 LT-1 powered cars I owned from GM had anti-freeze in their cooling system. They seemed to last.... Both our vehicles now are all aluminum, heads and block and they have antifreeze in them. I know that aluminum heads are prone to corrosion over time from old antifeeze where the corrosion inhibitors have been broken down but if someone fill and drained their engine with brand new antifreeze I fail to see where this hurts something?

That said I just remove the knock sensor and petcock (remove than simply open the valve in case something blocks the small hole in it) and leave them out along with the plugs on the manifolds. Remove all the hoses and start it up for a few seconds just for good measure. Really even if there were a little bit of water left inside I cannot see how it will hurt anything. Water expands slightly when it freezes but if it is mostly empty and there is somewhere for it to be able to expand it is not going to hurt anything. I'm not advocating intentionally leaving water in the motor but trying to help ease the minds of some whom may be nervous that 1 ounce of water somehow left inside is not going to hurt anything.

Scott
'95 LT-1 Prostar 190

RV anti-freeze isn't the same as car anti-freeze, new or old. Using car anti-freeze in a raw water cooled motor means that some of it ends up in the lakes and rivers.

The way you describe draining, etc sounds fine. I was just trying to make sure people are very careful about draining it fully because a little extra vigilance beats having a cracked block that can't be covered by insurance.

YooperScott
11-14-2008, 11:00 AM
RV anti-freeze isn't the same as car anti-freeze, new or old. Using car anti-freeze in a raw water cooled motor means that some of it ends up in the lakes and rivers.

The way you describe draining, etc sounds fine. I was just trying to make sure people are very careful about draining it fully because a little extra vigilance beats having a cracked block that can't be covered by insurance.

I agree with extra vigilance in just about everything, just wanted to point out to people that if a drop of water were left they are not going to wind up with a trashed motor either.

Excellent point on RV anti-freeze and not wanting car anti-freeze going in the lake. I guess I never really thought about that as I don't use it.

Scott
'95 LT-1 Prostar 190