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jkski
11-12-2008, 08:54 AM
OK, mt first winter as a diesel owner is fast approaching and I am in need of some advice.
1) I have researched the fuel additives and am being told that Stanadyne Performance is the best thing to run not only to prevent gelling, but it should be run year round for better performance and maintenance? What do you think?

2) My 06 GMC Duramax has the option of running a "high-idle" that automatically kicks on when started in cold weather and shuts off as soon as the brake is depressed. So, is this a good thing to turn on or should it just be left off?

Thanks in advance for the education.

Skipper
11-12-2008, 09:09 AM
I have an '05 Duramax with the 6.6 liter diesel. My truck is pretty much a daily driver and hauls the Prostar to the pond and back (30 mins) except for an annual trek back to Lake Powell each summer.

I have never used additives. What I do ... is routinely replace the fuel filter about three times a year. I know that a dirty fuel filter will cause lots of problems.

jkski
11-12-2008, 09:12 AM
Thanks for the response and the tips. I am more concerned with the cold weather than anything, as the truck will spend a good bit of time pushing snow and hauling snowmobiles to the UP of Michigan where it will sit for several days.

Datdude
11-12-2008, 09:56 AM
I am on my second Duramax and my fourth diesel. I will say that the Duramax handles cold weather better than any of my other ones. My first Ford had to be plugged in under 30F or it would not start easily. The Dodge was a little better, but I still had to plug it in. Living in Northern Wisconsin and riding mostly in the U.P. my trucks have seen some pretty cold temps(-25F:cool:). I did use some anti-gel last winter when we had a stretch of sub zero temps and had good luck. I was using Power Service anti-gel or something similar. It is not expensive and I should probably get in the habit of using it all winter. My truck is in an uninsulated garage and I have never plugged it in (not sure where the plug is:rolleyes:). The Duramax must have some great glow plugs because even in really cold weather it is very quick (under 5 seconds). The high idle is a nice feature and I would leave it on during the cold months. My 2006 had it, but the 2007.5 I have now does not. It does use a lot of fuel, but helps warm it up faster. The other thing that helps is the front winter cover over the grille. This helps keep the engine warmer which should help mileage and heater performance in the cold temps.

WakePowell
11-12-2008, 09:58 AM
I’ve owned diesel trucks for the past 12 years with many of those in Montana, Utah and Colorado. I have never used any additives and never had any issues with gelling. Typically fuel suppliers will adjust their blend to account for the winter season.

The truckers that are able to carry large fuel supplies can get into issues when the take fuel from a warmer area and drive into a really cold area. This is why they sell additives in my opinion.

jkski
11-12-2008, 10:02 AM
You guys are a wealth of knowledge and I appreciate the help. Thanks.

sdesmond
11-12-2008, 10:07 AM
Typically fuel suppliers will adjust their blend to account for the winter season.

Yes. Im pretty sure they add Kerosene to the Diesel in the winter. Usually about 5%.

Datdude
11-12-2008, 10:08 AM
Iíve owned diesel trucks for the past 12 years with many of those in Montana, Utah and Colorado. I have never used any additives and never had any issues with gelling. Typically fuel suppliers will adjust their blend to account for the winter season.

The truckers that are able to carry large fuel supplies can get into issues when the take fuel from a warmer area and drive into a really cold area. This is why they sell additives in my opinion.


I would agree for the most part. Most stations around here use a "winter blend" but the local Citgo stations do not. Some places have a sticker on the pump saying if it is winter fuel, but some don't. Not getting the right fuel could cause problems, so I would say if you are worried about it to use additive with every tank. I have also heard that people in IL have problems because a lot of stations are using B5 Biodiesel and it seems to gel more.

Datdude
11-12-2008, 10:25 AM
I just read on www.dieselplace.com that using the winter cover may affect the temp sensors for the mirror (outside temp) and climate control. Apparently you have to move the two sensors to make sure they have access to outside air and not the air temp in the engine compartment. I was going to install mine this year, but may leave it off after reading that info:rolleyes::confused:

SkiDog
11-12-2008, 10:45 AM
Move SOUTh, and you won't have to worry about it!:D:D:D:D

Datdude
11-12-2008, 04:41 PM
Move SOUTh, and you won't have to worry about it!:D:D

Why would you want to do that?:confused::cool:

Maristar210
11-12-2008, 06:41 PM
Why would you want to do that?:confused::cool:

No ****. Buncha damn kooks in Brunswick Ga.

ProTour X9
11-12-2008, 06:45 PM
Not to mention the annoying accent......

SkiDog
11-12-2008, 06:48 PM
No ****. Buncha damn kooks in Brunswick Ga.

Easy there Ayatola Kromeni!

dog paw
11-12-2008, 08:18 PM
If memory serves I beleive the GM block heaters on the newer DMax are thermostaticly controlled and will not even turn on till it drops to some ungodly cold temp.

I have never used a additive in ANY diesel I have owned. My brother on the other hand is a snake oil sucker, and he can tell you the names of all the worthy diesel techs in the tri state area......

LOL! My neighbors love the cold weather idle up @ 6am. The old Powersroke's starter make more noise than the soft girly purr of the new DMax's :)

Lucky
11-12-2008, 09:24 PM
I have 2 german diesels in north central Wisconsin. I use Power Service when the temps drop sub-zero. Most diesel fuel is treated, but in low volume stations, you never know what was in the tank before. Thawing gelled fuel is the pits so a little "snake oil" is worth it to me. The high idle is to help keep some of the components such as the EGR valve from sooting up since diesels are cool running engines. If you start your diesel in the winter and let it idle normally, it basically will never warm up. My van has an aux diesel fired heater to help the engine warm up in the winter. I for one will keep using Power Service and carry Diesel 911 in each vehicle. Just my opinion.

Bob
88 TriStar

6ballsisall
11-12-2008, 10:37 PM
JK, you'll have winter blend up in Ohio if they don't already have it up there. You should not need to add additives at all for cold weather conditions. If you want extra Lubricity I've always liked Power Service.

wakolman
11-12-2008, 10:58 PM
I have an insulated attached garage, so the truck never spent the night outside. Never left me stranded once in the 2 winters in WI that I had mine. Didn't use any additives, and the factory grill cover was still in the bag! Cold starts shouldn't be a problem with the Duramax.

Datdude
11-13-2008, 12:18 PM
I have 2 german diesels in north central Wisconsin.


Where in North Central Wisconsin are you?

If memory serves I beleive the GM block heaters on the newer DMax are thermostaticly controlled and will not even turn on till it drops to some ungodly cold temp.


LOL! My neighbors love the cold weather idle up @ 6am. The old Powersroke's starter make more noise than the soft girly purr of the new DMax's :)

I think you are right about the block heater. People were using it above 20F and it was setting off engine trouble codes.

I miss the old rattle of the 7.3L PSD warming up in the winter. Back when a diesel sounded like a diesel.:cool: My 05 5.9L Cummins sounded nice too, but I have grown to love the quiet Duramax LMM

stuartmcnair
11-13-2008, 03:34 PM
Gelling is not the main reason to use the additives year round. When ULSD fuel became the requirement the removal of the sulfur also removed some of the lubricating properties of the fuel so the additives restore the lubricity to the fuel. I use the Stanadyne in every tank as it has the highest lubricity rating and cetane boost of all the additives that are readily available. Most diesel engine manufacturers recommend additives for lubricity as it keeps the injectors from having problems with the ULSD fuel. I run off road diesel in my tractor which is not ULSD and I do not add anything to it except for the PS Anti-Gel in the winter.

Footin
11-13-2008, 06:41 PM
Jeff, just move down to C-bus, it is much warmer than Copley.

tommcat
11-13-2008, 10:17 PM
you should use a fuel treatment/anti gel every tank during cold weather and in the summer you should be using a cetane boost fuel additive. make sure they dont contain any alcohol.
stanadyne and power service are 2 of the best.

the cetane boost has been worth approx 2 MPG consistently on my customers vehicles and my own personal trucks.

Lucky
11-14-2008, 09:22 PM
Where in North Central Wisconsin are you?



I think you are right about the block heater. People were using it above 20F and it was setting off engine trouble codes.

I miss the old rattle of the 7.3L PSD warming up in the winter. Back when a diesel sounded like a diesel.:cool: My 05 5.9L Cummins sounded nice too, but I have grown to love the quiet Duramax LMM
I am south of Wisconsin Rapids On Lake Camelot and Lake Sherwood.