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Bruce Carr
11-03-2008, 01:51 PM
I am going to re-do the upholstery on the '83 S&S this winter. What is the best material to replace the plywood seat bottoms? Pressure treated plywood? Exterior plywood coated with epoxy resin? Other?

Thanks

Upper Michigan Prostar190
11-03-2008, 07:56 PM
Check with Freddy.

Slinkyredfoot
11-03-2008, 08:03 PM
Check with Freddy.

Who the h is Freddy?

Upper Michigan Prostar190
11-03-2008, 08:07 PM
Who the h is Freddy?

he is a friend of Ric's. he knows alot.

85S&S_Keuka
11-03-2008, 08:51 PM
I am going to re-do the upholstery on the '83 S&S this winter. What is the best material to replace the plywood seat bottoms? Pressure treated plywood? Exterior plywood coated with epoxy resin? Other?

Thanks

I redid mine a few years ago and just used exterior plywood and painted it with primer. I figured the originals lasted 20+ years, so these should too.

454Prostar190
11-04-2008, 02:08 PM
I just did my rear seat this past season and used a piece of "marine" plywood. The original had some 1" holes drilled in a few places and I assumed that they were for drainage if the seat ever got real wet. I just copied what I had and water sealed the wood before I had it re-upholstered.

Upper Michigan Prostar190
11-04-2008, 02:11 PM
Did you guys get ahold of Freddy?

M-Funf
11-04-2008, 02:16 PM
Marine Plywood is the best choice. You should be able to get it locally.

mlay
11-04-2008, 04:08 PM
I am going to re-do the upholstery on the '83 S&S this winter. What is the best material to replace the plywood seat bottoms? Pressure treated plywood? Exterior plywood coated with epoxy resin? Other?

Thanks

I did my '82 last year and did the exterior plywood coated with the resin and it seems to be holding up fine. The guy at the upholstery shop was actually impressed with it.

Bruce Carr
11-05-2008, 01:45 PM
Thanks for the replies! What is the difference between "marine" plywood and exterior grade plywood? I would assume both have waterproof glues, maybe the marine grade has less imperfections/voids which would not be an issue in this case.

TMCNo1
11-05-2008, 02:01 PM
Thanks for the replies! What is the difference between "marine" plywood and exterior grade plywood? I would assume both have waterproof glues, maybe the marine grade has less imperfections/voids which would not be an issue in this case.

Google/Yahoo/Mywebsearch,
Marine Plywood, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_plywood
Plywood in general, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plywood (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plywood)
and http://www.answers.com/topic/plywood

454Prostar190
11-05-2008, 02:24 PM
Thanks for the replies! What is the difference between "marine" plywood and exterior grade plywood? I would assume both have waterproof glues, maybe the marine grade has less imperfections/voids which would not be an issue in this case.

The links that TMC#1 sent are pretty good. I paid $72. for a sheet of 5/8" Marine Plywood and that was my contractor price. I probably could have gone a different route but, it seemed like a good idea at the time..... and I didn't look at the price on the invoice until it was all cut up!:(

Kevin 89MC
11-05-2008, 03:30 PM
Thanks for the replies! What is the difference between "marine" plywood and exterior grade plywood? I would assume both have waterproof glues, maybe the marine grade has less imperfections/voids which would not be an issue in this case.

I was told by my local specialty lumberyard (where I could actually get marine grade plywood) that the marine grade does use a special glue that has much better resistance to repeated exposure to water, where exterior grade plywood does not use nearly as good of an adhesive.

The guy certainly did seem to know a lot about wood, and TMC's links seem to back it up somewhat. I have left a scrap piece of "exterior" plywood outside for a year just to see, and it did appear to start to delaminate.

I did buy a half sheet of 1/4 marine grade for my driver's seat bottom, and it held up great for 1 season. Time will tell . . .
Kevin

Freddy
11-06-2008, 01:55 AM
Marine grade would be the best choice. In construction, marine plywood is a specially treated plywood that is designed to resist rotting in a high-moisture environment. Marine plywood is frequently used in the construction of docks and boats