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russlars
10-21-2008, 03:00 PM
Can someone please explain to me how to properly grease bearing buddies? I am never sure how much to put into them.:confused: Also, are there any particular things to watch out for to make sure that they are functioning properly. I really would like to avoid a bearing failure, been there and done that (on another trailer).

Sodar
10-21-2008, 03:08 PM
Depends which bearing buddies you have. The first variety has a blue center that will come out when you load them with grease... once they have fully extended, the hub and bearing is full.

The second has no blue and you just need to watch for grease to pop out a bit around the edges and you know it is full.

The best thing to do to prevent bearing failure is to check the seals at the back of the hub for leaks. If you have drum brakes, it makes it more difficult to check and you could lose all the grease out the back of the hub and not even know.

It is also good to pull your hub apart every few years and clean out all the water/debris filled grease. Pack the bearings by hand, re-assemble and load them with new grease.

Also, on longer trips, stop every hour or so and see if the hub is hot. Even at full speeds, with braking, you should be able to hold your hand on the hub.

h2oskifreak
10-21-2008, 03:35 PM
A little less grease is better than too much. If you over do it you will blow a seal and the grease will ruin the brake pads. Kinda expensive and totally aviodable. I usually only grease mine once a year and do so very sparingly. If you have the kind that the plate comes forward, don't push it all the way out, just get it to move a little toward you and you will be sure to not over do it.

bkblaida
10-21-2008, 04:08 PM
Several years ago I replaced my Bearing Buddies with a product from Austrailia called Durahub. This is an oil filled system that eliminated the need for annual cleaning, carrying a grease gun blowing out seals from over filling etc. This system is superior to any other I looked at because it has a pressure equalization valve, is made from stainless steel and has a thick sight glass that is recessed to avoid cracking if you accidently hit the unit. We have put over 10,000 miles on the system with no problems. Before a trip you check the sight glass and as long as you see the oil you are free to go.
Cost was $120.00 for both wheels and the kit contained everything needed to make the conversion. Google Durahub or do a thread search for more information.
Others wrote in the past about the problems with oil bearing systems. It sounds like some systems have design problems. However 2 years and a lot of miles behind us and I have had no problems with the Durahub system. I will also add I never had any problems with the traditional grease system I just got tired of the mess.

Muttley
10-21-2008, 05:11 PM
Mine have a small hole in the side. I fill them up until grease starts to come out.

Other than making sure the BB is secure in the hub (not crooked and inserted all the way) and checking the inside for leaks, that's about it.

Like Sodar said, every stop I touch the hub.

TMCNo1
10-21-2008, 05:23 PM
This thread will contain some good info, http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=26598&highlight=bearing+Buddies

russlars
10-21-2008, 10:09 PM
A little less grease is better than too much. If you over do it you will blow a seal and the grease will ruin the brake pads. Kinda expensive and totally aviodable. I usually only grease mine once a year and do so very sparingly. If you have the kind that the plate comes forward, don't push it all the way out, just get it to move a little toward you and you will be sure to not over do it.
Blowing out the back seals is my biggest concern also, followed by my other concern of not getting enough grease in there to do the job. I know this depends on the grease gun, but I put about 10 pumps in each of my bearings the other day and the spring thing didn't even budge. Is it normal to have it take that much grease?

TMCNo1
10-21-2008, 10:39 PM
Blowing out the back seals is my biggest concern also, followed by my other concern of not getting enough grease in there to do the job. I know this depends on the grease gun, but I put about 10 pumps in each of my bearings the other day and the spring thing didn't even budge. Is it normal to have it take that much grease?


No, not if the hub was starved for grease. If you have any of the styles of piston bearing protectors, then the seal is designed to take the pressure for the piston to push out a bit during filling and during towing as the grease repeatedly expands and contracts from the heat and the cooling down of the grease. Always check and add grease after the first trip towing as low as yours appears to be, since there will be some air that will escape during towing the first time and grease may need to be added due to the air loss..