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View Full Version : Help, Sta-bil stained my Mastercraft


DCLMastercraft
10-14-2008, 09:13 PM
I was winterizing my boat this evening and after putting Sta-bil in the gas tank I took the boat to the gas station. When I started slowly fueling the boat, sta-bil washed out all over the interior and the side of the boat. I immediately wiped it off but it has stained my beautiful interior. I have tried various interior cleaners and cannot get the ugly yellow stains off of the gray interior vinyl. Does anyone have any experience with removing a stain like this? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Gamble
10-15-2008, 12:14 AM
have you tried the starbrite vinyl cleaner/brightener? You can get it at Academy, if there's one near you. I used it today with good results.

bigmac
10-15-2008, 05:17 AM
If you're saying it stained your hull, then yes - an acid cleaner is appropriate, but I wouldn't use Starbite on your vinyl.

I doubt that stain is coming out, but you could try the usual cleaning techniques. No doubt it's stained the cloth backing on the vinyl. It may fade with time.

kjohnson
10-15-2008, 07:43 AM
Quick question. Why don't you recommend Starbrite for vinyl?

TMCNo1
10-15-2008, 07:48 AM
Quick question. Why don't you recommend Starbrite for vinyl?


I think he's referring to Starbrite Hull Cleaner, not Vinyl Cleaner

bigmac
10-15-2008, 07:58 AM
Quick question. Why don't you recommend Starbrite for vinyl?
'scuse me. At 4AM my brain read that as Starbrite Hull cleaner, which is oxalic acid. It will destroy the plasticizers in the vinyl as well as the protective coating. Not to mention what it would do the the stitching. Re-reading, I see he was talking about Starbrite Vinyl Cleaner. AFAIK, that cleaner is OK with G&T (the company that makes the vinyl) -- at least it's not on their list of disapproved products. I'd be more inclined to use their Z-Care product.

http://www.gtglobalproductsolutions.com/marine/imgs/products/zcare_bottle.jpg

Here's their cleaning guide: http://www.gtglobalproductsolutions.com/marine/vinyl_cleaning_guide.pdf

j2nh
10-15-2008, 08:40 AM
First I would call Stabil and see if they recommend a product. You can't be the first person this has happened to.

Then if none of the traditional cleaners work I would try mineral spirits. Years ago I purchased a new cover for my 190 and the blue dye in the fabric stained the white seats. The cover manufacturer suggested mineral spirits and it worked. Again, as you get more aggressive the chances of doing permanent damage to the vinyl increase.

If all of this fails then talk to your dealer or even a local car dealer and see about having the stain sprayed (dyed). I had a seat done once this way because of a stubborn rust stain and afterwards you couldn't find the spot if you tried.

Good luck and be sure to post back what works.

kjohnson
10-15-2008, 08:53 AM
I don't think I would try mineral spirits. It is a paint remover. It has to be bad for vinyl???????

j2nh
10-15-2008, 09:16 AM
I don't think I would try mineral spirits. It is a paint remover. It has to be bad for vinyl???????

I did it at the urging of the cover manufacturer and it worked. No long term damage to the vinyl, years later it looked the same as the rest of the interior.

Start conservative and work your way up to more aggressive solutions. We are talking about an unacceptable stain that has to come out or the vinyl has to be replaced.

TMCNo1
10-15-2008, 10:40 AM
I don't think I would try mineral spirits. It is a paint remover. It has to be bad for vinyl???????

Mineral Spirits/White spirit, also known as Stoddard solvent, is a paraffin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paraffin)-derived clear, transparent liquid which is a common organic solvent (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solvent) used in painting and decorating. In 1924, an Atlanta dry cleaner (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_cleaning) named W. J. Stoddard worked with Lloyd E. Jackson of the Mellon Research Institute to develop specifications for a less volatile dry cleaning solvent as an alternative to more volatile petroleum solvents. Dry cleaners began using it in 1928 and it was the predominant dry cleaning solvent in the United States from the late 1920s until the late 1950s.
It is a mixture of saturated aliphatic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aliphatic) and alicyclic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alicyclic) C7 to C12 hydrocarbons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrocarbon) with a maximum content of 25% of C7 to C12 alkyl (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkyl) aromatic hydrocarbons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aromatic_hydrocarbon).
White spirit is used as an extraction solvent, as a cleaning solvent, as a degreasing solvent and as a solvent in aerosols (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerosol_spray), paints (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paint), wood preservatives, lacquers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacquer), varnishes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varnish), and asphalt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asphalt) products. In western Europe about 60% of the total white spirit consumption is used in paints, lacquers and varnishes. White spirit is the most widely used solvent in the paint industry. In households, white spirit is commonly used to clean paint brushes after decorating. Its paint thinning properties enable brushes to be properly cleaned (by preventing the paint from hardening and ruining the bristles) and therefore enabling them to be re-used.
Three different types and three different grades of white spirit exist. The type refers to whether the solvent has been subjected to hydrodesulfurization (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrodesulfurization) (removal of sulfur) alone (type 1), solvent extraction (type 2) or hydrogenation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogenation) (type 3). Each type comprises three different grades: low flash grade, regular grade, and high flash grade. The grade is determined by the crude oil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crude_oil) used as the starting material and the conditions of distillation.
In addition there is type 0, which is defined as distillation fraction with no further treatment, consisting predominantly of saturated C9 to C12 hydrocarbons with a boiling range of 140-200 C.




Believe me, after using it for nearly 40 years in the sign/pinstriping business Mineral Spirits won't remove paint once it has dried, only works for cleanup and paint thinning. I have used it on plastic, vinyl, cloth and leather vehicle interiors as a cleaning agent for ink stains among others, for as long as I've been painting with no ill effects.

DCLMastercraft
10-15-2008, 04:52 PM
Thank you to everyone on the list that responded for the great suggestions. I tried the mineral spirits after testing it on a hidden piece and it helped, however it did not get the stain out entirely. I think that I will call Stabil and see what they say. I will let you know what I find out.

Thanks again.

DCLMastercraft
10-15-2008, 04:54 PM
I just looked at the Stabil website and found the following information that I did not see yesterday:

If spilled immediately blot-up STA-BIL Fuel Stabilizer with a paper towel. If a stain remains, moisten a paper towel with mineral spirits (common paint thinner) or dry cleaning fluid available at most hardware stores and home centers. Test for color fastness then place moistened towel on the stained area for 30 seconds -- this may be repeated twice. Rinse area with isopropanol (common rubbing alcohol).

I will have to give this a try this evening.

JohnE
10-15-2008, 07:07 PM
Mineral Spirits/White spirit, also known as Stoddard solvent, is a paraffin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paraffin)-derived clear, transparent liquid which is a common organic solvent (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solvent) used in painting and decorating. In 1924, an Atlanta dry cleaner (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_cleaning) named W. J. Stoddard worked with Lloyd E. Jackson of the Mellon Research Institute to develop specifications for a less volatile dry cleaning solvent as an alternative to more volatile petroleum solvents. Dry cleaners began using it in 1928 and it was the predominant dry cleaning solvent in the United States from the late 1920s until the late 1950s.
It is a mixture of saturated aliphatic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aliphatic) and alicyclic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alicyclic) C7 to C12 hydrocarbons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrocarbon) with a maximum content of 25% of C7 to C12 alkyl (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkyl) aromatic hydrocarbons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aromatic_hydrocarbon).
White spirit is used as an extraction solvent, as a cleaning solvent, as a degreasing solvent and as a solvent in aerosols (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerosol_spray), paints (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paint), wood preservatives, lacquers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacquer), varnishes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varnish), and asphalt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asphalt) products. In western Europe about 60% of the total white spirit consumption is used in paints, lacquers and varnishes. White spirit is the most widely used solvent in the paint industry. In households, white spirit is commonly used to clean paint brushes after decorating. Its paint thinning properties enable brushes to be properly cleaned (by preventing the paint from hardening and ruining the bristles) and therefore enabling them to be re-used.
Three different types and three different grades of white spirit exist. The type refers to whether the solvent has been subjected to hydrodesulfurization (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrodesulfurization) (removal of sulfur) alone (type 1), solvent extraction (type 2) or hydrogenation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogenation) (type 3). Each type comprises three different grades: low flash grade, regular grade, and high flash grade. The grade is determined by the crude oil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crude_oil) used as the starting material and the conditions of distillation.
In addition there is type 0, which is defined as distillation fraction with no further treatment, consisting predominantly of saturated C9 to C12 hydrocarbons with a boiling range of 140-200 C.




Believe me, after using it for nearly 40 years in the sign/pinstriping business Mineral Spirits won't remove paint once it has dried, only works for cleanup and paint thinning. I have used it on plastic, vinyl, cloth and leather vehicle interiors as a cleaning agent for ink stains among others, for as long as I've been painting with no ill effects.



Damn, Harold....Why do you keep all this useful knowledge hidden among your crazy arse posts......?

We need a Harold Page "Serious uselfel info" thread.:D:cool::cool:

'Cause I thought I knew all your secrets....;)

TMCNo1
10-15-2008, 08:15 PM
Damn, Harold....Why do you keep all this useful knowledge hidden among your crazy arse posts......?

We need a Harold Page "Serious uselfel info" thread.:D:cool::cool:

'Cause I thought I knew all your secrets....;)


Google is your and my best friend! Copy, paste and submit!

JohnnyB
10-18-2008, 04:51 AM
I splashed some of the StaBil Marine for Ethanol Fuels (Blue stuff) on my seat this summer.....cleaned up using Babe's seat soap.