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mcdriver
05-03-2005, 08:33 AM
Anybody got tips for slow speed maneuvering for someone new to mastercrafts?? First attempt at loading on trailer resulted in being crossways. :confused:

Ski-A-Rees
05-03-2005, 08:46 AM
Just line in up from far away and load it slow. If your used to an outboard like I was it will be different. Everyone usually complains about not backing up straight but once on the trailer, you can still stear the rear end and line it up straight with the guide posts.

mcdriver
05-03-2005, 08:51 AM
How deep should the trailer be?

Farmer Ted
05-03-2005, 08:51 AM
Anybody got tips for slow speed maneuvering for someone new to mastercrafts?? First attempt at loading on trailer resulted in being crossways. :confused:

slow and easy

don't get into a hurry

if there are any rollers, waves, or jetskis wait until they leave

drop a bouy in the water and practic pulling up to it, it's like backing up a trailer someone can tell you how to do it all day long but the only way you'll get good at it is to just do it.

Farmer Ted
05-03-2005, 08:52 AM
How deep should the trailer be?

I've got a 190 and I keep the tops of the fenders out of the water, about 2 inches.

What kind of boat do you have?

mcdriver
05-03-2005, 08:58 AM
It is an X30

Ski-A-Rees
05-03-2005, 09:42 AM
I would have to agree with Farmer Ted and keep the fenders 2 inchs out of the water but It does differ by how steep the ramp is.

Jorski
05-03-2005, 09:59 AM
Use the boat's tendency to rotate to your advantage. Due to the rotation of the prop , the rear end of the boat wants swing to the driver's left in forward, and to the driver's right in reverse.

Since there is no water being sent over the rudder when in reverse these movements are not equal. Go out a small distance from your dock and play around by putting the boat into forward and reverse and get used to how it behaves. You want to be far enough away from your dock that you won't hit it, but close enough so that you have a fixed point of reference by which you can judge the magnitude of these movements.

Once you get used to these movements they can be used to great advantage. When docking at an angle you will get to know just how much reverse to use in order to pull the rear end into the dock. You can also get the boat to move almost sideways by going into forward and then reverse repeatedly in the right proportions.

It takes a while to master an inboard, but eventually it gets so that you wouldn't want any other type of boat.

Good luck !!!

tex
05-03-2005, 10:00 AM
give it more gas!

Diesel
05-03-2005, 11:10 AM
Like a good night..................use the in and out method. :D

I find in close quarters I am constantly in and out of gear. Just put it into gear for a second and then bring it out. You can use the rudder to pivot the boat in a circle using this method. Your X30 will be a little less manuverable but the same method should work.

When loading or docking I always leave my tail out to the left and bump it into reverse when approaching to snap it back in line and slow the momentum. From there you can bump it in and out and use the rudder to move the boat which ever way is neccessary. Most new owners use too much throttle and leave the boat in gear too long. As mentioned before take your time and it will come to you. Once you get good you will not want to drive anything else!! ;)

east tx skier
05-03-2005, 11:45 AM
Everything above is right on. Here's the same thing put a little differently and possibly some new stuff.

With trailering, give yourself a bit of distance and bring it in slow. Although it's not at all as difficult as putting a jet on an aircraft carrier, you might make that analogy. Like Diesel said, in and out of gear. If it's not in gear, it's not going to respond as much to your steering corrections. If it's in too long, you'll have some unwanted speed; you don't want to ram the trailer. At a certain point, you'll need to decide whether you've got it nailed or you need a go-around. Unfortunately, this point isn't very close to the trailer as you need a bit of room to maneuver these things what with the reverse torque and all. So if the ramp is flanked by piers, by the time the bow crosses the end of those piers, you need to know if you're lined up. If you are, go for it, in and out of gear, small steering corrections. If not, give it a little reverse to neutralize your motion, steer to the right and bump the boat into the forward gear to straighten out your nose thereby compensating for the reverse torque.

If you're lined up, then take it in. Once the tip of the bow crosses the guide poles, put it in neutral until you feel it settle on the bunks. Then gently give it the gas and put it the rest of the way on. the bunks will straighten you up a bit. It just takes practice. My wife got crosswise on the trailer and almost took out the dock when she tried to ram it in reverse to correct. She now backs the trailer like a pro.

For docking and dealing with fallen skiers. Rule one is to always keep the dock or the skier on the starboard (driver's side) of the boat. When approaching a dock, do so at around a 45 degree angle. When your bow gets within a few feet, apply reverse and the transom will swing in parallel to the dock. To move away from the dock, give the boat a push from the front and back if you have two people. If not, turn the wheel to the right and move forward just slightly so that your bow is angled toward the dock. That will give you a little room to back right. Repeat and you'll gradually be able to get away from the dock.

Tom023
05-03-2005, 11:57 AM
I also agree with all the above, and might add that wind and current can have an affect. I kind of gage the amount of drift that is occuring and line up, upwind a little bit so that as I enter the guideposts I am pretty much centered. It takes a little practice but after getting the feel it's second nature. Just another factor to keep in mind.

sfitzgerald351
05-03-2005, 12:04 PM
With loading onto the trailer just come in straight and slow until you gently bump the bunks. The in and out of gear method works well. Basically you float along in neutral until you need to either go forward or turn. If you turn the rudder and then give it a quick bump into gear you'll get the turn you need without much forward momentum. There is nothing to lose by going SLOW. Once you have the nose lined up between the sticks on the trailer use the rudder and in and out of gear to kick the stern so it's straight with the trailer. Then power up slightly to get the boat settled on the back of the trailer. Straighten the rudder, make sure nobody is standing in the way and then power up the rest of the trailer gently.

Ditto the comments to go spend a few hours practicing backing up and going forward near a dock. Most people are frustrated about how an inboard has a lack of steering as slow speeds. But once you understand what the boat is going to do you can use it to your advantage.

Give it a shot and don't hesitate to come back to ask more questions if things didn't make sense on the water.

Cloaked
05-03-2005, 05:13 PM
Like a good night..................use the in and out method. :D

I find in close quarters I am constantly in and out of gear. Just put it into gear for a second and then bring it out. You can use the rudder to pivot the boat in a circle using this method. Your X30 will be a little less manuverable but the same method should work.

When loading or docking I always leave my tail out to the left and bump it into reverse when approaching to snap it back in line and slow the momentum. From there you can bump it in and out and use the rudder to move the boat which ever way is neccessary. Most new owners use too much throttle and leave the boat in gear too long. As mentioned before take your time and it will come to you. Once you get good you will not want to drive anything else!! ;)Exactly what Diesel said. I use reverse as much (or more) as I do forward. Easy on the throttle, although I do hammer hard on reverse quite often. Just like having air brakes... :cool:

OhioProstar
05-03-2005, 05:30 PM
Watch out for waves coming in from other boats if your ramp isn't in a no wake area. One thing that always catches a new inboard owner off guard is how easy you can get sideways with a couple rollers. It takes a lot more forward momentum with a inboard to keep your tracking straight.Once you do it a couple hundred times you can use them to your advantage. I always load/unload the truck driver from my bow so I can have better control around the dock if it is rough.

DanC
05-03-2005, 05:34 PM
What a bunch of wussies!
Get someone to hold your beer :toast: , yell "watch this" :woohoo: , line 'er up and hammer the throttle :headbang: . If you miss the boat buddy you will have a good story for this board. :rant:

Leroy
05-03-2005, 05:34 PM
If you have cross wind try to bring the nose into the wind and turn on the boat at the last moment. Always bring the nose into the wind where possible.

6ballsisall
05-03-2005, 05:37 PM
[QUOTE=DanC]What a bunch of wussies!
Get someone to hold your beer :toast: , yell "watch this" , line 'er up and hammer the throttle :headbang: . If you miss the boat buddy you will have a good story for this board.


Note to self, never let DanC drive my boat :woohoo:

OhioProstar
05-03-2005, 05:45 PM
He can back the trailer down.

tex
05-03-2005, 05:45 PM
thread highjack-Doug-Willie Wonka reminds me of Michael Jackson! Anyone else have that feeling?

DanC
05-03-2005, 06:12 PM
He can back the trailer down.

Same technique

AirJunky
05-03-2005, 06:16 PM
Willie Wonka ought to remind you of Johnny Depp & Marilyn Manson! :headbang:

Great tips for someone who drives a Prostar guys. The X30 reacts so much slower it almost doesn't feel like an inboard. In fact, as I recall the stern does not pull to the starboard at all.... possibly very little though.

Thrall
05-03-2005, 06:20 PM
mcdriver,
I'll add my .02 to this. Come in to the trailer very slow, idling in gear is too fast (in my boat anyway). Take it in and out of gear, adjust steering when in gear, and slight steering only. If you have to overcorrect, go around and start again. Trailer depth in the water, can't help you w/ your specific rig, but back in and get the whole bunks wet first, will be easier to pull on.
When docking a DD, it is much easier to dock the starboard side to the pier, because reverse will automatically pull the rear of the boat to the starboard side. Come at the dock perpindicular to it and when getting close, turn left (port). In and out of gear to stay slow, and when a few feet away from the dock, at about a 45 deg angle to the dock, hit reverse a couple times and it will swing the rear of the boat around to the dock. Fwd and reverse a couple times at this point is usually necessary.

tpttool
05-03-2005, 06:28 PM
you guys doin all wrong. i like to git her up to about 20mile en hour. easy to keep striaght line. up the trialer she goes!

AirJunky
05-03-2005, 06:31 PM
Who is this? :confused:

east tx skier
05-04-2005, 01:25 PM
thread highjack-Doug-Willie Wonka reminds me of Michael Jackson! Anyone else have that feeling?

I resent that (not really). Mr. Wonka doesn't love them up. He just tortures them for being spoiled little sh|ts. Now what the oompa loompas do with them is anybody's guess.

"Where is fancy bread. In the heart or in the head?