PDA

View Full Version : Cornhole boards


kycat2007
09-27-2008, 01:16 PM
I know there are several sites and people selling them but I thought I would post what I know as must and then ask a question or two.

It seems the measurements are 2ft by 4ft. I am told that the 3/4 top is a must. Some people go cheaper and use 1/2 but they are not as good. I am told that the reinforcement 2x4 is needed in the center of the box. Actually I have heard it both ways yes and no.

I have seen some for sell for $125 a set with no reinforcement but they look pretty nice decent paint etc. I have seen some that are $75 with bad paint jobs but have reinforcement. Both are made with 3/4 tops.

I asked the cheaper guy how much he would sell me them for unpainted and he said $50.

There is a question on the bags that come with the set. The cheap guy makes his and the $125 buys his off web (and the are better bags). Now is it important that you use Birch plywood for the top?? I was wantng to stain the set I buy and make it look like a basketball court. I have heard that many coats of poly urethane are needed is this hard to do? Are the boards better painted and how slick should they be. I know there is forums out there on this stuff but I have to ask my family.:)

flipper
09-27-2008, 01:22 PM
If you're going to paint/stain it yourself, why not just make it?

JimN
09-27-2008, 01:44 PM
You can use whatever wood you want but if you really want the face to be stiff, 1/2" is fine if you either douple it up or reinforce it. You can buy a sheet of birch plywood for about $35 at Home Depot, but don't expect it to stay flat. If you really want it to be flat, cabinet grade birch plywood is needed and Rockler, The WoodWorking Store and many other places sell it. If you know someone who owns, works for, "knows a guy" at a cabinet shop, they should have scraps, if you really want to keep the price down. If you really want it to look like a basketball court, you could use a plywood backer and strips of hardwood, cut to scale and glued down with epoxy. The edges wouldn't chip as much as plywood, either, especially if you add a band around the perimeter.

As far as paint, if you want the grain to show, poly is fine and gloss finishes are harder than semi, satin and flat. If you use multiple coats of poly, make sure it doesn't dry completely before adding a coat- successive coats won't adhere and may even blister or lift completely. If you let it get tacky and then re-coat, it will bond better. If you use pigmented paint, use a clear sanding sealer, like Zinsser Bull's Eye, which is dewaxed shellac and this will allow you to build a few coats, sand smooth and then mask the areas you want painted. Lift the tape while it's still tacky and you'll have crisp edges, which can be feathered with fine sand paper when it's dry. Once the paint it dry, you can use clear poly over everything for more protection. really durable and dry relatively fast. Oil base is probably better and lacquer can be sanded smooth and rubbed out, if you want to really go overboard (think car paint and colors).

For pigmented finishes (paint), I have found that a good bristle brush works best and for clear, foam pads, which are really cheap. With either, slow deliberate strokes will minimize bubbles. Acrylic paints are

Whether you paint or use clear poly, preparation is always one of the most important parts of the project. It's not hard to do but when it comes to finishes, rushing to continue before it's completely dry will destroy a project. It'll dry when it dries. Low humidity and warm weather helps, though.

A great resource for info on woodworking and finishing is at http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/

Click on Community at the upper right and look around for finishing, woodworking techniques, etc.

jimmer2880
09-27-2008, 07:32 PM
so... what are cornhole boards?

flipper
09-27-2008, 07:40 PM
so... what are cornhole boards?

Cornhole board....now that's a long story.

Farmer Ted
09-27-2008, 08:03 PM
I know there are several sites and people selling them but I thought I would post what I know as must and then ask a question or two.

It seems the measurements are 2ft by 4ft. I am told that the 3/4 top is a must. Some people go cheaper and use 1/2 but they are not as good. I am told that the reinforcement 2x4 is needed in the center of the box. Actually I have heard it both ways yes and no.

I have seen some for sell for $125 a set with no reinforcement but they look pretty nice decent paint etc. I have seen some that are $75 with bad paint jobs but have reinforcement. Both are made with 3/4 tops.

I asked the cheaper guy how much he would sell me them for unpainted and he said $50.

There is a question on the bags that come with the set. The cheap guy makes his and the $125 buys his off web (and the are better bags). Now is it important that you use Birch plywood for the top?? I was wantng to stain the set I buy and make it look like a basketball court. I have heard that many coats of poly urethane are needed is this hard to do? Are the boards better painted and how slick should they be. I know there is forums out there on this stuff but I have to ask my family.:)

www.tailgategamers.com is one of my best clients

JimN
09-27-2008, 08:37 PM
Do they have anything for playing "Parking Lot Dice"?

TMCNo1
09-27-2008, 09:10 PM
so... what are cornhole boards?


I always heard it was like strip poker!:rolleyes::D

Cloaked
09-27-2008, 09:40 PM
I know there are several sites and people selling them but I thought I would post what I know as must and then ask a question or two.

It seems the measurements are 2ft by 4ft. I am told that the 3/4 top is a must. Some people go cheaper and use 1/2 but they are not as good. I am told that the reinforcement 2x4 is needed in the center of the box. Actually I have heard it both ways yes and no.

I have seen some for sell for $125 a set with no reinforcement but they look pretty nice decent paint etc. I have seen some that are $75 with bad paint jobs but have reinforcement. Both are made with 3/4 tops.

I asked the cheaper guy how much he would sell me them for unpainted and he said $50.

There is a question on the bags that come with the set. The cheap guy makes his and the $125 buys his off web (and the are better bags). Now is it important that you use Birch plywood for the top?? I was wantng to stain the set I buy and make it look like a basketball court. I have heard that many coats of poly urethane are needed is this hard to do? Are the boards better painted and how slick should they be. I know there is forums out there on this stuff but I have to ask my family.:)
.
http://home.fuse.net/mikebrungs/cornhole.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornhole_(game)




.

jimmer2880
09-28-2008, 12:43 PM
Ohh... I've seen those. Just never knew that's what they were called.

lanier92prostar
09-28-2008, 12:53 PM
Contact Rockman on the board. I think he makes them. He had some awesome cornhole boards up at Mag Mania.

jbfootin
09-29-2008, 01:04 PM
My brother has one. They are 2' x 3' with a 6" hole centered 9" down from the top. You can get 5 boards out of a 4' x 8' piece of plywood, so 2 pieces would make 5 sets. The beanbags are 5.5" square and weigh around 14 oz. filled with dry corn.

Yeah...I'm looking at making some for friends and family:)

captain planet
09-29-2008, 02:07 PM
According to American Cornhole Assoc. the boards are 2x4. The bags are 6x6-inch and weigh between 14 and 16 ounces.

You can use 1/2 inch plywood with a 2x4 frame around it. The hole is 6" round and the center of the hole is 9" from the top.

I have built and sold over 40 sets of these and 1/2" plywood is fine, as long as it has a frame around it.

ShamrockIV
09-29-2008, 03:05 PM
folks on our dock have the pimped out ones with lights inside the hole!!

jbfootin
09-29-2008, 03:11 PM
According to American Cornhole Assoc. the boards are 2x4. The bags are 6x6-inch and weigh between 14 and 16 ounces.

You can use 1/2 inch plywood with a 2x4 frame around it. The hole is 6" round and the center of the hole is 9" from the top.

I have built and sold over 40 sets of these and 1/2" plywood is fine, as long as it has a frame around it.

I'm sorry I didn't check the ACA regulations;) I must have been looking at the International rules:cool:

RexDog1
09-29-2008, 03:30 PM
We have play it for years, Yes a funny name but a fun game !!! :rolleyes: but we have started playing Ladder golf now, good game to play and drink beer!!!!:D

http://www.laddergolf.com/?gclid=CNW9ke3NgZYCFQv7agodo2qfEw (http://www.laddergolf.com/?gclid=CNW9ke3NgZYCFQv7agodo2qfEw)

djhuff
09-29-2008, 03:49 PM
1/2 in plywood is absolutely fine. 3/4 is just a little bulky and heavy for something like this. Reinforcing or not depends on how you want the boards to react. No reinforcement means the bags will "jump" a little more when they hit the board. It'll be a little harder to get them to stick. This can be good or bad, depending on how good you and your buddies are. The really hard ones make it a little easier to score points.

I've played on boards so soft that you had to put the bag straight in the hole to score any points at all.

Rockman
09-29-2008, 04:05 PM
Cornhole boxes can vary based on what "game" you are playing...there are different bag games but alot of people that "cornhole" is one game when it's not.

Same goes true for the weight of the bags and the number of bags you play with.

Depending where in the U.S. you are, the game itself, the equipment and the rules will vary.



I do make boxes...probably made over 25 sets last summer. The types varied from collapsable ones that can fit in your trunk of your car to bigger boxes with the bling bling (ones that light up, have cup holders, etc.).

I have always used 3/4 wood for all our boxes. The 3/4 inch is more durable and easy to route of things with as compared to the 1/2 wood. No inner supports are required.

If you build your own, you can do whatever you want. If you buy from someone else, you are at the mercy of their "expertise." :D


I have seen alot of crappy boxes out there and laugh that people are serious about what they are charging. You get what you pay for.:cool:

SkiDog
09-29-2008, 04:45 PM
I always heard it was like strip poker::D

It WAS at MM4!:D:D Right footrgirl?;)

OhioX14
09-29-2008, 05:38 PM
According to American Cornhole Assoc. the boards are 2x4. The bags are 6x6-inch and weigh between 14 and 16 ounces.

You can use 1/2 inch plywood with a 2x4 frame around it. The hole is 6" round and the center of the hole is 9" from the top.

I have built and sold over 40 sets of these and 1/2" plywood is fine, as long as it has a frame around it.

CP is right on with this, both with the specs and the 1/2" ply. In fact, my local Home Depot sells precut 2' x 4' sheets which is what I went with. Sure, it's a little more expensive per square foot but was still less than a whole sheet and I didn't need the excess plywood and it saved on the cutting and build time. I bought a quality set of bags and decals online (scarlet and gray bags and OSU decals of course) to finish them off and save time. It's a great set that will last for years and still cost me a lot less thay buying them prebuilt.

sortloff
09-29-2008, 06:43 PM
Be sure to build them stout because someone will always wind up standing on the board after a few drinks. These were homemade with 2x4s and 1/2 plywood. Plenty strong. One tip is not to get the finish too slick, since the corn bags need to be able to stop on the surface.
40755:)

JimN
09-29-2008, 06:45 PM
"No reinforcement means the bags will "jump" a little more when they hit the board"

Yeah, but if you're good, you'll never toss one that hits the top- they'll all go right through the hols.

mrprostar
09-29-2008, 06:58 PM
I've always called this game "put your sac through it". Not sure what the real name but my other favorite is "Wrap your balls around it". Where you throw the two golf balls strung together and try to wrap it around the PVC ladder.

Rockman
09-29-2008, 07:00 PM
I've always called this game "put your sac through it". Not sure what the real name but my other favorite is "Wrap your balls around it". Where you throw the two golf balls strung together and try to wrap it around the PVC ladder.

Sometimes called Hillbilly Golf or Hillbilly horseshoes too!

jbfootin
09-30-2008, 10:58 AM
Not sure what the real name but my other favorite is "Wrap your balls around it". Where you throw the two golf balls strung together and try to wrap it around the PVC ladder.


We call it testicle toss:rolleyes: