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Chicago190
09-12-2008, 07:17 PM
So I was thinking about how to winterize today at work and didn't know what procedure people use to drain the block and fill with antifreeze. Should I:

1. Drain block/manifolds, reinstall plugs, and then suck up 5-6 gallons of antifreeze through the raw water pickup, and leave plugs in.

2. Just suck up the antifreeze and leave as is.

3. Drain block/manifolds, reinstall plugs, suck up antifreeze, and then uninstall plugs again letting some of the antifreeze drain out.

Also, for EFI motors, is just fogging each cylinder through the spark plug hole sufficient?

TMCNo1
09-12-2008, 07:39 PM
If your gonna suck up the antifreeze thru the raw water pump, leave everything in place, but pull the impeller if you wish or just wait and change it in the spring.

TMCNo1
09-12-2008, 07:47 PM
To be honest, 2 gallons of antifreeze mixed with 2 gallons of water, 50/50 will give you -20 below zero protection IIRC and after the engine is warm to operating temp and you start pulling in the antifreeze mix, you'll probably waste 1/2 of it out the exhaust during the process till the bucket is dry with 4 gallons. At least that's the way it's been in the past when I've done it in 2 other boats.

JimN
09-12-2008, 08:39 PM
First of all, the type of anti freeze needs to be addressed. RV only, no propylene glycol. That is, if you actually use it. You can drain the motor after adding fuel stabilizer to the gas and topping the tank off, then running it for about 5-10 minutes. Change the oil and filter while it's warm, fog it (each cylinder is fine-pull the lanyard and crank it for about 10 seconds to coat), pull all of the hoses off and make sure they drain, clear out the oil cooler, remove the impeller and blow out the speedo lines.

If you know a lot of boaters, consider buying in bulk, including a big Rubbermaid plastic watering trough. Drain the motor and replace the plugs and then place the trough behind the boat so the anti-freeze can return to it, using a plastic hose to draw water from the trough to the hull side of the oil cooler. That way, the only liquid the motor will be running on is anti-freeze and there's no chance of water remaining in the motor. This works for stern drives, too, but some way to keep the liquid from spraying past the trough will be needed. For a stern drive, the water inlet will need to be submerged in the anti-freeze or you could use a bilge pump with a muff, connected to a spare battery to pump the liquid into the inlet.

Anti-freeze is too cheap to risk damage by diluting it. In theory, it works but there's no way to guarantee how much water is in the motor, in addition to what it was diluted with, IMO.

east tx skier
09-12-2008, 08:40 PM
If you use it, drain it then suck it up. Don't dilute it.

Chicago190
09-12-2008, 08:55 PM
Yeah I was just going to get the enviro safe RV stuff. So my plan is:

1. Change oil
2. Drain hoses, block, manifolds, and blow out speedo tubes.
3. Replace plugs and then suck 5 gallons of RV antifreeze into engine.
4. Fog engine

Sound right?

JimN
09-12-2008, 08:59 PM
That should work. If you still have the petcocks, I would change them to brass plugs. Petcocks don't let the water flow out as fast. Other than that, it should be good.

erkoehler
09-12-2008, 09:11 PM
Make sure you stick a small screw driver in to the plug holes so that you clear away any debris to fully drain the block.

Gonzo
09-12-2008, 10:26 PM
Ok, does everyone but me know what fogging the engine is?

east tx skier
09-12-2008, 10:42 PM
Yeah I was just going to get the enviro safe RV stuff. So my plan is:

1. Change oil
2. Drain hoses, block, manifolds, and blow out speedo tubes.
3. Replace plugs and then suck 5 gallons of RV antifreeze into engine.
4. Fog engine

Sound right?

www.easttxskier.com/articles.html

east tx skier
09-12-2008, 10:45 PM
Ok, does everyone but me know what fogging the engine is?

On carb'd and TBI engines, remove the flame arrestor and, with the engine running at high idle, spray fogging oil into the throttle body (you can also pour Marvel Mystery Oil in it). You'll see lots of white smoke in the exhaust doing this and it'll eventually kill the engine.

On a MPI with a dry intake, do not fog the intake. Rather, remove the spark plugs and fog the cylinders. Then, turn the engine over by hand. You can fog the cylinders individually on the carb or tbi motors as well.

Be very careful not to lose the little red straw when fogging.

jimmer2880
09-13-2008, 07:36 AM
Also, you need to first either a) Get your engine temp up to the point where your T-stat will be open, or b) remove your thermostat before sucking the antifreeze. Personally, I do option b) because I want to be 100% sure that I got it through my engine.

bigmac
09-13-2008, 08:28 AM
My dealer pickles all the boats they winterize - they use -100 propylene glycol. Don't use auto antifreeze (ethylene glycol) because that's toxic and not biodegradable.

JohnE
09-13-2008, 10:29 AM
Not sure why, but Joe at MC of Charlotte told me to just fill the system with anti-freeze through the J - hose. (MCX) Just pour it in until it is filled. About 2 1/2 gallons. And told me to fog it through the air intake - not each cylinder. And it barely hesitated when fogging - something aobut the computer compensating for it. I was afraid I didn't do it right and called him about it.

erkoehler
09-13-2008, 10:44 AM
Which motor do you have?

JimN
09-13-2008, 11:03 AM
The ECM will compensate for some RPM drop by opening the IAC. Some fogging oil becomes gummy after being on a surface and being heated & cooled repeatedly. The throttle body and intake don't need to have fogging oil settling on them, so maintaining a higher than idle RPM is needed when fogging through the throttle body, on MPI or TBI. As long as the oil atomizes well (hard to do in cold weather) and the air speed is high enough, it'll coat the back of the valves and the cylinders. Spraying in though the spark plug holes ensures that enough gets into the cylinders.

east tx skier
09-13-2008, 11:51 AM
Not sure why, but Joe at MC of Charlotte told me to just fill the system with anti-freeze through the J - hose. (MCX) Just pour it in until it is filled. About 2 1/2 gallons. And told me to fog it through the air intake - not each cylinder. And it barely hesitated when fogging - something aobut the computer compensating for it. I was afraid I didn't do it right and called him about it.

That will work fine with the j-tube. Just raise it as high as you can, cram a funnel in it and fill (assuming you have already drained everything. As far as fogging the intake, so long as it is a carb or tbi, that's fine. If it's MPI, depends if it is a dry intake or not.

Gonzo
09-14-2008, 06:41 PM
On carb'd and TBI engines, remove the flame arrestor and, with the engine running at high idle, spray fogging oil into the throttle body (you can also pour Marvel Mystery Oil in it). You'll see lots of white smoke in the exhaust doing this and it'll eventually kill the engine.

On a MPI with a dry intake, do not fog the intake. Rather, remove the spark plugs and fog the cylinders. Then, turn the engine over by hand. You can fog the cylinders individually on the carb or tbi motors as well.

Be very careful not to lose the little red straw when fogging.

Thanks Tex, this will be my first yr. winterizing, so it should be intresting. In the words of Hammer when we talked Sat. "Just remember where are the plugs go this year so you can run the boat before fathers day!" (did I female dog about it that much?? I dont remember?? ;):rolleyes::rolleyes:))

NeilM
09-15-2008, 10:13 AM
Winterized yesterday :(.

JIMN, I don't use any RV antifreeze in the engine - I pull the plugs and hoses as per the owner's manual - have done so for years. Am I risking anything? A cold snap up here easily is minus 40F.

I DO use RV antifreeze throughout the ballast system & shower...

JimN
09-15-2008, 10:37 AM
I don't remember seeing air crack a block.

When I was at MC training, they told us how they winterized boats when the shop was still open and it didn't involve anti-freeze. I do like the lubricating abilities IF the impeller is left in, but I don't like leaving the impeller in, so that's a moot point. As long as all hoses are pulled and emptied, the block is well drained, oil cooler is drained, it's well fogged and cranked over to remove any water that was in the circulating pump, it should be OK.

east tx skier
09-15-2008, 10:45 AM
Jim, correct me if I'm wrong, but there is some corrosion protection to be gained from using the pink stuff in the block, right?

Gonzo
09-15-2008, 11:24 AM
All this talk of winterizing, makes me miss my heat exchanger on the glass master. Pull up, turn over the engine to empty the lower unit. Pop the plug on the exchanger, DONE!

bigmac
09-15-2008, 12:39 PM
Up here in the land of ice and snow, I don't trust -50 propylene glycol...-100 (which is green) is the order of the day. For 25 years of boat ownership, I only drained the block only - antifreeze in only the last 5 years or so. I do like the antifreeze because of its corrosion inhibition and the fact that it appears to be a lot kinder to impellers. I don't routinely change my impeller every year anymore.

Antifreeze color is not officially standardized. The color of the product is a more-or-less arbitrary decision by the mfgr. Most RV antifreeze is pink. Not all of it, however. RV antifreeze is designed for potable water systems, but then there is regular propylene glycol which has other additives that, while environmentally safe, are not necessarily designed to be part of drinking water.

JimN
09-15-2008, 05:00 PM
There is some corrosion protection but since it still has water in it, it will corrode a bit, going by the rust I have seen in antifreeze that comes out. It's not mandatory, either way. Tens of thousands of boats that are still running fine have been winterized and never had antifreeze and many have cracked blocks because something didn't allow it into some part of the motor, so...

If I ever had any doubt that antifreeze replaced the water, I would always drain it and repeat the process but when I used -90 and ran the boats on the tub without any water, we also tested what came out with a refractometer.

Kevin 89MC
09-15-2008, 05:52 PM
This thread proves again there different ways to winterize. A friend of mine told me that a local ski boat dealer (not MC) does not use any antifreeze, they just make sure everything is drained.
I was taught by an old MC service manager to drain the block & manifolds, drain the intake hose, pull the impeller, fog the cylinders, and fill with antifreeze "untill it pisses green out the draincocks" (I now use RV antifreeze). It usually takes less than a gallon, and i reuse it for one or two seasons until it starts to look diluted. I've not had any problems up here in the frozen tundra where it usually will hit -20 degrees farenheit several times each winter. Gotta find some wood to knock on now! Another friend did crack his block a long time ago, when he didn't quite get it all drained out! Not sure I'd ever want to skip the antifreeze, I know I would have some sleepless nights come February! I've seen the incredible power of ice and the destruction it can cause.

Chicago190
09-15-2008, 06:16 PM
I just winterized this weekend. For me, the extra insurance is worth the 15 dollars of antifreeze it takes. I also drained the block and all the hoses, so I'm doubly safe. Is there really much danger from freezing if you don't use antifreeze? Obviously not but I guess it has some other benefits. Plus it makes it easier to dewinterize in the spring because you don't have to replace any of the plugs or the impeller.

bigmac
09-15-2008, 09:37 PM
I just winterized this weekend. For me, the extra insurance is worth the 15 dollars of antifreeze it takes. I also drained the block and all the hoses, so I'm doubly safe. Is there really much danger from freezing if you don't use antifreeze? Obviously not but I guess it has some other benefits. Plus it makes it easier to dewinterize in the spring because you don't have to replace any of the plugs or the impeller.Yep. I just drop the boat in the lake and go. I idle it on the trailer til it's up to temp...just to make sure the impeller didn't fry.

I think antifreeze has its advantages, but I don't think there's anything wrong with just draining everything and leaving it open. I did that for 20 years on previous boats without a problem here in the frozen tundra.

stan-the-man
09-15-2008, 09:41 PM
This thread proves again there different ways to winterize. A friend of mine told me that a local ski boat dealer (not MC) does not use any antifreeze, they just make sure everything is drained.
I was taught by an old MC service manager to drain the block & manifolds, drain the intake hose, pull the impeller, fog the cylinders, and fill with antifreeze "untill it pisses green out the draincocks" (I now use RV antifreeze). It usually takes less than a gallon, and i reuse it for one or two seasons until it starts to look diluted. I've not had any problems up here in the frozen tundra where it usually will hit -20 degrees farenheit several times each winter. Gotta find some wood to knock on now! Another friend did crack his block a long time ago, when he didn't quite get it all drained out! Not sure I'd ever want to skip the antifreeze, I know I would have some sleepless nights come February! I've seen the incredible power of ice and the destruction it can cause.
Kevin 89MC, I like how you describe it. How do you fill with antifreeze "untill it pisses green out the draincocks" ? Where do you pour the stuff?

Muttley
09-16-2008, 10:46 AM
>whew!< All this winterization talk makes me glad I've got a heated garage! :woohoo:

FWIW, before the garage, I never used antifreeze in the block. After fogging and all the other stuff, I just drained the block thoroughly and pulled the lower ends of all the water hoses. I hate the idea of any liquid sitting in the block for extended periods (paranoid? Maybe). Then I'd put a block to hold up the engine cover, hang a trouble light in the boat, put in a Dri-Zit dehumidifier and put the cover on it.

bigmac
09-16-2008, 10:56 AM
Wish I could find the boating article, but I read that there is more block damage from freezing in boats stored in "heated" garages, and in "warmer" areas like the mid-south than in the northern deep-freeze states.

I have a heated garage too, but I would NEVER bet my engine block on the reliability of Minnesota Power.

JimN
09-16-2008, 11:08 AM
Never be lulled into a false sense of security by thinking that a heated garage will prevent block damage in winter. 29 degrees for three days will kill it. If a boat is in 40 degree water and the air temp gets to freezing, the motor won't usually crack. The warmer water will warm the air enough that it'll stay above the freezing point. Also, remember that freezing begins at 39 degrees.

Muttley
09-16-2008, 02:16 PM
I have a heated garage too, but I would NEVER bet my engine block on the reliability of Minnesota Power.

Besides pulling the battery and having it on an automatic trickle charger, I still drain it because I don't like water sitting in it for corrosion reasons and, of course, in case the power does go out. I just don't bother fogging it. Mostly because I try and sneak out if we get a good day. If we don't get a good day, I'll spark it up twice a month and drain it again.

Of course, we don't get -40 here either. We don't get much snow, mostly just lots and lots of rain.

JimN
09-16-2008, 02:32 PM
I's still fog it. That cast iron corrodes awfully fast if it doesn't have any protection.

bigmac
09-16-2008, 05:05 PM
Oh well, that makes more sense...draining it should be fine...pull the block drains, disconnect the manifold drains, empty the hoses, clear the heater/shower.

I have never understood the rationale for disconnecting the battery if one is going to use a maintainer on it all winter (which most definitely is what one should do). I leave my battery in the boat, connected, all winter and keep it charged with a Battery Tender. I don't see the point in disconnecting it or removing it from the boat.

One also needs to distinguish between a maintainer and a trickle charger. A trickle charger WILL damage a battery by overcharging and boiling off electrolyte - it's a continuous charge. A maintainer will monitor charge state and keep the battery fully charged without the possibility of overcharging.

Kevin 89MC
09-16-2008, 05:35 PM
Kevin 89MC, I like how you describe it. How do you fill with antifreeze "untill it pisses green out the draincocks" ? Where do you pour the stuff?

I pull off the big hose up by the t-stat housing and just pour the A/F in there.

stan-the-man
09-16-2008, 11:39 PM
I will go for antifreeze but do not understand why MC manual regarding winterization says:"...use of propylene glycol is strictly prohibited. " yet the Imdemar manual indicates their fresh water engins use propylene glycol. Has anyone asked MC why they prohibited it if their engin supplier uses it in the same engin blocks?

88 PS190
09-17-2008, 12:19 AM
I stabil the fuel, drive to the boat launch and pull the boat, drain all water, get it out of the hull. Then i remove the hose to the thru hull fitting and pour antifreeze in there, then put the hose into a bucket with a few gallons of antifreeze,

I fire it up (w/ the spark arrestor off) then watching the level of the antifreeze i get ready, as it gets low i give the carb a few toots of fogging spray, which lowers the rpm, then as it gets to the point of empty i fog heavier which stalls the engine.

Key off, and then the rest of whatever you do.

IMHO this gets the majority of the water out, then puts antifreeze in, which gets the rest, and gets the trans cooler, the exhausts etc so there's not pure water hanging out anywhere.

Hollywood
09-17-2008, 10:45 AM
I will go for antifreeze but do not understand why MC manual regarding winterization says:"...use of propylene glycol is strictly prohibited. " yet the Imdemar manual indicates their fresh water engins use propylene glycol. Has anyone asked MC why they prohibited it if their engin supplier uses it in the same engin blocks?

Because with FWC cooled engines the A/F won't be flushed out all over the place every spring.

bigmac
09-17-2008, 11:02 AM
Because with FWC cooled engines the A/F won't be flushed out all over the place every spring.

Propylene glycol is non-toxic and 100% biodegradeable. What's the problem with propylene glycol in the environment?

Hollywood
09-17-2008, 02:52 PM
I read too fast, I thought he said ethylene.

I don't know why propylene glycol would be prohibited, JimN?

Interesting... looks like the PCM ZR6 engine calls for ethylene glycol (-36 F), while Indmar calls for Sierra propylene glycol (good down to -26 F) both at 50/50.

JimN
09-17-2008, 05:27 PM
Ethylene glycol is the bad stuff but propylene glycol can be bad in large doses or with high sensitivity.

This is why Eth. Glycol is bad:

http://www.righthealth.com/Health/Antifreeze%20Poisoning-s?lid=goog-ads-sb-8536643334

100% biodegradable doesn't mean that big loads should be dumped, though and when anything like that breakes down, it uses 02 from the water.

The PCM manual was also written before propylene glycol was widely available and IIRC, they recommended draining it before going into any body of water. If they didn't, it was probably due to ignorance/lack of EPA mandates and it was when people used to drain their radiators and dump it down a sewer and dump oil when they changed it, next to a telephone pole to get rid of it.

bigmac
09-17-2008, 06:05 PM
.... but propylene glycol can be bad in large doses or with high sensitivity.



Better hope it's not TOO bad...it's in a about 80% of the processed food you eat, not to mention virtually all cosmetics.

JimN
09-17-2008, 06:16 PM
"Better hope it's not TOO bad...it's in a about 80% of the processed food you eat, not to mention virtually all cosmetics."

Well, anything in a huge amount can be hazardous and there's always someone/thing that has a low tolerance but it is GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe).

You don't think we eat and drink things that aren't safe, every day?

captain planet
09-18-2008, 03:43 PM
First of all, the type of anti freeze needs to be addressed. RV only, no propylene glycol.

I'm a little late to the party, but I was told NOT to use RV antifreeze in my boat because my engine (LT-1) has aluminum heads. I have been using ethylene glycol (the old green stuff) for 10 years now. I use 3 gallons each year. When I get the boat out for the summer, I capture all I can and re-use it the following year (provided it hasn't been diluted too much).

The rest which gets diluted when I run a hose into the raw water intake and it comes out my exhause, I take and dispose of properly. Usually ends up being about 10 gallons worth.

bigmac
09-18-2008, 04:06 PM
I'm a little late to the party, but I was told NOT to use RV antifreeze in my boat because my engine (LT-1) has aluminum heads.

I hear that a lot. Nobody has ever explained to me WHAT the problem is with propylene glycol and aluminum heads. In fact, I've never seen this written, only relayed by anecdote.

If you, or anyone else, has any documentation as to deleterious effects of RV antifreeze on aluminum heads, I'd really appreciate hearing it. Meantime, in the absence of direct information and explanation of mechanism, I'm inclined to chalk this antifreeze/aluminum myth up to urban legend.

captain planet
09-18-2008, 05:06 PM
If you, or anyone else, has any documentation as to deleterious effects of RV antifreeze on aluminum heads, I'd really appreciate hearing it.

I don't have any, I am just playing it safe. :confused:

I just contacted my dealer about this. I will let you know what they say.

TheOneandOnly
09-18-2008, 06:10 PM
whats the best way to winterize the heater section in an 08x2

bigmac
09-18-2008, 06:25 PM
whats the best way to winterize the heater section in an 08x2
At the minimum, blow air through it. Preferably, pump it full of -100 RV antifreeze after you blow air through it. I use an RV antifreeze pump, disconnect the heater hose at the barbed fitting in the bilge and drain the water, then hook up the pump and keep pumping until I hear it returning to the block.

http://www.idealtruevalue.com/catalog/getimage_new_50551_1.asp

JimN
09-18-2008, 08:36 PM
We were told at MC training that the LT-1 shouldn't be winterized with RV anti-freeze. The source is good enough for me to do what I was told.

bigmac
09-18-2008, 10:59 PM
We were told at MC training that the LT-1 shouldn't be winterized with RV anti-freeze. The source is good enough for me to do what I was told.Not good enough for me. Until I see it written, not anecdotal, and understand the mechanism...urban legend. I want to know why.

east tx skier
09-18-2008, 11:22 PM
Because Jim said so. Everything on here is technically internet lore.

Cast Iron and loving it.

:)

bigmac
09-19-2008, 12:23 AM
Sierra-brand coolant is commonly used in cars these days, and is also the antifreeze recommended by Indmar for their fresh water cooling systems. Sierra is propylene glycol, and the difference between it and RV antifreeze is the phosphate corrosion inhibitors in the RV stuff. I agree that one should NOT use RV antifreeze for coolant in any fresh water cooled marine engine with aluminum heads because of hot spot corrosion. The heat at the point of exhaust manifold will cause the phosphate to react with the aluminum and form aluminum phosphate, a gel which will plug up radiator coolant passages. It takes heat from a running engine for this to occur. It doesn't occur in the cooler aluminum radiators of those engines - we've all used tons of phosphate-containing ethylene glycol in our aluminum radiators for decades. Hot spot corrosion won't occur with the engine cold and not running.

So, I contend that RV antifreeze, phosphates and all, is fine for pickling a raw-water cooled engine for storage (as in winterization) aluminum heads and all. But any LT-1 owner that's worried about it can always use Sierra-brand propylene glycol coolant to store the boat instead of RV antifreeze. IMHO, incurring the increased expense of Sierra coolant for winter storage is certainly no dumber than using synthetic oil in the engine.

1boarder
10-19-2008, 10:06 AM
This is the first winter where I get to enjoy closed cooling. It is nice to already have anifreeze in the block and the heater. With that being said, is there anything I am missing besides draining the heat exchanger, running stabil and filling up the tank, and fogging the cylinders? Thanks

bigmac
10-19-2008, 10:15 AM
Check the actual performance of your coolant. Don't forget to use a testing tool that is specific to propylene glycol. A standard auto antifreeze hydrometer won't work. Also, bear in mind that those things are only accurate to about +/- 8 degrees.

JohnnyB
10-19-2008, 10:40 AM
At the minimum, blow air through it. Preferably, pump it full of -100 RV antifreeze after you blow air through it. I use an RV antifreeze pump, disconnect the heater hose at the barbed fitting in the bilge and drain the water, then hook up the pump and keep pumping until I hear it returning to the block.

http://www.idealtruevalue.com/catalog/getimage_new_50551_1.asp

I blew my heater out with my air compressor.....disconnected the hot line at the engine and blew air through it, watching the water blow back through at the Y-pipe.....put air to it until the air coming back through the system was dry.....

Do I really need to send antifreeze through it at this point?

JohnnyB
10-19-2008, 10:43 AM
My normal winterizing is:

Get engine to temp
Shut down
change oil and tranny fluid
Restart and get to temp
Shut down
Drain
Hook up 5 gal bulk tank with antifreeze
Run engine and transom shower to suck up 5 gal
drain again (make sure I see pink everywhere)

No good way to drain the shower that I know of....it is the only thing that stays pickled.

I use normal -50deg rating RV antifreeze

bigmac
10-19-2008, 10:54 AM
I blew my heater out with my air compressor.....disconnected the hot line at the engine and blew air through it, watching the water blow back through at the Y-pipe.....put air to it until the air coming back through the system was dry.....

Do I really need to send antifreeze through it at this point?

I don't know. Replacing a fractured heater core (I've done that) is enough of a PITA that I minimize the risk.

A lot depends on where in "God's Country" you are, and how cold it gets there. If it's God's Country in Phoenix, then I wouldn't bother. If it's God's Country in Minnesota, then I would (do) use -100 propylene glycol.

As an experiment, take about a cup of your -50 RV antifreeze and put it in your freezer overnight....

east tx skier
10-19-2008, 10:56 AM
Sierra-brand coolant is commonly used in cars these days, and is also the antifreeze recommended by Indmar for their fresh water cooling systems. Sierra is propylene glycol, and the difference between it and RV antifreeze is the phosphate corrosion inhibitors in the RV stuff. I agree that one should NOT use RV antifreeze for coolant in any fresh water cooled marine engine with aluminum heads because of hot spot corrosion. The heat at the point of exhaust manifold will cause the phosphate to react with the aluminum and form aluminum phosphate, a gel which will plug up radiator coolant passages. It takes heat from a running engine for this to occur. It doesn't occur in the cooler aluminum radiators of those engines - we've all used tons of phosphate-containing ethylene glycol in our aluminum radiators for decades. Hot spot corrosion won't occur with the engine cold and not running.

So, I contend that RV antifreeze, phosphates and all, is fine for pickling a raw-water cooled engine for storage (as in winterization) aluminum heads and all. But any LT-1 owner that's worried about it can always use Sierra-brand propylene glycol coolant to store the boat instead of RV antifreeze. IMHO, incurring the increased expense of Sierra coolant for winter storage is certainly no dumber than using synthetic oil in the engine.

My local dealer used to buy sierra af by the pallet for winterization.

JohnnyB
10-19-2008, 11:04 AM
I've gotta change my location back from God's Country to Green Bay, WI. I actually now live in a small town just south of GB along the Fox River and my buddies have been telling me its about time I moved to God's Country....used to live about 40min north on the Door Peninsula....anyway, get what you mean about not risking the cracked core...I just installed my heater last spring and I would've taken pictures but it would be impossible...I had to almost literally stand on my head to get the heater screwed to the floow behind the drivers kick panel and it was even more of a trick to get all the hoses and ducting connected....don't want to do that again :D

JimN
10-19-2008, 11:20 AM
"I had to almost literally stand on my head to get the heater screwed to the floow behind the drivers kick panel and it was even more of a trick to get all the hoses and ducting connected.."

This just means you need more tools.

TMCNo1
10-19-2008, 11:51 AM
41423

Will it increase the size of your impeller??http://smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/36/36_1_1.gif

bigmac
10-19-2008, 12:03 PM
41423

Will it increase the size of your impeller??http://smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/36/36_1_1.gif

Seems to me I read a post here on Team Talk recently from LOXCATLEDB in Indonesia that had some information on that....the actual pump looked a little different, though.