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View Full Version : New Guy: Just had prop repaired, what should I expect?


bwilson
09-04-2008, 11:28 PM
First time boat owner. Just bought my 03' ProStar 209 8 weeks ago. I am a technically savy guy and prefer to do things myself which is already proving to come in handy since I am finding plenty of things to do to keep me busy with this boat. I have already had a handful of bad experiences with the boat, kinda hard lessons learned sorts of things.

First outing I discovered the hard way where the drain plug is and how important it is that it be where it belongs before you launch. I felt sick, and wanted to be mad at the guy who sold it to me for not walking me through these details (bought it through a Nautique Dealer). The plug was lose in the bilge (didn't know that at the time), full of merky water and the boat was so full it would even plane and started to bog down. I could feel where the water was coming in but couldn't find the plug so my buddy jammed his thumb in the hole under the running motor while I headed for shore to "softly" beach it. Barley made it.

Second, when the gas gauge starts to budge off pegged full, you better get your *** to the ramp or be near a marina cause anything less than full means you got about 10-15 minutes of fuel left.

On to the point, last weekend I took us through a sandbar and hit the prop. On a scale from 1-10 it felt like maybe a 4 but sure enough when we got the boat pushed into the clear I felt a vibration and idled us back to the ramp. The damage really didn't look that bad.

http://www.dsmtimes.org/tech/myboat/prop2.jpg
http://www.dsmtimes.org/tech/myboat/prop1.jpg
http://www.dsmtimes.org/tech/myboat/stern.jpg

I took it off and sent to a local shop here. When I got it back it looked as good as new. Well we put it in the water tonight and took it for a spin. I am thinking that I am still feeling a vibration. The longer we stayed out the more I started to obsess about it till I was sure that either I bent it again, it wasn't fixed right somehow despite looking perfect or the nut backed off and it maybe it is dangling by the cotter pin. Got it back on the trailer and everything still looks fine. The shaft doesn't appear damaged or visually bent and spins freely in the strut bearing. It was very choppy out though. When I asked everyone else in the boat they're opinions I got varying answers from confirming my vibration feeling to "the motor sounds different". So what should I expect from a repaired prop? Am I just being neurotic I wonder?

I tell ya, after being stranded out in the middle of the lake a couple times (once almost sinking) I really am starting to feel uneasy and on edge every time I take the boat out. Strange noises and vibrations really get my attention. I bought this boat for a little relaxation and I am starting to feel a little overwhelmed. :confused:

east tx skier
09-04-2008, 11:32 PM
Welcome. That shaft looks bent. The gas gauge issue is probably the float in the tank. Tie the drain plug to the steering wheel when you put up. Everybody does it at some point. Makes it harder to forget that way.

lawrence1hall
09-04-2008, 11:45 PM
I also have a 2003 209 and I think it is a great boat. I bought it new. On the plug, your experience should make sure that never happens again, I double and triple check that the plug in each time we launch. As for the fuel gauge, if you lift out the bottom of the storage behind the back seat you can see the fuel tank to do a visual on the fuel level. After about a two years of ownership I had to change the fuel filter. It is located in the fuel tank, you will be able to see the pump when you lift up the floor of the storage area. The fuel filter is at the bottom of the pump so when it gets clogged, fuel stabilizer and debris are the main culprits, the boat will starve for fuel when the tank gets low. Once I changed the filter provided from the factory I can run the boat all the way to empty. By the way, another learning experience, dont let the gas nozzle run until it kicks out when filling the boat, gas will get all over the interior. Finally, the hit to the prop could have caused an alignment issue with the propeller shaft, you would not be able to tell visually, you would have to use feeler guages between the faces of the coupling between the shaft and the transmission. Good luck!

JimN
09-05-2008, 12:00 AM
After '98, the fuel sender changed to the aluminum tube with an aluminum rod in teh middle, so there's no float on that one. There are several threads dealing with adjusting the sender so it's accurate. The first thing I would recommend is to remove the sender and, after filling a 20 oz bottle with fresh gas to about 1-1/2" from the top, turn the key ON and dip the sender in, slowly. Measure the depth of the tank where the sender goes in and mark the tube at the point that would be about 3" from the bottom of the tank. 4" would be better from the standpoint of never running out completely (the pump doesn't survive this). Set the E adjuster at this point and then gradually dip the tube farther into the bottle to see if the F setting is close or correct.

NOTE- If the sender reads correct in the bottle of fresh gas, you have water and/or some other contaminant in the tank. These senders are very accurate as long as they are used in the fluid they were adjusted in. Once a foreign substance becomes involved, the sensitivity and accuracy is affected.

If it actually has a float, it's not the original sender, but I doubt this is the case.

As far as what needs to be checked and when, do a search here for that kind of thing.

Some of the most important ones- make sure the oil cooler is clear of any weeds, twigs or anything that could keep water from flowing freely through it. If this becomes blocked, you will overheat and you can easily damage the motor. At the very lweast, you'll kill the raw water impeller.

Speaking of the raw water impeller, don't assume it's good just because all of the vanes are intact. They need to be firm and resist bending, in order to provide the proper pressure and volume needed to supply fresh water. Buy a spare impeller and gasket- these can be bought as a set and never replace only the impeller without a new gasket.

Buy a small plastic tool box and keep a basic tool kit onboard. Rather than mess around with a flat screwdriver for hose clamps, get nut drivers that fit all of the different sizes. 5/16" is what most of the hose clamps need. Keep your spare impeller in the box, along with a few hose clamps, wire ties, a multi screwdriver (I have one from Home Depot- they sell it in the electrical department), a few sockets with ratchet (if you want) or combination wrenches. A cheap multi-meter comes in handy, as well as an assortment of butt connectors, some 12 ga wire, spare hull plug and whatever else you decide you want to keep in it.

Above all, enjoy the boat.

Skipper
09-05-2008, 12:39 PM
... The shaft doesn't appear damaged or visually bent and spins freely in the strut bearing.

Follow these instructions to determine whether or not the driveshaft is bent:

1: Disconnect the driveshaft from the transmission at the coupler.
2: Separate the coupling from the driveshaft and the coupler by about 1/8".
3: Observe the gap between the couplers as you slowly rotate the driveshaft by hand.
4: If there is a noticeable change in the distance between couplers as the shaft rotates, then it is bent.
5: If you cannot observe a difference, then properly align the driveshaft and transmission.
6: If you can align properly, the shaft is not bent.

TMCNo1
09-05-2008, 02:42 PM
There is and can be a difference between having a prop repaired locally and it "Looks good as new" and properly rebuilt/repaired by a prop manufacturer. Contact Eric here, http://www.ojprops.com/contact_us , if you have your doubts about the prop after you have checked the shaft, strut and alignment and I would also check to see if the rudder is bent (picture is questionable).

JimN
09-05-2008, 04:36 PM
A really quick way to find out if the shaft is bent is to have one person turn the shaft from above while another person watches the end from the outside. If you have a dial indicator, that will tell how much it's bent but if it's visible, it needs to be straightened. I couldn't find a link but someone sells a dial indicator holder that's made from a vice grip pliers and a metal block that accepts the adjustable rods (or flexible ). The vice grip clamps onto the rudder or strut and the indicator is zeroed out. When you turn the shaft, it shows the +/- and .005" is the tolerance.

bwilson
09-05-2008, 06:43 PM
So far today I measured the shaft before and after the strut and only measured .0015" runout. I also sent the prop back to the local shop because if you look closely I can still see a difference in the leading edge of one of the blades.
I also bought a new CNC prop and will try that to confirm. I need a spare anyway.

dsoby
09-05-2008, 07:12 PM
You'll love your new prop. They are much smoother than the non-CNC props.

bwilson
09-05-2008, 07:39 PM
http://www.dsmtimes.org/tech/myboat/prop3.jpg

This 2d image may be hard to tell but I don't think the leading edge or 1 or 2 of those blades is right.

coz
09-05-2008, 07:53 PM
First outing I discovered the hard way where the drain plug is and how important it is that it be where it belongs before you launch.

With a sence of humor that overwhelmed feeling will turn to smoking & joking here, It's a tough world (boating) hang in there and take in all the advice given here.....well?....double check on any advice I give :rolleyes: all the rest should be sound :banana:

Good luck and welcome aboard :toast:

TMCNo1
09-05-2008, 09:17 PM
I tell ya, after being stranded out in the middle of the lake a couple times (once almost sinking) I really am starting to feel uneasy and on edge every time I take the boat out. Strange noises and vibrations really get my attention. I bought this boat for a little relaxation and I am starting to feel a little overwhelmed. :confused:

Hang in there and with a little patience and common sense, we'll all help get you over the hump and you can enjoy this aspect of your leisure time.

I have to consider myself lucky, in the fact that at age 12 my family got our first boat in 1956, yes, a wooden inboard and helping work on it and one other inboard till age 18, I got a great boating education from my dad and uncle and have tried to always adhere to their advise and guidence.

bwilson
09-07-2008, 08:23 PM
I threw the new CNC prop on the boat and low and behold the vibration is gone. Meanwhile, I got a voice mail Friday afternoon from the local propshop stating that they can't find anything wrong with the prop and to come and get it. I wonder if I should just ask for my money back and expect to get it.

TMCNo1
09-07-2008, 08:37 PM
I threw the new CNC prop on the boat and low and behold the vibration is gone. Meanwhile, I got a voice mail Friday afternoon from the local propshop stating that they can't find anything wrong with the prop and to come and get it. I wonder if I should just ask for my money back and expect to get it.


Maybe you need to take the local propshop guy for a boat ride and a prop swap, to show him the difference, then send the prop to OJ have it fixed right and present the propshop the bill for fixing it right.