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fletch_n_me
04-30-2005, 01:13 PM
Hey All, long time no talk. I have made quite a career move and moved from the midwest to 9,500 feet above sea level in Winter Park, CO. Even though we have had 36 inches of snow in the last 48 hours, I am going next week to drag the PS 205 out from the midwest. I have a 2003 Jeep Grand with the 4.7 V8 and it pulls like a mule. I just wanted to see if anyone had tips on trailer and/or boat prep for such a distance? Also, the southwest tends to have very sandy roads and I am wondering is anyone has any gel-coat saving tips. Any help would be appreciated.

erkoehler
04-30-2005, 01:16 PM
Don't they make a bra for the front of the boat?

MarkP
04-30-2005, 01:20 PM
Welcome back

I would just say make sure the breaks, bearings and tires are ready for the trip. If your worried about the gel, maybe think about a shrink wrap job on it..

Hey, we talked about your old jump boat a while back. What’s up with it??

BrianM
04-30-2005, 01:21 PM
Hey, nice to see you hear again. Whatever happened to the jump boat? We were all following the saga and never got any pictures then you disappeared.

fletch_n_me
04-30-2005, 01:22 PM
Still in the barn with broken transom. I love it but threw too many horses on it; I think the outboard shaft was too long and I should have had it reinforced from the get-go. How's everything been with you fellas? Let me know if you want to go skiing (snow), I can get you guys tix to any of our 16 resorts in N. America.

BrianM
04-30-2005, 01:25 PM
Welcome back

I would just say make sure the breaks, bearings and tires are ready for the trip. If your worried about the gel, maybe think about a shrink wrap job on it..




I second this for the trailering. You probably would be fine with out the shrink wrap. If it were me I would just check out the trailer and then tow it uncovered. When you get it to its new home just give it a good detail. You should be fine.

JDK
04-30-2005, 08:53 PM
I am wondering is anyone has any gel-coat saving tips. Any help would be appreciated.

Whatever you do...don't tarp it when towing!!!

Mag_Red
04-30-2005, 09:00 PM
I would say make sure you have a good spare tire and some way to change it if you have a problem. :wavey:

Ric
04-30-2005, 09:04 PM
Still in the barn with broken transom. I love it but threw too many horses on it; I think the outboard shaft was too long and I should have had it reinforced from the get-go. How's everything been with you fellas? Let me know if you want to go skiing (snow), I can get you guys tix to any of our 16 resorts in N. America.
good to see your face/avatar again mr fletcher!
see if there is a dealer near you who could shrink wrap it with that wrap that comes on it from the factory.
service the bearings before the trip &
mag said it, have a rollaround floor jack handy and a lug wrench for far less asspain in the event of an unscheduled stop

Mag_Red
04-30-2005, 09:35 PM
good to see your face/avatar again mr fletcher!
see if there is a dealer near you who could shrink wrap it with that wrap that comes on it from the factory.
service the bearings before the trip &
mag said it, have a rollaround floor jack handy and a lug wrench for far less asspain in the event of an unscheduled stop
Nothing like a nice floor jack :wavey:

G-man
04-30-2005, 09:54 PM
Add grease to the buddy bearings about every four hours. Seems like overkill but it works. Check your lugnuts along the way. I towed from Vonore to Dallas in one day doing this and no problems 918 miles. It was a single axle trailer 10 years old.

Leroy
04-30-2005, 10:40 PM
I would get one of the RV type mud flaps, not sure what they are called, but they go across the entire back of you vehicle and hang near the ground. Good for stopping stones. I have a couple of small chips from annual 700 mile round trip to Dale Hollow each year. Some in the boat, many to my trailer.

Feel the rims when you stop. You'll be amazed after doing this a few times you'll know which wheel has the least friction.

Great offer! What are the 16 locations????

rodltg2
05-01-2005, 12:41 AM
spare tire great advice! i towed to and from lake havasu ( spring break ) from chico , cal. blew out tire in the middle of mohave desert. sucked bad. no money at the time since i was in college and 20/yo. lug nuts striped out too so had to remove the hub. thought i was going to have to get a job in mohave to pay for the new tire and have the wheel and brake assembly removed . luckliy we were able to pawn a guitar we had.

Tom023
05-01-2005, 10:44 AM
If you haven't taken the lug nuts off in a while, break them lose and retorque before you start out. I do mine every spring. It's a lot easier to deal with a frozen nut at home then on the road. If you have a tandem trailer, you could use a Jiffy Jack instead of a floor jack. I used to lug around a floor jack until I got this, and it is faster and easier and works in fairly soft soil. You'll need a board or something with a floor jack if you happen to be on a soft shoulder. I now also carry a tire plug kit, couple of bucks at WalMart. If you pick up a nail, you can just plug it and pump it up without changing the tire.

http://www.hitchesonline.com/jiffyjack/jiffy.htm

COSkier
05-01-2005, 12:18 PM
To make a long story short, I purchased a PS197 on Ebay in January then drove from Colorado to North Carolina and back in three days. I don't think my truck was shut off for more than 20 minutes for the entire 3100 mile trip. I purchased removable mud flaps from Enkay and went to office max or office depot and purchased a roll of stretch wrap to wrap the tower, trailer and bow of the boat as needed. You might also want some low adhesion masking tape for the gelcoat. I put it under the cover when towing. I had to pull with the cover through a blizzard. Good luck!

Ric
05-01-2005, 01:14 PM
Nothing like a nice floor jack :wavey:
True, so true


If you haven't taken the lug nuts off in a while, break them lose and retorque before you start out. I do mine every spring. It's a lot easier to deal with a frozen nut at home then on the road. If you have a tandem trailer, you could use a Jiffy Jack instead of a floor jack. I used to lug around a floor jack until I got this, and it is faster and easier and works in fairly soft soil. You'll need a board or something with a floor jack if you happen to be on a soft shoulder. I now also carry a tire plug kit, couple of bucks at WalMart. If you pick up a nail, you can just plug it and pump it up without changing the tire.

http://www.hitchesonline.com/jiffyjack/jiffy.htm

what if it's a single axle? I'd love to get this heavy floor jack out of my truckbox if I had an option

Tom023
05-01-2005, 01:20 PM
Ric, if it's a single axle, it acts as an expensive wheel block for the other side!

east tx skier
05-01-2005, 01:48 PM
Seems obvious, but make sure the spare is properly inflated before you leave.

lakes Rick
05-01-2005, 06:31 PM
One last thought is if you are going through some freezing weather make sure the block is drained.. Be a real bummer to freeze and break during your trip...

What about your tow vehicle?? I would make sure you have a fresh oil change service, have the transmission serviced, have your axle third member/s checked for fluid level, and if need be, change oil in them also, the oil in your rear end can get very hot, especially when towing.... Check condition and air pressure in the Tow vehicle spare.. besides all 4 tires on vehicle...

Storm861triple
05-01-2005, 07:04 PM
Let me know if you want to go skiing (snow), I can get you guys tix to any of our 16 resorts in N. America.

You work at Winter Park? If so, what do you do? What is that, Intra-West now?

Just curious. I work for ASC at The Canyons.

-Tom

sfitzgerald351
05-01-2005, 07:49 PM
what if it's a single axle? I'd love to get this heavy floor jack out of my truckbox if I had an option

My bronco has a nice hi-lift bottle jack under the hood for changing out the tires on the truck. Pretty compact, nice and light, and will lift a few tons of weight no problem. I've had to use this jack a few times on the truck in Alaska and a few times on the boat trailer until I got a new (and non-bent!) axle and stopped blowing tires. The only 'problem' with the jack is that it's about 7" tall when lowered and when you have a flat tire it won't fit under the axle. But it will fit under the leaf spring just behind the axle so that's where I've jacked it up from. Works great. Just make sure you have a piece of 2'x2' x 1/2" ply to put under the jack in case you have to pull over on soft ground.

jimmer2880
05-02-2005, 07:06 AM
Good to hear you again fletch. You'll need to upload some recent pic's of that barn boat.

My 1 piece of advice that I don't believe any of the others have said is towing vehicle brakes. I'd check them & if they're close, go ahead & replace.

captkidd
05-02-2005, 11:34 AM
A fellow MC'er who regularly tows long distances recommends buying a new hub assembly and carrying it along with you, especially on long trips. You're eventually going to have to replace the bearings anyway, and a hub assembly typically isn't a lot more expensive than a set of bearings, especially if you have to try to find them in the middle of nowhere, at night, in bad weather, where it's uphill both ways...(oops, wrong story).

I think the idea of using some type of wrap for the front of the boat and trailer is a very good idea, whether you DIY or get a dealer to do it. Good luck on your trip.

VTJC
05-03-2005, 04:45 PM
I have heard from several sources that a full width rear mud flap on the tow vehicle limits the airflow under the chassis and can cause the automatic trans and other components to over heat. So they only recommend flaps behind each rear wheel. Synthetic fluid for the rear axle is also recommended. Jamie

east tx skier
05-03-2005, 04:48 PM
You work at Winter Park? If so, what do you do? What is that, Intra-West now?

Just curious. I work for ASC at The Canyons.

-Tom

We got over to the Canyons in 1999 I believe. Deer Valley is my father-in-law's favorite place these days.

6ballsisall
05-03-2005, 05:07 PM
I have heard from several sources that a full width rear mud flap on the tow vehicle limits the airflow under the chassis and can cause the automatic trans and other components to over heat. So they only recommend flaps behind each rear wheel. Synthetic fluid for the rear axle is also recommended. Jamie

I can tell you from experience this is true! Friend had a Cummins with a stock Auto, he pulled alot and had the one piece mudflap. Went thru 2 transmissions under warranty. Finally talked him into regular mudflaps cuz' they look better. 200k+ miles later, still on the same transmission and his aftermarket transmission temp gauge reads about 45 degrees cooler!