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View Full Version : Fuel Pump Change on 2005 X-2 with Pictures


boofer
07-26-2008, 01:10 AM
Well, first off, let me provide a little background information. Our motor started dying at idle a few months back. After reading up on the problem I decided to change out the fuel filter. The new fuel filter did not fix the problem. So, after more (many many hours) of reading I decided to change out the fuel pump or the "fuel module" by MC nomenclature. As many of us know, you cannot change out just the fuel pump. You have to buy this entire module at $417.93 (includes $20 shipping). The actual swap is easy and required only one specialized tool; a fuel line removal tool. It only cost around $10 for a set of them. So, let's get on with it.

Needless to say, the first thing you want to do is disconnect your negative battery terminal (all of the connections). Pull out the rear seat and the small storage container. Here you will see the "beast."

http://carpron.com/multisite/d/241769-2/Picture+171.jpg

Next, disconnect the wiring harness to the pump (mine is already disconnected in the picture). Now, loosen the clamp to the vent hose and remove the hose. Now, the next part involves removing the high pressure fuel line and it has a couple of steps.

You will need to bled off any residual pressure through the Shrader Valve. It looks exactly like a bicycle tire valve and has a plastic screw-on cap. Here is a pic with the cap removed.

http://carpron.com/multisite/d/241773-2/Picture+172a.JPG

Place a rag on the top of the valve and depress the pin in the middle (through the towel). You will get a small stream of fuel. Go ahead and replace the cap.

Back at the tank, remove the hose guide. Now, peel back the covering on the high pressure line at the regulator (metallic donut-shaped thing on the module). Guess what? Another pic. You will notice a small clip-like thing attached to the hose.

http://carpron.com/multisite/d/241807-2/Picture+201.jpg

Pop off the clip with your hands. The hose will move a little back and forth if you need a little room to remove the clip. And, another pic with the clip removed.

http://carpron.com/multisite/d/241810-2/Picture+202.jpg

boofer
07-26-2008, 01:35 AM
Now, the special tool. You simply place it on the fuel line coming out of the regulator and push it towards the hose. At the same time, pull on the hose slightly and it should just pop right off. Have a towel under the hose to catch the small amount of fuel that comes out.

http://carpron.com/multisite/d/241813-2/Picture+203.jpg

Next, remove all 12 of the bolts. The bolts have rubber seals. I would recommend buying new bolts from MC and a new main seal (seen later).

Gently pull out the module and have a rag ready to catch any dripping fuel. I put the module in a bucket for transport. Here is what the module looks like. Notice the large main seal. Buy a new one with your module (yes, it does NOT come with one). Note: This is a pic I took when I replaced just the filter. The fuel line is still attached to the regulator.

http://carpron.com/multisite/d/241776-2/Picture+173.jpg

The installation is a reverse of the removal. The part number for the bolts is 155-127 (bolt module). The part number for the main seal is 155-102 (gasket-fuel). Use this link to determine the correct fuel module for your boat. http://207.170.215.108/awweblive/AwwebStore/OnlineDoc/Part%20numbers/FUEL%20MODULE%20MATRIX%2099-07.pdf I borrowed this link from Mastercraft of Charlotte (NC).

Just to be sure that I did not have any water/debris in my gas, I siphoned out all of the fuel (12 gallons). As it turned out, there was not a drop of water and the tank was very clean (no debris). I used a simple pump suitable for gas I bought from Autozone for cheap. I elevated the front of the trailer as high as I could get it and I was able to remove all of the fuel. The nice caveat to doing this was it made the installation easier without having to worry about fuel in the tank.

Now, two notes. 1) The bolts are kind of a pain to get back in. Be patient! The last thing you want to do is strip one of these holes which equals "new fuel tank." Also, the correct socket size is 3/16". It is an Allen type socket. 2) Torque the bolts in a sort of alternating pattern to 45 in-lbs. Understand....INCH POUNDS!!! Do not torque them all the way on the first pass. And, no, I did not strip a thread or go for ft-lbs. :cool:

Also, when you reattach the fuel line, all you do is place it on the part coming out of the regulator and push it on. It should snap into place and then reinstall the clip. You do not need the special tool for this step.

boofer
07-26-2008, 01:40 AM
Just to close, here is a pic of what you get in the mail.

http://carpron.com/multisite/d/241822-2/Picture+206.jpg

The odd thing is that the small black tube does not line up with the guide on the side of the module. When I replaced just the filter, the new filter did the same thing. You can even see a mark on the filter where the nipple SHOULD be. Who makes these things? I call this shotty QA myself.

By the way, remove the cap on the black tube.

boofer
07-26-2008, 01:46 AM
Well, that's it.

I will create a new thread on the dissection of this "fuel module" in a few days. I hope that we can collaborate to solve the reason why MC fuel systems are burning up pumps. Or, at least come up with an alternative/modified system.

wiltok
07-26-2008, 06:34 AM
Excellent write up - thanks!!!

bigmac
07-26-2008, 07:11 AM
Very nice, Boofer. Thanks for doing this.

rhsprostar
07-26-2008, 08:18 AM
Nice work. Can't wait to seethe rest.
;)

coz
07-26-2008, 08:24 AM
With all the "my boat won't start" threads lately this thread will come in handy, nice job Boof :headbang:

vision
07-26-2008, 04:52 PM
Thank you Boofer for the images. I am sure I will need to replace the one in my 08 MCX some day. Had to in my 2005 MCX.

I can not agree with you more on the MC fuel pump problem you have posted about. I realize that this is not an easy task (injecting high pressure gas in a marine environment), but the design is to say the least disappointing.

My fuel alarm, set to 1/4 tank, went off yesterday after boating for 5 hours. Started with a full 53 gallons. Gauge indeed said slightly below 1/4 tank. We cut our outing short to head back to the dock and refuel. Took a whopping 23 gallons. So the tank was really about 56% full. To prevent MC from having to replace a fuel pump under warranty they simply set the gas gauge to be off by 15 gallons and no one runs the tank too low. I guess that is one way around a poor design.

SteveO
07-27-2008, 09:22 AM
after boating for 5 hours. .... Took a whopping 23 gallons.

Vision, you running stock ballast or just cruising? 4.6 GPH is really good IMO. If I a cruising and don't have the fly high filled I can get that, but if we are boarding full sacs and tanks, and are boarding rider after rider, I get about 6.5 GPH.

vision
07-27-2008, 10:53 AM
Vision, you running stock ballast or just cruising? 4.6 GPH is really good IMO. If I a cruising and don't have the fly high filled I can get that, but if we are boarding full sacs and tanks, and are boarding rider after rider, I get about 6.5 GPH.

Sorry for the thread jack Boofer.

The 4.6 GPH from the other day was with minimal ballast as we were pulling novice riders.

Normally we get 5.2 to 5.5 GPH running about 1300 lbs of Ballast plus 3 people. I do not use the built in ballast as I get a much better wake shape with about 500 lbs in a Fly High sac in each rear locker, and about 150 lbs under each front seat. So we are likely running less ballast than you are.

I was getting between 6 - 6.5 GPH originally with this set up. Then I swamped out the stock 14.25 x 14 prop for a 14.75 x 13 prop with extra cupping at the suggestion of Eric at OJ Props. Better hole shot, and better fuel efficiency for what we do. The prop will save us about $600.00 in gas this year and essentially pay for itself.

In theory, the more ballast and the more frequently you fall, the more you would benefit from the 14.75 x 13 prop in terms of fuel efficiency by making the boat more efficiency on the initial pull. If you do long sets (do not fall often) or cruise far to ride, or regularly cruise at speeds above 35 mph, then this prop may not help your GPH.

boofer
07-27-2008, 12:30 PM
vision, boat fuel gauges/senders are notorious for reading "incorrectly." Unlike your car, your boat's CG constantly changes (amount of fuel, # of people, where they sit, choppy or smooth water, ballast, gear, speed, etc). Go to any boating message board and you will find that there is not a perfect fuel gauge out there. I think that the manufacturers have done the best that they can with the gauges; minus a really good calibration. When they calibrated your sender at the factory there is no telling how the boat was situated. Which, by the way, you can calibrate your gauge. I need to do this myself. Mine reads a full tank with only 20 gallons (33 gallon tank). Your problem is a sender calibration problem.

boofer
07-27-2008, 11:22 PM
Just a note. Took the boat out and it ran perfectly.

I calibrated the fuel gauge today. I adjusted the FULL. The empty was good. It was showing way too high. When I got it to read just a smidgen below FULL, any subtle turn on the screw would cause it to instantly peg (past the FULL mark). It was like there was a threshold of 0.000000000000000001 degree of turn between just under FULL and pegged. I settled for just under FULL (needle touches the FULL mark on the left side).

rhsprostar
07-28-2008, 12:15 PM
Boofer
How do you recalibrate the fuel gauge?

jwroblew
07-28-2008, 12:48 PM
You can change the fuel pump with out changing the whole sender. There is a big thread on here about it, it takes about 1.5 hours to change out, here is the info.
fuel pump for a 1992 Ford Tempo with any engine
I believe the part numbers are,
AC Delco part number EP3156
Master part number E2065 (AutoZone)
should cost around $69

A lot better than the 400 plus from MC. I did mine last year, thing has over 200 hours on the AutoZone pump, runs like a champ...

boofer
07-28-2008, 01:57 PM
rhs, there are two small phillips screws on the top of the sender. One is marked FULL and the other is marked EMPTY. I used the procedure listed here for my particular version (3 wire).

http://www.centroidproducts.com/3wire.htm

Setting the EMPTY is a little more tricky and since mine looked okay I did not mess with it. I just adjusted the FULL. There was a little bit of some sort of "stuff" on the two screws that I had to pick off. I assume it is there once they calibrate the gauge to keep it from changing. It looked blue. So, I put a drop of blue Locktite on it when I was done.

jwroblew, I am more than familiar with the replacement pump option. I have read all of the posts regarding pump failures and the options. I just have a hard time using a pump that someone on an internet message board says will work on a $45k boat. But, if you take a look at some of the more recent posts regarding this issue you will see my name on several. I am going to essentially dissect this module and hopefully come up with a verified (without a doubt) replacement. I have spoke with Carter/Federal Mogul and they will not release any information about this MC module at MC's request.I am going to attempt to develop a better system. Just replacing the pump does nothing to fix the main problem. I had to have a module to work with. Yes, dishing out over $400 ***, but hopefully it will pay for itself if I can get something better out of it. Stay tuned!

jwroblew
07-28-2008, 10:06 PM
boofer that would be great to get a tear down of the system. All I did was check line pressure of my boat after words against a friends, they where pretty damn close, so I figured all was good...

I believe, not sure, the main problem is how the pump works. Electrical pusher fuel pumps in general use gasoline to lube the pump, in a boat there is more movement in the attitude of the tank giving more inaccurate readings of the level in the tank than in an automobile. The low levels of fuel leads to the pumps burning up. Also autos will generally have a low spot in the tank to insure proper lubing, the MC tanks that I have seen have a low spot, but just low enough for the filter to sit in, not enough to insure lubing of the pump. My 2 cents...

macattack
08-17-2009, 02:40 PM
"Now, the special tool. You simply place it on the fuel line coming out of the regulator and push it towards the hose. At the same time, pull on the hose slightly and it should just pop right off. Have a towel under the hose to catch the small amount of fuel that comes out."

The pressure hose will not release...metal clip is off, used the quick disconnect tool (3/8") that looks just like the one in Boofer's picture, but the line is not disconnecting; tried the next size up (1/2") but that didn't fit...any thoughts? tks, mac

wheeler
08-18-2009, 02:46 PM
I believe it to be the blue tool 5/8". I will check because I am about to replace my fuel pump tonight with the AC delco EP356I have the 2004 MCX

I will add that Crow Burlingame indicated the the AC delco EP356 cross referenced back to a Carter P74122.

I chose to go with the AC Delco instead of the Carter. Obviously M/C is using faulty pumps and I'll de damned it I install another one in there....:D

The Carter is one $85.00. The AC Delco is getting me for $130.00

bigmac
08-18-2009, 04:40 PM
I believe it to be the blue tool 5/8". I will check because I am about to replace my fuel pump tonight with the AC delco EP356I have the 2004 MCX

I will add that Crow Burlingame indicated the the AC delco EP356 cross referenced back to a Carter P74122.

I chose to go with the AC Delco instead of the Carter. Obviously M/C is using faulty pumps and I'll de damned it I install another one in there....:D

The Carter is one $85.00. The AC Delco is getting me for $130.00
I'm sure both are fine. I have bought both the AC Delco (which is made by Walbro) and the Airtex E2044 ($94 at Advance Auto) and I'm of the opinion that the Airtex looks better made.

MariStar-Man
08-20-2009, 11:41 PM
great write up. It helped me today replacing the fuel filter. I didn't realize that it just pops off after undiong the 2 spot welded snaps...

macattack
08-26-2009, 05:15 PM
Ref a new fuel module...can you turn the fuel regulator to align it with the exisiting fuel and return lines from the boat or will turning it break the integrity of the regulator's top/bottom rubber seals/gaskets? tks, mac

ncsone
08-26-2009, 05:27 PM
Mac - did you end up replacing the full assembly instead of the pump? I thought, for some reason, that you were going to do a pump replacement only. If so, is that the new generation pump or the OE pump?

macattack
08-26-2009, 06:46 PM
Went the module route, until someone figures out the tubing issue. It's not the Millenium, but it's a newer model than the one I had before since I can see the updated corrugated hose connecting the fuel pump to fuel regulator...mac

macattack
08-28-2009, 11:04 AM
FYI: Ref turning the fuel regualtor to align it...

Talked to a MC mechanic and he said "Yes you can turn it without hurting anything. Do not spin it in a complete circle just turn it enough to align it."

JimN
08-28-2009, 11:17 AM
boofer that would be great to get a tear down of the system. All I did was check line pressure of my boat after words against a friends, they where pretty damn close, so I figured all was good...

I believe, not sure, the main problem is how the pump works. Electrical pusher fuel pumps in general use gasoline to lube the pump, in a boat there is more movement in the attitude of the tank giving more inaccurate readings of the level in the tank than in an automobile. The low levels of fuel leads to the pumps burning up. Also autos will generally have a low spot in the tank to insure proper lubing, the MC tanks that I have seen have a low spot, but just low enough for the filter to sit in, not enough to insure lubing of the pump. My 2 cents...

This is the reason setting Empty when there's no fuel is a bad idea. It should be set so there's a couple of inches in the tank. Cars have a sealed tank and don't pick up much water from the air because of the vapor recovery system. This allows them to use more coarse initial filtering- basically a sock over the pickup. The ethanol affects the old Teflon G-rotor and the water attracted by the ethanol affects the machined aluminum G-rotor. That tells me that using gas with ethanol is a bad thing. Once the filter is clogged by water and run dry with low level, it won't run.

If anyone replaces their pump, make sure it doesn't have a plastic G-rotor.

rhsprostar
08-28-2009, 12:38 PM
Jim
Have you got a pic? Either plastic or metal?
thanks

JimN
08-28-2009, 12:49 PM
Jim
Have you got a pic? Either plastic or metal?
thanks

No pics but the G-rotor material should be in the specs for the pump. It's internal, so I wouldn't recommend disassembling it if it's still close to the warranty period.