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sfitzgerald351
04-18-2005, 11:08 PM
So, after the little discussion we had about grammar on another thread I've been writing down the common errors I've seen that drive me nuts. So here they are along with an explanation of the correct usage... Hopefully this will be helpful to folks. It is not meant to make fun of anyone. I just want folks to be able to write better than the Toolman! :D

Your vs You’re

Your is possessive and means to own something. Your Mastercraft is sweet!

You’re is a contraction for “you are.” You’re going wash the boat today, right?


Its vs It’s

Similar to your and you’re. If you can use “It is” or “It has” you should use “it’s.” Otherwise use “its.”

Its is possessive. With its great wake my Mastercraft is the best ski boat out there.

It’s is a contraction for “it is” or “it has.” It’s a nice day to go water skiing today.


There vs Their vs They’re

“There” indicates a place or a situation. The ski course is over there. There are 3 fins on my Mastercraft.

“They’re” is the contraction of “they are.” If you can substitute “they are” in the sentence, then use “they’re.” They’re the best skiers I know.

“Their” is a plural possessive, that is something belongs to more than one person. If you can substitute more than one name (or thing) and not change the meaning of the sentence, then use “their.” It is Bob and Cindy’s Mastercraft. It is their Mastercraft.


Plural Words and Apostrophes

Never use an apostrophe to indicate the plural of anything. An apostrophe generally indicates possession (with the exception of “its”!) or a contraction of two words (as in “it is” above)

There are 3 Mastercraft’s on my lake is NOT correct
There are 3 Mastercrafts on my lake is correct

It is Bobs ski i] NOT correct
It is Bob’s ski is correct


Lose Vs. Loose Vs. Loss

“To lose” (pronounced “looz”) is the opposite of “to win.” You are losing, you will lose, you lost, you have lost. If you ding your prop you lose performance.

Loose (pronounced “looss”) is the opposite of “tight.” The verb form is to loosen (a bolt, a light bulb, etc.). A loose rudder will make it difficult to steer straight through the course.

Loss is the noun form of the verb “to lose.” The toolman should have bought a Mastercraft instead of a Bayliner. Oh well, it's his loss.

To vs. Too

Just remember that the only meanings of “too” are “also" and “in excess.” Note that extra O. It should remind you that this word has to do with adding more on to something. I want to ski too. Your stereo is too quiet, please install some more subwoofers!

“To” is the proper spelling for all the other uses and usually refers to heading somehwere. We're going to go to the lake this weekend.

Mag_Red
04-18-2005, 11:19 PM
Good post! :headbang:

lakes Rick
04-19-2005, 12:33 AM
Loose (pronounced “looss”) is the opposite of “tight.”

Mag, would you please explain this? I have a feeling it is probably your specialty...............

Leroy
04-19-2005, 12:41 AM
Good one, it goes one and on, sale/sell, bye/by/buy, who/whom, ya'll/you all, every so-so/occasionally/once in a while, role/roll, quiet/quite, git-r-done/working on it, effect/affect, idea/ideal, principal/principle, ..........the English language is really screwed up....without spell checker I am lost.....

sizzler
04-19-2005, 02:07 AM
IT ONLY SEEMS SCREWED-UP GUYS,BECAUSE ITS NOT YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE :uglyhamme

Mag_Red
04-19-2005, 06:11 AM
Mag, would you please explain this? I have a feeling it is probably your specialty...............
:confused: You lost me Rick.............but then again, I just got up.

Cloaked
04-19-2005, 06:36 AM
IT ONLY SEEMS SCREWED-UP GUYS,BECAUSE ITS NOT YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE :uglyhammePoint well taken Mate.... :D

André
04-19-2005, 08:05 AM
Ok Scott ,just for me now.
I need the good spelling cause i'm never sure how to spell them ...
To think at the past and to teach at the past ? Thaught ,tought, ???
Any tricks on how to remember ?
And by the way,anyone can correct me anytime on my English, I won't be offended.
I don't use spellcheck because i'll get lazy about my English spelling!

MarkP
04-19-2005, 09:02 AM
Mag, would you please explain this? I have a feeling it is probably your specialty......................................... ....

:uglyhamme

sizzler
04-19-2005, 09:29 AM
Ok Scott ,just for me now.
I need the good spelling cause i'm never sure how to spell them ...
To think at the past and to teach at the past ? Thaught ,tought, ???
Any tricks on how to remember ?
And by the way,anyone can correct me anytime on my English, I won't be offended.
I don't use spellcheck because i'll get lazy about my English spelling!
WE'LL CORRECT YOU IF YOU CORRECT US ON OUR FRENCH..MON AMI

sfitzgerald351
04-19-2005, 10:01 AM
Ok Scott ,just for me now.
I need the good spelling cause i'm never sure how to spell them ...
To think at the past and to teach at the past ? Thaught ,tought, ???


Unfortunately there aren't a lot of tricks to remembering the silly English rules and words....

To think in the past = Thought. Andre thought it was safe to go get a beer while burning leaves this past weekend.

To teach in the past = taught. Andre taught his son not to light the lawn on fire last weekend

Ric
04-19-2005, 10:15 AM
Unfortunately there aren't a lot of tricks remembering the silly English rules and words....

To think in the past = Thought. Andre thought it was safe to go get a beer while burning leaves this past weekend.

To teach in the past = taught. Andre taught his son not to light the lawn on fire last weekend
I barely have a moment to post a thought and now you guys are going to be checking my grammar ! :eek:

quincyfirefighter
04-19-2005, 10:21 AM
Thanks for the help because my grammar SUCKS :eek3:

Ric
04-19-2005, 10:23 AM
does neatness count too?

east tx skier
04-19-2005, 10:24 AM
Good post, Scott. The sad part is that those rules are just the tip of the iceberg. For instance, you haven't even gotten into the nuances of the semicolan. Oh, and anyone on here want to distinguish the various uses among a hyphen, an endash, and an endash from an emdash.

Oh, and while we're on the subject, as a general rule, if it's something you can count, it's fewer than. If you can't count it, it's less than.

Example. There are fewer than twenty trees in my yard. Compare with the statement, At thirty-one, I have less energy than when I was twenty-one.

There are, of course, exceptions to this rule. It wouldn't be English without exceptions.

DanC
04-19-2005, 11:27 AM
This is fun, can I play?

semicolan.
spelling


Oh, and while we're on the subject, as a general rule, if it's something you can count, it's fewer than. .
pretty good when you can get four commas in a sentence and pass the grammer check :)

Compare with the statement, At thirty-one, I have less energy than when I was twenty-one.
capitalization and punctuation

just busting your balls Doug :toast:

"If we can't kid each other, who can we kid"?

tex
04-19-2005, 11:31 AM
i, here< the? lake: calling;ya"ll guys/

east tx skier
04-19-2005, 11:31 AM
Hey, I didn't say I followed the rules (or proofread anything).

ski_king
04-19-2005, 11:41 AM
I think our friend WakeSeeky says it best in her signiture.


Note: This post may contain misspellings, grammatical errors, disorganized sentence structure, or may entirely lack a coherent theme. These elements are natural to the process of writing and will only add to the overall beauty of the post.

sizzler
04-19-2005, 11:47 AM
i, here< the? lake: calling;ya"ll guys/


WHAT IS THIS......MCGRAMMAR or MC HAMMER :toast:

tex
04-19-2005, 11:59 AM
WHAT IS THIS......MCGRAMMAR or MC HAMMER :toast:
Just a kat with a journalism degree.

dmac
04-19-2005, 01:03 PM
My personal peeve is run on sentences. I have proof read business correspondence that folks want to let out the door and been exhausted at the end of a paragraph. :confused:

sfitzgerald351
04-19-2005, 01:47 PM
Good post, Scott. The sad part is that those rules are just the tip of the iceberg. For instance, you haven't even gotten into the nuances of the semicolan.

There's actually a really amusing book out about, of all things, punctuation! It's called "Eats, Shoots & Leaves" by Lynne Truss who has a very nice dry, witty, British sense of humor. I got it for Christmas and figured it was another book for the library donation pile. But I ran out of books to read on the trip back and started it. It's pretty good! But, of course, it's a bit complicated for us over here in the States because apparently, not only do the British use funny words and spellings for things they also punctuate differently!

east tx skier
04-19-2005, 02:09 PM
We've got it. Very good. Because I make my living writing, I got to go to a writing seminar last year. This person spoke, and it was the best grammar lecture I've ever had (as if there were any contenders). Anyway, here's her website for those so inclined.

Get it Write (http://www.getitwriteonline.com/index.htm)

She's known to answer emails.

sfitzgerald351
04-19-2005, 02:11 PM
Glad the gang isn't offended... I wasn't sure what kind of reaction I'd get. But, communication skills are so critical these days, and knowing how to write well is even more critical given how much email gets used.

One more to add....

To vs. Too

Just remember that the only meanings of “too” are “also" and “in excess.” Note that extra O. It should remind you that this word has to do with adding more on to something. I want to ski too. Your stereo is too quiet, please install some more subwoofers!

“To” is the proper spelling for all the other uses and usually refers to heading somehwere. We're going to go to the lake this weekend.

ktn_cmu
04-19-2005, 02:17 PM
I few I notice and dislike are:

-the use of "don't" when it should be "doesn't" ("He don't know how to launch a boat.")

-"went" when it should be "gone" ("I would have went with him, but he was driving a Dodge.")

-incorrect use of "I" when refering to oneself ("East Tx Skier loaned his boat to Tex and I for a bass festival.")

tex
04-19-2005, 02:21 PM
I few I notice and dislike are:

-the use of "don't" when it should be "doesn't" ("He don't know how to launch a boat.")

-"went" when it should be "gone" ("I would have went with him, but he was driving a Dodge.")

-incorrect use of "I" when refering to oneself ("East Tx Skier loaned his boat to Tex and I for a bass festival.")

LMAO-I am fix'n to clean the fish we caught!

dmac
04-19-2005, 02:31 PM
I few I notice and dislike are:

-the use of "don't" when it should be "doesn't" ("He don't know how to launch a boat.")

-"went" when it should be "gone" ("I would have went with him, but he was driving a Dodge.")

-incorrect use of "I" when refering to oneself ("East Tx Skier loaned his boat to Tex and I for a bass festival.")
Why that's just talkin' redneck there. I'm used to that in these parts.

DanC
04-19-2005, 02:49 PM
Why that's just talkin' redneck there. I'm used to that in these parts.

I believe they refer to that as a "dialect" :purplaugh

Dallas TX engineer quote "We might could replace the Frequency Upconverter if y'all got a backup unit"

east tx skier
04-19-2005, 02:52 PM
Hey, they talk all high-falutin' in Dallas. Head eastward, and you'll hear some things that tend to hurt your ears a little more. Trust me.

aprgriggs
04-19-2005, 02:55 PM
thanks for the english lesson. I needed that.

DanC
04-19-2005, 02:58 PM
Hey, they talk all high-falutin' in Dallas. Head eastward, and you'll hear some things that tend to hurt your ears a little more. Trust me.

Actually it was Greenville, TX. But I didn't think anybody but you would know where that is.

DanC
04-19-2005, 03:00 PM
OK
is it "I used to travel to Texas"
or is it "I use to travel to Texas"
:confused:

Farmer Ted
04-19-2005, 03:08 PM
Actually it was Greenville, TX. But I didn't think anybody but you would know where that is.


I might could loose my mind if I could get a job with L3 at Majors Field.


FT

erkoehler
04-19-2005, 03:09 PM
:uglyhamme :rant:

Brilliant!

ktn_cmu
04-19-2005, 03:46 PM
OK
is it "I used to travel to Texas"
or is it "I use to travel to Texas"
:confused:

We use the verb use in its past tense with an infinitive to indicate a past condition or habitual practice: We used to live on Lake Michigan. Because the -d in used is not pronounced in these constructions, people sometimes mistakenly leave it out when writing. Thus it is incorrect to write We use to have a Dodge, then we sold it. When do occurs with this form of use in negative statements and in questions, the situation is reversed, and use to (not used to) is correct: You did not use to play on that team. Didn’t she use to look good?

tex
04-19-2005, 03:55 PM
The devil lives in Dallas!

G-man
04-19-2005, 04:06 PM
I suggest you stay away from toolman's post.

Since I happen to now live in Texas it drives me crazy to hear," where's it at?" Insted of where is it?

The devil is not in Dallas, he was last headed out of here.

east tx skier
04-19-2005, 04:12 PM
We get a lot of "fixin' to" and "used to could" around here. It's like fingernails on the chalkboard for this English major.

Hey, George, you skiing this weekend?

dmac
04-19-2005, 04:19 PM
I suggest you stay away from toolman's post.

Since I happen to now live in Texas it drives me crazy to hear," where's it at?" Insted of where is it?
Head further east and you will hear "where it is?". And that my friends is only the beginning.

G-man
04-19-2005, 04:54 PM
east texas I will be skiing sometime this weekend. This past weekend I figured out if they gave points for skiing inside the bouys I would be Andy Mapple. I made a whopping 3 bouys this past Saturday, second time out this season.

milkmania
04-19-2005, 04:56 PM
are vs. our

We're going to take are boat to the lake on Saturday.

I've seen that form used many times:(

I don't pick on grammar too much, because at times I overlook my mistakes too:o


but what really peeves me off more than gramm'r???
someone blowing their nose at the dinner table while I'm eatin'!

all my gramm'r is out the door then!:mad::rant:

east tx skier
04-19-2005, 05:30 PM
George, I got a little free skiing in, but we did a one day turnaround trip, and that doesn't leave me time to mess with putting the course in. Hopefully, in two weeks, I'll get to drop it in and see what's what.

erkoehler
04-19-2005, 06:04 PM
About how long does it take you to put in and take out the course?

lakes Rick
04-19-2005, 08:48 PM
:confused: You lost me Rick.............but then again, I just got up.

Cmon Mag, its a joke...... Think about it..........

east tx skier
04-19-2005, 09:09 PM
About how long does it take you to put in and take out the course?

With someone in a john boat and one in the water, my estimate is 20 minutes to put it in and 15 to take it out. Just finding anchors and clipping buoys. It's still a little chilly for me to want to spend too much time floating in the water though.

rasmithaz
04-19-2005, 09:50 PM
We use the verb use in its past tense with an infinitive to indicate a past condition or habitual practice: We used to live on Lake Michigan. Because the -d in used is not pronounced in these constructions, people sometimes mistakenly leave it out when writing. Thus it is incorrect to write We use to have a Dodge, then we sold it. When do occurs with this form of use in negative statements and in questions, the situation is reversed, and use to (not used to) is correct: You did not use to play on that team. Didn’t she use to look good?

We lived on Lake Michigan and had a Dodge that never ran on sentences.

erkoehler
04-19-2005, 10:10 PM
Thanks for the info.

JimN
04-19-2005, 10:35 PM
Doug- if you don't like 'use to could' and fixin' to', how do you feel about 'right quick' and '10 years have came and went'?

NeilM
04-19-2005, 10:40 PM
Diction Guide to Texas


This was sent to me to help me on my recent visits to Dallas & Houston..



AIGG (noun)
Something a fowl (such as hen) lays
Usage: "Ma, how much aigg money ya git this week ?"

AINTS (noun)
An insect thru-out the world; lives in colonies
Usage: "That boy's got aints in his pants"

BAG (verb)
To plead
Usage: "He bagged her to murry him."

BUB (noun)
an incandescent lamp
Usage: "The lite bub done burned out agin'."

CHEER (noun)
A piece of furniture
Usage: "Keep that danged cat outta my cheer."

DAINTZ (noun)
A social event where couples move to music
Usage: "I'm a-gonna go to the Daintz Sattiday nite."

DRASS (verb)
to put on clothing
Usage: "She was drassed fit to kill"

DRECKLY (adverb)
right away; soon
Usage: "Y'all caint get there dreckly from here."

FANCE (noun)
A boundary marker; wood/metal to enclose land
Usage: "Who's that hanging ahrund the fance"

FARRED (noun)
dismissed
Usage: "He got farred from his job."

FLAR (Noun)
A bloom on a plant or bush
Usage: "A Rose is a purty flar."

FURRINERS (noun)
Anyone not from Texas
Usage: "Damn furriners oughtta larn how to drive."

GRAIN (noun)
A color
Usage: "She was grain with envy"

HEP (verb)
to assist
Usage: "Hep me understand this now."

HERN (possessive pronoun)
3rd person feminine
Usage: "It ain't his'n, it's her'n."

LAK (conjunction)
similar
Usage: "Dog's so plum lazy, it's lak he'd ruther sleep than eat."

NAR (adjective)
of limited width
Usage: "Damn door's a-getin' too nar to fit thru."

NACK (verb)
to kiss
Usage: "Let's sat a bit on the parch and nack."

NUP (adverb)
Negative response
Usage: "When she axed me out, I just said 'nup'."

ORMY (noun)
A branch of the military
Usage: "We Texans are willin' to fat in the Ormy."

PURDY (adjective)
pleasing or attractive
Usage: "That Sally-Mae's one right prudy filly."

RAH CHEER (adverb)
in this place
Usage: "I was borned rah cheer in this town."

RANG (noun)
a circular band
Usage: "Danged fool aisked Sally-Mae to murry him then couldn't ford no rang."

RAT NOW (adverb)
immediately
Usage: "I sed go git 'em boy, rat now."

SHAR (noun)
A brief period of rain
Usage: "Wish-in' it wud shar some and cooled thangs off a bit."

SHURF (noun)
a local or county law enforcement officer
Usage: "Hey Ma! Here comes the Shurf."

TARD (noun)
fatigued
Usage: "I'm-ah plum tard out."

THANK (verb)
Ability to cognitively process
Usage: "Ah thank ah'll have some mailk." WORSH (verb)
To cleanse
Usage: "Boy -- go worsh-up for supper."