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Jerseydave
05-30-2008, 02:47 PM
Ok, so I've been searching for a used skyski and found one with a cast foil, not billet.

Question: will this foil be good for a beginner like me until I hone my skills enough after a few years?

ShamrockIV
05-30-2008, 02:52 PM
dude from what i have heard it will be plenty good!!!! they are tough to learn!!! lean forward!!! and then more forward!!!!!!!!

bigmac
05-30-2008, 03:50 PM
It depends on the foil design, not on whether it's cast or not. Is this an actual Sky Ski brand or an Air Chair?

Air Chairs have a cast foil and I think they're easier to learn on than any of the Sky Skis, but even that depends on what model and vintage of Air Chair.

Need more info. What brand? Which model? How old?

ShamrockIV
05-30-2008, 03:51 PM
be carefull. as with all sports air chair can hurt u!! one of my buddies got a concussion lst weekend on one. he even had helmet on!! be carefull!!!

Jerseydave
05-30-2008, 10:26 PM
Bigmac, it's a Skyski about 8-9 years old with cast foil. Has cinchmax foot stays and a new belt. Looks to be in good shape, price $650. Sounds like a good deal to me, plus I could always upgrade in a few years and sell it on e-bay.

What do you think?

TOO-TALL
05-30-2008, 10:48 PM
njskier

Sounds like good deal to me too.For a beginner that would be a good first ski.And like you said it has Cinch footstays and a new belt(cinch belt??).
In a few years(I mean months) you could put it on ebay and almost get your money back then upgrade.

A few tips on getting up...
-16-20 mph
-use a deep-V handle.
-keep the tip of the board up.
-look up at the tower.
-Hands on knees.
-DO NOT PULL ON HANDLE!!!! Let the boat do the work.
-As soon as the board pops up on the surface of the water lean way forward and have your hands up...it looks goofy but this trick works.
-Just ride around with the board on the water.
-once you feel comfortable start to straighten your back up.Don't lean back too far.
-Then slowly bring in the handle so your elbows are at your side
-Don't try and "muscle"the ski..Be smooth.
-If you feel things gett'n outta controll. Hands up and lean forward.That's your "saftey zone"

REMEMBER
-Handle up=makes the board go down.
-Handle down=makes the board go up.
-Steer with your Knees.

Did I miss anything Bigmac??

Laurel_Lake_Skier
05-30-2008, 11:06 PM
I've got a Sky Ski that is about 4 years old and has the cast foil. We really enjoy it and it will still be a while before I need to upgrade. It sounds like the one you are looking has some nice additions to it. I'd say you will be able to get quite a bit of use from it before you are ready to move up. If the Sky Ski is kept in good shape, they also seem to hold their value pretty well. Be sure there are no nicks or chips taken out of the foils or strut.....it only takes a small change in their shapes to cause big problems in handling.

I'll warn you in advance, they are a ton of fun and you will be putting plenty of hours on your boat towing it. In the learning stages (its not that hard to learn) you will be going quite slow....maybe 12mph and it would be pretty hard to hurt yourself.

You might want to ask questions about this particular foil (find out the exact model) at http://www.foilforum.com/forums/

tex
05-31-2008, 12:19 AM
Ok, so I've been searching for a used skyski and found one with a cast foil, not billet.

Question: will this foil be good for a beginner like me until I hone my skills enough after a few years?

Buy it and ride it!

Jerseydave
05-31-2008, 07:56 AM
Too-Tall, thanks for the tips.

LLS, I'm on foilforum already. Nice people over there.

Tex, I'm going to buy it!

bigmac
05-31-2008, 08:23 AM
Without knowing the specific foil, hard to know about its suitability as a learning device, but the two things that make learning hardest, IMHO, is a foil that's got too much lift and a foil that's too responsive. You can always kill some lift by shimming the rear wing and/or tying a piece of string around the strut, and you may find that helpful. You'll find, as you start out, that the foil will start to come out of the water and keep taking you up and up until you fall over to one side or the other. And if the foil is too responsive, you'll be doing a lot of porpoising in the early stages. It can be a very frustrating learning curve.

I taught a number of buddies on my Stealth Air Chair. When I switched to a Sky Ski B39, I found that I enjoyed it a lot more, but I couldn't teach anyone else to ride it without taking a wrench and completely reconfiguring it. I conclude that a hotter foil like the B39 isn't a good learning device, although I admit it may also be my lack of skill as a teacher, and the older foil you're talking about may not have the same problems.

Good luck. I do agree that hydrofoiling is an absolute blast and very addictive. The biggest problem with it in my case is the cumbersome-ness of the device. I don't have a tower rack for it, so it sits on the floor of the boat and it takes up a lot of room, not to mention toe-stubbing potential. For us, it's a simple matter to just swing by the dock and drop the thing off. For storage, I've rigged a rack on inside of the canopy of my boat lift.

Jerseydave
06-02-2008, 01:36 PM
Thanks for your input Bigmac! I did ride an airchair about 18 years ago and thought it was a blast, just couldn't justify the cost at that time.

Now that I'm older (and so are my knees) I can't wait to learn how to ride one. I should be able to learn okay, since I can do everything from slalom, wakeboard, wakesurf and barefoot. I'm also going to a mini-flyin in July in PA where some other foilers can give me some help.

They seem to hold their value, so if I need to upgrade in a few years I'll put this one on e-bay.

RACKS, has anyone fabricated one or had a machinist make one? I know I can buy one (over $400). How about using the wakeboard racks on my X-star plus fabricating another support higher up for the strut? I may have to look into that once I get the ski.

bigmac
06-02-2008, 02:40 PM
Now that I'm older (and so are my knees) I can't wait to learn how to ride one.

Bad knees are an excellent reason for hydrofoiling, certainly one of the most common.


I should be able to learn okay, since I can do everything from slalom, wakeboard, wakesurf and barefoot.

Ho ho. I've heard that one before.

I'm also going to a mini-flyin in July in PA where some other foilers can give me some help.

A flyin with good one-on-one teaching would definitely be a great place to learn. I didn't have that luxury, had to teach myself from Bob Woolley's video that came with the Air Chair.


They seem to hold their value, so if I need to upgrade in a few years I'll put this one on e-bay.

Yes. I bought the Air Chair I started on new on ebay for $1100. I sold it on ebay two years later for a little over $1000.


RACKS, has anyone fabricated one or had a machinist make one? I know I can buy one (over $400). How about using the wakeboard racks on my X-star plus fabricating another support higher up for the strut? I may have to look into that once I get the ski.

If I had a tower, I would certainly bite the bullet and get a hydrofoil rack for it, but I don't. I've toyed with the idea of getting a machinist to make one that mounts on the stainless steel rails in the bow so I could store the thing up there rather than in the walkway, but that would be spendy too.

Jerseydave
06-03-2008, 05:51 PM
I'll be foilin' real soon!

Just purchased a used Skyski Pro from a nice couple in Ohio, being shipped to me now. Hopefully I get it by the weekend. 8p

91ps190
06-07-2008, 02:30 PM
Your gonna love it. But do yourself a favor and spend the bucks right away on a comptech rack with swivels. Your boat and back will love you for it. It's expensive but what on a boat isn't.

hydrofoilmaniac
06-07-2008, 03:19 PM
I'll be foilin' real soon!

Just purchased a used Skyski Pro from a nice couple in Ohio, being shipped to me now. Hopefully I get it by the weekend. 8p
Buying the SS was the right choice. I started out on an AC and then swithched to a SS (Pro S/t - 2-piece billet) after a couple seasons. Then, I upgraded again at the end of the season in 2005 to a SS LE38 (4.5K ski). Since then, I've updated front wings twice ($600 a pop) and seats a couple times. The bottom line is, once you get going it's ADDICTIVE.

First, you'll try a few jumps. Then you'll try to get higher and higher and higher. Soon after that, you'll want to start throwing inverts. I've been skiing all of my life (trick, slalom, barefoot, etc) and there is NOTHING more addictive than this sport.

You can go to my website for a little info http://hydrofoilmaniacs.com/

In particular, look at the "Safety" page. It's important to have the right equipment.

Also, join this forum http://www.foilforum.com. Lots of great stuff.

Contact me if you have any questions.

Jerseydave
06-08-2008, 08:38 AM
Well my ski arrived friday, just in time for some great riding saturday.
I was able to get up second try, got a feel for using my knees to steer, shift my weight forward to stay on the ski and shift back to ride the foil. I could also get the feel of raising and lower the handle to control the way the ski rides too.

I was able to ride the foil out of the water for a good period of time and I could also cut across the wakes while up on the foil. Man this thing is great! Can't wait to get some more seat time and also get some face-to-face coaching at the end of July at the Raystown Lake mini fly-in.

Any tips on stopping the porposing effect when the foil comes to the water's surface? I assume I should not let that happen and just come about 3/4 of the way out of the water.

BTW hydrofoilmaniac, I already have Cinch footstays and a Cinchmax belt, and I'm using a non-strech wakeboard rope. Next thing I need is a Cinch rope release.

Has anyone tried hanging their ski from a factory wakeboard rack? Mine fits on the X-star rack, I just need to bungee the foil to the front tower leg for more security. (I only tried it yesterday with the boat on the trailer, maybe next time I'll hang it there while running on the water)

hydrofoilmaniac
06-08-2008, 09:31 AM
Any tips on stopping the porposing effect when the foil comes to the water's surface? I assume I should not let that happen and just come about 3/4 of the way out of the water.


Correct. Just don't ride with the wings so close to the surface of the water.

bigmac
06-08-2008, 09:55 AM
Well my ski arrived friday, just in time for some great riding saturday.
I was able to get up second try, got a feel for using my knees to steer, shift my weight forward to stay on the ski and shift back to ride the foil. I could also get the feel of raising and lower the handle to control the way the ski rides too.

I was able to ride the foil out of the water for a good period of time and I could also cut across the wakes while up on the foil. Man this thing is great! Can't wait to get some more seat time and also get some face-to-face coaching at the end of July at the Raystown Lake mini fly-in.

Any tips on stopping the porposing effect when the foil comes to the water's surface? I assume I should not let that happen and just come about 3/4 of the way out of the water.

BTW hydrofoilmaniac, I already have Cinch footstays and a Cinchmax belt, and I'm using a non-strech wakeboard rope. Next thing I need is a Cinch rope release.

Has anyone tried hanging their ski from a factory wakeboard rack? Mine fits on the X-star rack, I just need to bungee the foil to the front tower leg for more security. (I only tried it yesterday with the boat on the trailer, maybe next time I'll hang it there while running on the water)

When the wing hits the surface, obviously it loses lift and drops you, the sudden increased drag pulls you a little forward, foil dives, and down you go. Getting too high on the foil is one of those things you have to guard against. If you find that you're having to lean too far forward, or use too much foot pressure to stay down, you can kill some lift by shimming the rear of the rear foil a little. I use a piece of a credit card between the T-bar and wing. A dime is also a commonly used shim.

I've carried my B39 in a wakeboard rack on my buddy's X10. It's a little narrow, but works OK. If you stay with foiling (likely), I think you're going to want to get a nice hydrofoil rack.

Jerseydave
06-08-2008, 08:15 PM
Thanks for the tip about the shim, the guy before me had a dime there as a shim but I wanted to try it without first. I think I just need practice alot with it to find that "sweet spot". It's going to be a great summer.

BTW, I was only riding at around 14 mph just to get a feel. After a few more times I'll pick up the speed a bit. What speed do most people ride at before they try inverts?

hydrofoilmaniac
06-08-2008, 08:21 PM
I foil at 25 mph. You could probably work up to 19 or 20 and hold there for awhile. Most will say that learning the right technique at lower speeds is best.

bigmac
06-08-2008, 09:52 PM
I have Perfect Pass set at 20 mph. My wife does a great job pulling. We only make right turns because left turns cause the boat to speed up.

When you do get up to 20, you might want that dime back.