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j.e.1975
05-01-2008, 11:59 PM
I'm looking at a 1989 prostar 190 with 2000 hours. I haven't had much to do with this type of boat. I know this is alot of hours but should it cause concern and what questions should I ask. The current owner has had it since 1992 and should know the history of the boat. I've only seem pictures so far, but it looks in good shape and includes the original trailer. It needs some interior work. What would be a realistic price. Thanks in advance for any information and help.

thanks
j.e.1975

hester
05-02-2008, 07:50 AM
Welcome to the board.

I'm a big fan of the pre-purchase inspection by someone with solid inboard knowledge (and preferably MC knowledge). Here are a couple of threads that discuss hours.

http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=13216

http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=13983

stuartmcnair
05-03-2008, 11:32 AM
my 1989 Prostar 190 has 658 hours on it for reference. I bought it last summer for $8,500. Everything on the boat was in immaculate condition. Only real problem I have had since then is I had to replace the carb.

EricB
05-03-2008, 12:37 PM
2000 hour is alot of hours on a boat engine. If it has held up that long, you can be assured that it has been well taken care of and treated well.
In my line of work, I always get the question of how hours equates to miles. This is the example I use...Note: Individuals can manipulate the numbers anyway they desire, the gist of the formula is the load factor.

1. On average, running a car at 3000 rpm would equal approx. 75 mph.
2. 75 mph X 100 hrs = 7500 mi.

However, the duty cycle (% of full load) is approx. 20% in a car.
Over-The -Road trucks is 50%
Boats are anyware from 70 to 100% (WOT is full load, max power engine can produce).

So if you multiply the mileage of a car times the duty cycle, you get some interesting figures:
100 boat hrs now becomes closer to 30,000 car miles (7500 X 4, at 80% load factor)
500 hrs now becomes closer to 150,000. 1000 can equate to 300,000 and so on....

When doing the numbers on a boat, it is important to consider where the throttle is most of the time. There is a linear correlation of load vs. RPM. If you spend the majority of your time skiing at 34 mph, this equates to about 3400 rpm. Generally the max rpm is about 4400, so your load factor (duty cycle) would be about 77%.
So do the math however you would like. Just consider that there is no pat answer and there is the load factor to consider.
Again I will say that if a boat has 2000 hrs on the engine and has not been touched, then it probably has been well cared for.

barefoot
05-03-2008, 04:07 PM
EricB, nice work! I like the fact that your formula takes more into consideration then just hours to miles.

I'm going to echo hester...get a PPI (Pre Purchase Inspection). For a couple hundred bucks, they'll do a complete run down on the boat giving you some valuable information. The most important is the engine compression. It'll tell you how efficiently you're engine is running. You're looking for even compression in all cylinders. Low compression in one cylinder will tell you that you might have a bad exhaust valve. Loss compression in two adjacent valves will tell you a bad head gasket. Low compression in all the cylinders will tell you that the rings and cylinders are worn and an engine rebuild will be in your future.

They should be able to do simple tests to isolate the problem to determine if it's an exhaust valve, head gasket, etc.

My thought...if you're seriously looking at this boat, a PPI will give you piece of mind. I mean, for a couple hundred bucks, it's a cheap insurance policy to protect yourself from the unknown.

T Scott
05-03-2008, 05:31 PM
I'm looking at a 1989 prostar 190 with 2000 hours. I haven't had much to do with this type of boat. I know this is alot of hours but should it cause concern and what questions should I ask. The current owner has had it since 1992 and should know the history of the boat. I've only seem pictures so far, but it looks in good shape and includes the original trailer. It needs some interior work. What would be a realistic price. Thanks in advance for any information and help.

thanks
j.e.1975

What is the price point of this boat? A 500-1000 hour 1987-1990 Prostar 190 can usually be had for $6500 to $9500. If this boat is not drastically less expensive, I'd keep looking. Plenty of lower hour boats out there.

stuartmcnair
05-03-2008, 11:44 PM
What is the price point of this boat? A 500-1000 hour 1987-1990 Prostar 190 can usually be had for $6500 to $9500. If this boat is not drastically less expensive, I'd keep looking. Plenty of lower hour boats out there.

I agree. Just keep an eye out.

BriEOD
05-04-2008, 02:32 AM
I sold my 87 PS 190 last fall for $10K. With that said, we replaced the long block in 02' and overall the motor had approximately 400 hours on it. Moreover, the boat was in great condition.

I have a friend with an 88 PS 190 with 3500 hours on the original motor!! It is still going strong.

Personally, I don't think I would buy a boat with over a 1,000 hours on the motor that is close to 20 years old. Keep looking, you will find something.

j.e.1975
05-05-2008, 04:08 PM
Thanks for the info so far. I talked with the owner and it sounds like the boat has been taken care of, regular sevice and fogged for the off season. What other things should I be looking at, transmission, steering and drive line. What fails and how do you check. Is there any options to look for and anything to avoid. Was there any motor/transmission options for the older prostars. Any info is welcome as I'm new to the mastercraft scene.
Thanks
j.e.1975

C36
05-05-2008, 07:14 PM
There is some information here (http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=257514&postcount=47) that might be of interest (used boat buyers checklist in the FAQ's). I hope this is helpful.

Thanks for the info so far. I talked with the owner and it sounds like the boat has been taken care of, regular sevice and fogged for the off season. What other things should I be looking at, transmission, steering and drive line. What fails and how do you check. Is there any options to look for and anything to avoid. Was there any motor/transmission options for the older prostars. Any info is welcome as I'm new to the mastercraft scene.
Thanks
j.e.1975

kjohnson
05-09-2008, 10:04 AM
I have a 91 with 450 hrs.

Sodar
05-09-2008, 10:17 AM
Thanks for the info so far. I talked with the owner and it sounds like the boat has been taken care of, regular sevice and fogged for the off season. What other things should I be looking at, transmission, steering and drive line. What fails and how do you check. Is there any options to look for and anything to avoid. Was there any motor/transmission options for the older prostars. Any info is welcome as I'm new to the mastercraft scene.
Thanks
j.e.1975

Sounds like you have already made your decision about buying a high hour boat. From what I have heard, with good maintenance the typical lifespan around 2500 hours. At this time, anything can go wrong. Compression can be down or gone in cylinders, valves could be sticking, etc. etc. etc. I would take this boat to a mechanic and ask him what he sees going wrong. Either way, in about 500-1000 hours, you will rebuilding the motor and at that time, you might as well do the transmission. Since you are from Ontario, I would suspect that with the 2 month long summers, that 500 hours would take you about 5 seasons to get to, so you will not need to worry about breaking out the $$$$ for a few years! :D Good Luck and get the boat checked out by a mechanic... it will be your best $200 spent.