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PeteS
04-05-2005, 09:44 AM
On my first outime on the lake of the year, at an idle speed we banged the prop on what appeares to be a large rock. One blade is bent significantly, with the rest still in tack.

I'll be sending the prop out for repair shortly, but I'm curious if anything else was damaged including, but not limited to, the strut, shaft, or alignment. I got the boat out of gear almost instantly, but with the damanegd prop, it vibrated and rattled slightly going into gear - I engaged it 3 times, and idled slowley back to the launch.

The shaft still turns freely by hand, and there doesn't appear to be any play between the strut and the shaft. Visually, the shaft looks straight, and the alignment looks fine.

I'll be putting the spare on and water testing it today or tommorrow. Should I be concerened of other damages, or did the prop most likely absorb the energy created from impact? Thanks!

jsonova99
04-05-2005, 09:48 AM
On my first outime on the lake of the year, at an idle speed we banged the prop on what appeares to be a large rock. One blade is bent significantly, with the rest still in tack.

I'll be sending the prop out for repair shortly, but I'm curious if anything else was damaged including, but not limited to, the strut, shaft, or alignment. I got the boat out of gear almost instantly, but with the damanegd prop, it vibrated and rattled slightly going into gear - I engaged it 3 times, and idled slowley back to the launch.

The shaft still turns freely by hand, and there doesn't appear to be any play between the strut and the shaft. Visually, the shaft looks straight, and the alignment looks fine.

I'll be putting the spare on and water testing it today or tommorrow. Should I be concerened of other damages, or did the prop most likely absorb the energy created from impact? Thanks!

I did the same thing last year, only I hit the concrete ramp. Mine had a horrible vibration. I bent all three blades, too. I bought a new prop and I have no sign of any vibration at any speed. I wouldn't worry, the prop probably took all of it.

nashvillematt
04-05-2005, 10:46 AM
I would not worry about it. I have hit every tree stump and rock in the Cumberland River. Got them reworked....just like new.

I think that a prop is almost like a sheer pin on a PTO driven implement.....it gives, so everything else does not have to...

east tx skier
04-05-2005, 11:08 AM
My understanding of things is you have to hit something pretty hard to bend the shaft. Hitting a channel marker at 27 mph will bend the shaft severely. At idle, I'd presume you have less to wory about.

bcampbe7
04-05-2005, 11:21 AM
My understanding of things is you have to hit something pretty hard to bend the shaft. Hitting a channel marker at 27 mph will bend the shaft severely. At idle, I'd presume you have less to wory about.

That's a pretty precise calculation. You must have expreience. :uglyhamme
Just messing with you, and I hope I have not jsut jinxed myself.

east tx skier
04-05-2005, 11:48 AM
Unfortunately, the whole experience is burned in my memory. The worst part was it wasn't even my MasterCraft. :eek3:

ski36short
04-05-2005, 01:50 PM
Pete, bummer dude! Welcome to the new lake huh! I would guess your prop took most or all of the damage - sounds like a minor hit. Keep us posted on how the repaired Acme works out. No one with a hammer can replace CNC'ed precision... I've never seen one but I heard the blades were pretty thin??

This weekend I hope to get my boat ready to go. Just in time to go out of town for the week.

east tx skier
04-05-2005, 03:02 PM
Pete, as mentioned, repairing a CNC'd prop isn't a job for just any prop repair tech. I believe Acme has a couple of businesses they recommend for the job.

BrianM
04-05-2005, 05:01 PM
I would just send it back to Acme so you know that it is done right. I think the do the repairs for $85.

Bummer about the damage. That is the beauties of my lake. Nothing on the bottom but mud.

6ballsisall
04-05-2005, 05:27 PM
Can you re-do the CNC props or are they toast when you beat them up?

east tx skier
04-05-2005, 05:35 PM
According to Acme, they can be refurbished. I agree with Brian, since it's an Acme, let them do it. If it were an OJ, I'd say send it to them. The manufacturer more than likely knows its product better than anyone else.

This is a quote from their website.

"In the same way that technological advances in the automotive industry have brought about changes in service for automobiles, Acme Propellers are somewhat new to the propeller repair industry. Even though Acme Propellers have a unique look, there is really no difference in the way they are repaired. As can be expected, it is not possible to return an Acme Propeller to perfectly new condition, because this would require maintaining tolerances of plus or minus the thickness of a human hair. However, in most cases, it is easier to repair an Acme Propeller, because of the accuracy and consistency built into the propellers and pitch blocks from the start. Propeller blade thicknesses, for example, are consistent and virtually identical to one another.
You may want to inform your repairperson that both Pesco Inc. (Ph. 800-835-6007) and Rundquist Propeller Tools Inc. (Ph. 314-638-7667) are producing pitch blocks for the correct repair of Acme Propellers. Please be advised that some of the original CNC tool lines, which are a product of the CNC manufacturing process, may be altered or removed upon repair. This in particular will not hamper the performance of the propeller.
Keep in mind that the repair of any propeller, worth repairing, is only as good as the shop that repairs it. Regarding Acme Inboard Wake & Ski Boat propellers, if you are unable to find a good repair shop in your area, preferably one that is certified by the NMPA, you can call us for an RMA number, and send your propeller back to Acme Marine. We have been repairing Acme Propellers for quite some time now and have encountered absolutely no repairability issues. Furthermore, if your repairperson has any questions or concerns about the correct repair of an Acme Propeller, ask them to give us a call. We are happy to help."

PeteS
04-06-2005, 09:36 AM
Thanks to all for the reply's, sorry I didn't get back to the thread yesterday.

Nice first day on the lake, right Geoff? Which I guess answers a couple other questions as well, first being the lake is thawed, and secondly my Grand Prix didn't have a problem launching and towing the boat SLOWLY. Oh well, new lake, you live and you learn. I've had a tour now and learned the danger areas - what I hit was a large sunken cinder block, 4' x 3' x 3, which typically has a buoy above it.

I'm thinking of sending the prop back to Acme for repair. Like stated, they have the most experience with CNC'd propellars overall. Good to hear that thoughts are only the prop was damaged. I was concerned that because of the strength gains of the blades due to the milling in the manufacturing process, it might not absorb the energy created from impact.

Everything ran fine yesterday with the spare prop, so I'm guessing all is well. Thanks again.

jsonova99
04-06-2005, 10:01 AM
Thanks to all for the reply's, sorry I didn't get back to the thread yesterday.

Nice first day on the lake, right Geoff? Which I guess answers a couple other questions as well, first being the lake is thawed, and secondly my Grand Prix didn't have a problem launching and towing the boat SLOWLY. Oh well, new lake, you live and you learn. I've had a tour now and learned the danger areas - what I hit was a large sunken cinder block, 4' x 3' x 3, which typically has a buoy above it.

I'm thinking of sending the prop back to Acme for repair. Like stated, they have the most experience with CNC'd propellars overall. Good to hear that thoughts are only the prop was damaged. I was concerned that because of the strength gains of the blades due to the milling in the manufacturing process, it might not absorb the energy created from impact.

Everything ran fine yesterday with the spare prop, so I'm guessing all is well. Thanks again.

Good to hear everything is OK. :toast: