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shepherd
04-16-2008, 08:00 PM
My wife ripped out the tile over our kitchen counter backsplash. Now I have to replace the drywall where she left big gaping holes. :mad: My question is this: If we plan on tiling over the wall after I replace the drywall, do I still need to finish the drywall? Do I need to tape up the seams, apply the mud, and smooth it out? Or can I just lay the tile over the unfinished seams?

Probably a dumb question, but there it is...

TIA

bobbyB
04-16-2008, 08:09 PM
I wouldn't put drywall behind tile. That's a "tear out and replace" later on when the drywall get wet behind the tile.

I'd definately use a tile backer product like: http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=11729-325-11729

Or: http://www.jameshardie.com/homeowner/backerboard.shtml

The tile will adhere to the tile backer better....sometimes the tile will tear off the paper facing on the drywall.

my .02

coz
04-16-2008, 08:18 PM
My wife ripped out the tile over our kitchen counter backsplash. Now I have to replace the drywall where she left big gaping holes. :mad: My question is this: If we plan on tiling over the wall after I replace the drywall, do I still need to finish the drywall? Do I need to tape up the seams, apply the mud, and smooth it out? Or can I just lay the tile over the unfinished seams?

Probably a dumb question, but there it is...

TIA

Get green board, same as drywall but for wet areas and put it the area and tape and mud roughly, doesn't need to be smooth but you do need to seal the joints because believe it or not that could be a draft area if it's open and grout doesn't seal or later is worn or chipping. Then the tile guy can set the wire and plumb & level the tile as he goes. Or if it's just one tile butter the back of the tile and slap it on.

rodltg2
04-16-2008, 09:01 PM
or just put in granite slab, and not worry about it! as long as the damage isn't too bad a granite splash can be installed no problem.

economy is in the tank, im sure you get granite put it for the same price as tile was 2 years ago.

TX.X-30 fan
04-16-2008, 09:15 PM
Get green board, same as drywall but for wet areas and put it the area and tape and mud roughly, doesn't need to be smooth but you do need to seal the joints because believe it or not that could be a draft area if it's open and grout doesn't seal or later is worn or chipping. Then the tile guy can set the wire and plumb & level the tile as he goes. Or if it's just one tile butter the back of the tile and slap it on.



I like rod's option, You do need to repair the rock if tile is the option. I would not use green board if you can even find the stuff anymore. The paper on green board promotes mold growth worse that regular rock. There are new Sheetrock options for wet area installations HD and Loews both carry them.

I would not go to the expense or pain of backer board, I mean really how wet does a backsplash get?? The answer is not at all. Just slap some new rock in there and mud it like someone said no need for perfection.

Look at the tumbled stuff on backer mesh, some cool stuff out there now, and don't be afraid to go where the tile pro's go, much better selection that the home stores and your neighbor wont have the same stuff.

shepherd
04-16-2008, 09:26 PM
We're getting a new Cambria quartz countertop with backsplash. But we're going to put tile on the wall between the backsplash and the bottoms of the cabinets.

The existing wall there is regular drywall. The builder put a single row of decorative tile at the top of the old counter's backsplash. I'm replacing a 6 in x 12 ft section of the drywall that got ruined when those tiles were ripped out. There was also a 2' x 2' section of "mural" tiles we had to rip out and replace the drywall. Then I'm just going to run new tile all the way up to the cabinets.

I got some of that water- and mildew- resistant wallboard at Lowes today. I guess "rough-mudding" the seams of the patches is required, but nothing more. Right?

Monte
04-16-2008, 09:31 PM
I got some of that water- and mildew- resistant wallboard at Lowes today. I guess "rough-mudding" the seams of the patches is required, but nothing more. Right?

Exactly shep. Just caulk the edges when you are done laying the tile and grouting.. Make sure to use a good grout sealer..

TX.X-30 fan
04-16-2008, 09:50 PM
Pic of the Cambria Quartz????????????


Way to be cutting edge Shepherd, and I'm sitting here with crappy old granite! :mad:

TX.X-30 fan
04-16-2008, 09:58 PM
Woops?.....

shepherd
04-16-2008, 10:03 PM
I was happy with the existing kitchen. This was my wife's idea. Like the old laminate countertop wasn't good enough. :rolleyes:
Now we need new drywall and tile. I knew I'd get dragged into this somehow... :(

Monte
04-16-2008, 10:10 PM
I was happy with the existing kitchen. This was my wife's idea. Like the old laminate countertop wasn't good enough. :rolleyes:
Now we need new drywall and tile. I knew I'd get dragged into this somehow... :(

Look on the bright side.. You get new tools out of the deal;) .. Right?:confused:

Slinkyredfoot
04-16-2008, 10:13 PM
I was happy with the existing kitchen. This was my wife's idea. Like the old laminate countertop wasn't good enough. :rolleyes:
Now we need new drywall and tile. I knew I'd get dragged into this somehow... :(


Yea, we all get dragged into stuff like this, but now that you are in this relax and enjoy the headaches....:D I know just what you are talking about.

I had the same thing here last winter, rough spackle, sand, and caulk the joints and it will be fine. Back splashes see little water and moisture unless you use the kitchen sink as hot tub with the wife....:cool:

TX.X-30 fan
04-16-2008, 10:38 PM
Let you femine side take over and enjoy. :D

trunderw
04-16-2008, 11:00 PM
Don't you put some sort of hardybacker behind tile anyway? Just put that up and tile right onto it.

trunderw
04-16-2008, 11:01 PM
Yea, we all get dragged into stuff like this, but now that you are in this relax and enjoy the headaches....:D I know just what you are talking about.

I had the same thing here last winter, rough spackle, sand, and caulk the joints and it will be fine. Back splashes see little water and moisture unless you use the kitchen sink as hot tub with the wife....:cool:

Wow, how big us your sink ;)

FHT0126
04-16-2008, 11:12 PM
Dear shepard,
I remodel kitchens for a living and all you need to do is install new moisture resistant drywall and then apply that self stick mesh tape to your seams and then tile away. Mastic acts as mud for the tape. I have ripped out 25 year old kitchen backsplashes and have never run into water damage no need for tile backer board in this situation. Hope this helps. Have a good one.

stuartmcnair
04-16-2008, 11:46 PM
Dear shepard,
I remodel kitchens for a living and all you need to do is install new moisture resistant drywall and then apply that self stick mesh tape to your seams and then tile away. Mastic acts as mud for the tape. I have ripped out 25 year old kitchen backsplashes and have never run into water damage no need for tile backer board in this situation. Hope this helps. Have a good one.

I'll second that. If you were doing a ten foot high bathroom wall with big heavy tiles you would need to use something more substantial than drywall but for a backsplash it will be fine. Just be careful not to put the screws too far in to push through the paper. You might also consider using a little liquid nails on the rock to give it a little extra strength. The wife has been trying to get me to do this project at our house as well so I feel your pain.

roddydog
04-16-2008, 11:59 PM
Too late again:mad:
What the guys above say... Done a lot of renos (or is that re-NOHS).
Tape with the mesh and then tile (like FHTSCJ105 (or whatever) says).

You HAVE to at least TAPE the seams or they may split.

shepherd
04-17-2008, 12:19 AM
Look on the bright side.. You get new tools out of the deal;) .. Right?:confused:

Already got the tools. This ain't the first time... :noface: (just the first kitchen wall job)

Thanks for the input guys!

shepherd
04-17-2008, 12:23 AM
I also found out a few weeks ago that the guy who built my house used regular dry wall under the tile in the shower. :(
The entire shower and tub area will have to be re-tiled, including new backer board in place of the old rotten drywall. This kitchen project is just a warm-up.

As far as new tools go, I will be buying a power tile cutting saw.

Monte
04-17-2008, 12:27 AM
I also found out a few weeks ago that the guy who built my house used regular dry wall under the tile in the shower. :(
The entire shower and tub area will have to be re-tiled, including new backer board in place of the old rotten drywall. This kitchen project is just a warm-up.

As far as new tools go, I will be buying a power tile cutting saw.

Get the good slide model.. That is the best advice I can give you..

shepherd
04-17-2008, 12:30 AM
I got a good manual sliding one years ago after trashing the cheap one I bought. But this time I'm looking to get one of those power saws that operate like a table saw, but with the hose attachment. I rented one once. It worked great.

Monte
04-17-2008, 12:36 AM
See I knew it!

Man Law: The price of a wife's whim should always equal the purchase of a new toy

sand2snow22
04-17-2008, 01:28 AM
We're getting a new Cambria quartz countertop with backsplash. But we're going to put tile on the wall between the backsplash and the bottoms of the cabinets.


Last year we remodeled our kitchen and went with a Cambria-Sussex countertop, but no Cambria backsplash. For the backsplash we did subway tile. Turned out nice. We tiled over regular drywall. Sealed the tile and grout 3 times, caulked in between the countertop & backsplash and caulked the corners. No problems thus far.

I was looking on the Cambria website and you even get a LEED point for a Cambria countertop, impressive! About two blocks away from my house they make countertops out of recycled glass. They look really sharp, no pun intended, except I hear they don't hold up to heat like quartz does. Maybe better suited for a bathroom?

www.fuez.com

TX.X-30 fan
04-17-2008, 09:56 AM
I also found out a few weeks ago that the guy who built my house used regular dry wall under the tile in the shower. :(
The entire shower and tub area will have to be re-tiled, including new backer board in place of the old rotten drywall. This kitchen project is just a warm-up.

As far as new tools go, I will be buying a power tile cutting saw.




Same dumb *** built my house. :D I tore it all out before one shower. He also provided a whole 6" of shower pan. :mad:

snork
04-17-2008, 11:52 AM
IMHO
Ditch the one piece backsplash because your builder probably did not frame a straight wall. Your wall probably has more waves in it than a lake with 30 mph winds. Its real difficult to make a solid surface backsplash conform to those discrepancies.

When you remove your laminate counter surface cut out the remaining sheetrock where the sheetrock was damaged, from the top of the base cabinet to the bottom of the upper cabinet. The larger piece of sheetrock will be more substantial and ridged than a 6" spliced piece. Green Board is a good material to replace the old with and to work with and is available at any Home Depot and Lowes.

Replace with some sort of smaller dimension tile 2", 4", or 6" any larger then you run into the same problem as with the one piece baksplash, conforming to your imperfect walls.

Pick your style of backsplash whether its squared up on a diagonal or staggered like subway. A natural stone tile ie. tumbled marble always looks nice, if your kitchen is not huge don't bother with any designs with inlays and mosaics. sometime simple backsplashes look the best.

Any pics?

Just my :twocents:

M-Funf
04-17-2008, 03:46 PM
I like quartz countertops as well. It looks like they might be pretty durable.

If you end up tiling, you should use hardibacker as others have mentioned. Green board (now it's yellow fiberglass filled stuff that's hard to work with) would probably work, too.

Here's a pic of a quartz counter top (from the Cambria website)

http://www.cambriausa.com/images/palette/7620/gallery/r-0010.jpg

TX.X-30 fan
04-17-2008, 08:16 PM
So is this stuff man made in molds?? That does not look like any of the quartz we have seen?

TX.X-30 fan
04-17-2008, 08:25 PM
So is this stuff man made in molds?? That does not look like any of the quartz we have seen?



No TX. it is man made from quartz and has some great advantages! No need to seal ever 1,000x stronger that granite and no problem with citric acids like granite. ;)

TX.X-30 fan
04-17-2008, 08:31 PM
No TX. it is man made from quartz and has some great advantages! No need to seal ever 1,000x stronger that granite and no problem with citric acids like granite. ;)




Damn that sounds cool I will look up the site. My only concern would be that some granite has such character or as the designers would say movement. It is in fact very brittle until installed. I personally like the heavy veining some granite slabs exhibit.

TX.X-30 fan
04-17-2008, 08:35 PM
Damn that sounds cool I will look up the site. My only concern would be that some granite has such character or as the designers would say movement. It is in fact very brittle until installed. I personally like the heavy veining some granite slabs exhibit.





I can see your point TX. I just like the fact that its virtually maintenance free and extremely sturdy. Hey I always enjoy reading your post because they contain so much valuable information dude. :D

shepherd
04-17-2008, 09:21 PM
I like quartz countertops as well. It looks like they might be pretty durable.

Here's a pic of a quartz counter top (from the Cambria website)


We went with the Bristol Blue: http://www.cambriausa.com/colordetail.cfm?color=3210&colorname=Bristol%20Blue

rodltg2
04-17-2008, 09:51 PM
we love working with the engineered stone , quartz as you guys are calling it. it easy to polish, doesnt break as easy and very consistent. with that said however i would rather use granite in my home. i just like the natural charcteristics of it . be carefull with hot plates though, it has glue in it and it will melt . granite will not. you can't use outside or as a fireplace surround either.


we sell quite a bit of it though, but more often than not cost more than granite!

yzwiley
04-18-2008, 12:15 PM
Who's found the hook-up on glass mosaic tiles?

We too are remodeling our kitchen and are looking to put glass mosaic tiles up for the backsplash. We dig the mosaic tiles, but they're spendy. We're looking for a good source. Right now BuildDirect.com seems to be our best option. Anyone found a better deal? We'd love to find good prices on Oceanside Glasstile's products.

Ric
04-18-2008, 12:26 PM
I can see your point TX. I just like the fact that its virtually maintenance free and extremely sturdy. Hey I always enjoy reading your post because they contain so much valuable information dude. :D You are getting weirder and weirder as you age

shepherd
04-18-2008, 01:18 PM
Who's found the hook-up on glass mosaic tiles?

We too are remodeling our kitchen and are looking to put glass mosaic tiles up for the backsplash. We dig the mosaic tiles, but they're spendy. We're looking for a good source. Right now BuildDirect.com seems to be our best option. Anyone found a better deal? We'd love to find good prices on Oceanside Glasstile's products.

My wife showed me the glass mosaic tiles at the Home Depot Expo store in Orlando. When I saw the price, I headed for the exit. :eek3:

We'll probably be buying glass mosaic tiles... :rolleyes: :noface:

Monte
04-18-2008, 01:50 PM
My wife showed me the glass mosaic tiles at the Home Depot Expo store in Orlando. When I saw the price, I headed for the exit. :eek3:

We'll probably be buying glass mosaic tiles... :rolleyes: :noface:


That deserves another tool that you do not own. Whether it will be useful on said project in an invalid point.. Project = New tools;)

TX.X-30 fan
04-18-2008, 02:18 PM
You are getting weirder and weirder as you age




I think its the water here? ;)

Ric
04-18-2008, 02:24 PM
global warming