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Brn85ss
03-30-2005, 11:39 AM
Does anyone here for spring startup pull their distributor and manually prime their oil pump and all engine oil passages.One of my friends does that with his Malibu every year and it's still going strong after22 years.Might go to the trouble to do mine this year!

east tx skier
03-30-2005, 01:22 PM
Is the benefit avoiding dry start? If so, don't I avoid this, to a slight extent by filling up my new filter half way when I change my oil at the end of the season?

How do you manually prime the oil pump?

Brn85ss
03-30-2005, 01:29 PM
It doesn't just prime the pump but circulates oil through the whole engine. So when you start it up the oil is already distrbuted in the engine not just in the oil pan.I know my friends who build hot rods always do this before first start up.I'm not sure it's nessesary for an old boat like mine but I was curiuos if anyone else was doing this for their spring start up.To do this you need to pull the distributor and use a drill with the right bit to reach the pump and circulate.

east tx skier
03-30-2005, 01:34 PM
I've never done that and it's too late this year because I've already been out.

Brn85ss
03-30-2005, 01:39 PM
Doug,I'm really not sure it's worth the hassle. Ithink I will just lube up the cylinders on start up and call it good.Just thought I would see if anyone else was doing this.

martini
03-30-2005, 01:46 PM
Priming the pump and circulating oil is generally reserved for new engine builds. There is a simple tool that can be purchased at most auto part stores. It is a simple steel shaft with an aluminum plate(looks like a big stepped washer) that fits into the hole where the distributor would go. The shaft engages the oil pump and the plate center's it in the hole. You connect the other end(end sticking out of block) to an electric drill. Set the drill to reverse and have at it. You will want to do it for about 5 or so minutes, so that the oil will reach the rocker arms. Once done, remove the shaft and plate, restab your distributor, start her up and set timing. I wouldn't consider it an absolute requirement that this be done, but it obviously can't hurt and would probably contribute to the longevity of the engine. I did it when I had to recently re-ring my engine, but don't when de-winterizing.

tph
03-30-2005, 02:00 PM
I seem to remember an electric pump system that would establish oil pressure before the engine was started. Haven't seen it advertised in some time though.

Storm861triple
03-30-2005, 03:35 PM
Waste of time.

Your friends Malibu would still be going strong even if he didn't do that. One of the additives in oil is there to help the oil "stick" to all the wear surfaces, so that there is a protective film of lube upon start up. After a week of sitting, the oil is about as drained back down into the pan as it's ever going to be, and that addative and the film is all that's helping you at that point. So, knowing that, you going to do this every weekend? It certainly CAN'T hurt, but in reality it's big-time "Marginal Utility"; lot's of effort for very little if any gain.

-Tom

east tx skier
03-30-2005, 03:52 PM
I was thinking to myself, well, my boat is twelve years old, has had zero problems that could be linked to engine oil (knock wood), and has, in all probability, never known this pleasure. Why start now?

Brn85ss
03-30-2005, 04:13 PM
I thought the same,my boat is 20 years old and my buddy that I bought it from never did this and it's still going strong!As for my Malibu buddy he is in the car industry and I think he just had one of his employee's do it for him.He is alittle anal.

1wideglide
03-31-2005, 01:03 AM
Check out www.masterlube.net.
This is where they sell a addon "masterlube" to prelube your engine before starting.

Laurel_Lake_Skier
04-05-2005, 10:13 PM
Although it will not be exactly the same effect as pulling the distributor and spinning the oil pump, if you want to have nearly the same result, pull the kill switch and turn the engine over for a bit. You will have moving engine parts but this will get oil circulating before the engine fires and exerts any real strain on the internal parts.

scramblerkid
04-12-2005, 06:33 PM
there are many oil additives that claim to keep the engine lubed for start up. "slick 50" etc, I use "Restore" in all my engines, it can't hurt...