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jsonova99
03-29-2005, 03:53 PM
I ordered my new EZ loader trailer, but I have decided to restore the original. I want to strip the whole thing down to bare metal to get all of the old paint and especially rust off of it. It would be easier and cheaper for me to use a grinder because I can do that at home, but I'm wondering if that will be too harsh. I kind of figured that sandblasting is probably better and less destructive. Any thoughts?

east tx skier
03-29-2005, 04:01 PM
I used a grinder on the rusty parts of my trailer before spot-priming and painting. I've had no ill effects a year later, but am admittedly no expert on the subject. I suppose it would depend, to a certain extent, how much rust you have and how much money you want to spend on it.

BriEOD
03-29-2005, 04:02 PM
I used a grinder on the rusty parts of my trailer before spot-priming and painting. I've had no ill effects a year later, but am admittedly no expert on the subject. I suppose it would depend, to a certain extent, how much rust you have and how much money you want to spend on it.

Same action here and same result.

jsonova99
03-29-2005, 04:04 PM
I don't want to spend anything on it. My plan is to do all of the work myself which is why I was planning on the grinder. When I'm all done I may have some reinforcement pieces welded in to a few high stress spots or where the rust was pretty bad. Basically under the bunks and the point in the trailer where it starts to bend towards the front.

jsonova99
03-29-2005, 04:10 PM
To build on my own thread here, what is the best way to handle the fiberglass sides of the trailer? Mine don't have any damage, but they are extremely faded I was just thinking of painting them, but I don't know how that will turn out

Ric
03-29-2005, 04:10 PM
Same action here and same result.
I've done both
The very best way is sandblasting but you will remove everything from the trailer and spend some extra money doing it this way

grinding off the rust is easy and cheap and can look just fine (If you're smooth about it)

I've written this before but everyone needs to watch their trailer closely as it ages! Signs of rust may be signals of much deeper problems.
I had a rusted trailer, tore it down, took it to sandblast. During blasting, he found that the trailer was hanging on by a thread :eek: . We had to do extensive welding of braces and gussets to get the thing roadworthy and THEN back to blast and prime and paint. (this whole time, my boat is floating in a nearby public lake :eek: )

When you're ready to repair it. Jab the rusty areas pretty good with a punch or a screwdriver and see how bad they are. If they are thru-holes, you should look into grinding ALL the rotted area away and beefing it up with new braces prior to repaint.

jsonova99
03-29-2005, 04:12 PM
I've done both
The very best way is sandblasting but you will remove everything from the trailer and spend some extra money doing it this way

grinding off the rust is easy and cheap and can look just fine (If you're smooth about it)

I've written this before but everyone needs to watch their trailer closely as it ages! Signs of rust may be signals of much deeper problems.
I had a rusted trailer, tore it down, took it to sandblast. During blasting, he found that the trailer was hanging on by a thread :eek: . We had to do extensive welding of braces and gussets to get the thing roadworthy and THEN back to blast and prime and paint. (this whole time, my boat is floating in a nearby public lake :eek: )


When you're ready to repair it. Jab the rusty areas pretty good with a punch or a screwdriver and see how bad they are. If they are thru-holes, you should look into grinding ALL the rotted area away and beefing it up with new braces prior to repaint.


This is my plan, since I have the new trailer coming, I'm under no time limit so I want to take the whole thing down to bare metal and then prime and paint. I've already targeted the bad spots that will need reinforcement.

east tx skier
03-29-2005, 04:21 PM
I had some new angle irons welded on to mirror the old ones. The worst rust was on the underside of the old angle irons, but after I ground it down, there was plenty with which to work. Now, instead of an L support, I have a T. I also had the old prop guard cut out and replaced with a solid piece of steel. Now, when my prop guard hits something, I worry about what I hit instead of the prop guard.

Spray paint from the hardware store (over primer) was a close enough match for me. You'd have to get pretty close to see where I touched things up.

Do the brakes work?

jsonova99
03-29-2005, 04:24 PM
I had some new angle irons welded on to mirror the old ones. The worst rust was on the underside of the old angle irons, but after I ground it down, there was plenty with which to work. Now, instead of an L support, I have a T. I also had the old prop guard cut out and replaced with a solid piece of steel. Now, when my prop guard hits something, I worry about what I hit instead of the prop guard.

Spray paint from the hardware store (over primer) was a close enough match for me. You'd have to get pretty close to see where I touched things up.

Do the brakes work?


no brakes on mine. The spraying that you are talking about is on the metal, right? Do you have any pictures of the brackets you welded in? I'd be curious to see.

east tx skier
03-29-2005, 04:30 PM
The spraying is on the metal. I don't have pictures of the brackets handy, but they are just angle irons that are the same deminsions as what's on there now. They abut the originals and are welded to them. Currently, I don't have holes in them or carriage bolts going through them (the new ones), but I could someday if need be.

jsonova99
03-29-2005, 04:32 PM
I think I understand. It'ss probably be a long long time before I get to that point anyway. Finishing the boat is number one priority, then I'll start fooling with the old trailer, assuming I don't pick up any other toys in the meantime :headbang:

east tx skier
03-29-2005, 04:45 PM
When you get your bunks off, you'll understand immediately. Just put a mirror up to the bunk support and that's what I did. Next time I'm under the boat, I'll try to remember to snap a good picture for you.

Until then, maybe this will help. (picture was taken between primer and white coats).

Star92
03-29-2005, 10:37 PM
east tx skier, I really like the way you put the rollers on your trailer. What kind of rollers are they, and where can I get some? Are they stainless and have roller bearings in them? I have been considering doing the same thing to my trailer, I helped a friend with an older tandem trailer, we put a piece of pipe across the back with a slightly larger piece over it that would allow it to roll into his garage. He was dealing with a bad angle coming in from his driveway. It works great, but yours looks much more professional. Thanks, Jay

jsonova99
03-30-2005, 06:03 AM
When you get your bunks off, you'll understand immediately. Just put a mirror up to the bunk support and that's what I did. Next time I'm under the boat, I'll try to remember to snap a good picture for you.

Until then, maybe this will help. (picture was taken between primer and white coats).

Your trailer looks a little different than mine for some reason, I might be crazy though, I'll have to get a good look at mine this weekend when I get the boat out of the garage

River Rat
03-30-2005, 07:09 AM
What about inside the tube of the frame? I need to restore mine but the rust inside the tube scares me. A neighbor of mine had his rear half of the trailer break off coming out of the garage one day. He knew the trailer was rusty, but had no idea it was that bad. It rusted from the inside out.

jsonova99
03-30-2005, 07:11 AM
What about inside the tube of the frame? I need to restore mine but the rust inside the tube scares me. A neighbor of mine had his rear half of the trailer break off coming out of the garage one day. He knew the trailer was rusty, but had no idea it was that bad. It rusted from the inside out.

That was my fear, that's why I bought a new trailer. I basically had no choice since I had no where to put my boat to work on the old trailer. I figure once I get the boat situated on the new trailer I will give the old one a good look and see if it's worth my time or not.

JEREMY79
03-30-2005, 09:13 AM
Why not figure out some way to check the inside? I would do this before I spent the $$ on a new trailer

Ric
03-30-2005, 10:15 AM
What about inside the tube of the frame? I need to restore mine but the rust inside the tube scares me. A neighbor of mine had his rear half of the trailer break off coming out of the garage one day. He knew the trailer was rusty, but had no idea it was that bad. It rusted from the inside out.
Exactly what I'm referring to.
there will always be rust inside the trailer tubes, but you want to be sure yours isnt rusted thru.
go at it pretty rough to find out if any of the rust is thru rust
look for it especially around areas where water may pond when sitting inside the tubing and of course at any weld joint or any cut holes in the tubing as these areas had heavy carbon introduced when the trailer was new. Thank God I caught mine prior to letting it come apart like your friend's or even worse....

east tx skier
03-30-2005, 10:28 AM
east tx skier, I really like the way you put the rollers on your trailer. What kind of rollers are they, and where can I get some? Are they stainless and have roller bearings in them? I have been considering doing the same thing to my trailer, I helped a friend with an older tandem trailer, we put a piece of pipe across the back with a slightly larger piece over it that would allow it to roll into his garage. He was dealing with a bad angle coming in from his driveway. It works great, but yours looks much more professional. Thanks, Jay

To address the rust in the tube thing (as it pertains to my situation) briefly, there are small drain holes drilled on the side of the angled portion of the prop guard (opposite of what's pictured). The underside is solid steel all the way across. Since I store it nose down, I had them put on that side.

As for the rollers, they're not stainless, but they're never in the water for too long and, a year later, have no rust on the wheels. I need to greese the axles though. I purchased them from Pak Industries (http://www.pakindustries.com/micro_marine.html). They do have stainless wheels now with zert fittings.

Warning, these things will tear up your driveway. Your driveway will thank you if you go with poly wheels. But I agree, on the road, these look really slick. And once I'm out of the driveway (thanks to a 2" trailer lift and a 5.25" tongue drop on the way down), I want my wheels to be doing the damage rather than receiving it. But since I put those on there, my prop guard has never touched bottom.

captkidd
03-30-2005, 04:19 PM
If I were going to refurb your old trailer, I would definitely add brakes to the trailer. It ain't free, but it could save you a lot of money (or even your life) in the long run. No matter what you tow with, an emergency stop on a wet road can cause all kinds of problems without trailer brakes.

east tx skier
03-30-2005, 04:39 PM
Agreed. When I got my brakes fixed on mine, it became noticeably easier to stop. That's always a good thing. :)

jsonova99
03-31-2005, 07:23 AM
Why not figure out some way to check the inside? I would do this before I spent the $$ on a new trailer

Good point, up under my bunk rails is almost rusted through, extremely thin. Something that will need to be addressed fairly soon. I'll probably need to weld in some sort of reinforcement. My fear is that the bunks will cave in at some point under the weight of the boat. Is it going to happen this weeknd? Probably not, but I don't think the trailer as is has more than a year or two left in it safely without some serious overhauling. Again, my problem is that if I can't do the work with the boat on the trailer, then I can't do the work. IMHO, I think what I paid for the new trailer was a worth it for piece of mind. Especially since I may be pulling the boat up to Maine this summer.

JEREMY79
03-31-2005, 10:02 AM
I've got the same problem. I have to do some work on my trailer this summer. And dont know what to do with the boat.

jsonova99
03-31-2005, 10:09 AM
The thing that pushed me over the edge, was that I began finding pieces of rust on my garage floor. I decided right there that it was too risky to try to squeeze more years out of it. The rest of the trailer isn't too bad, I mean it's rusty all over, but that's the only spot where I feel it is structurally compromised. I'm planning on restoring it a little at a time.

east tx skier
03-31-2005, 10:11 AM
Good point, up under my bunk rails is almost rusted through, extremely thin. Something that will need to be addressed fairly soon. I'll probably need to weld in some sort of reinforcement. My fear is that the bunks will cave in at some point under the weight of the boat. Is it going to happen this weeknd? Probably not, but I don't think the trailer as is has more than a year or two left in it safely without some serious overhauling. Again, my problem is that if I can't do the work with the boat on the trailer, then I can't do the work. IMHO, I think what I paid for the new trailer was a worth it for piece of mind. Especially since I may be pulling the boat up to Maine this summer.

At least in my experience, those bunk supports may look worse than they actually are. Of course, everyone's trailer's life has been different, so use your judgment. Mine looked horrible, but after I got them ground down, they ended up being quite salvageable. I only had the reinforcement supports added for ease of upgrading in the future.

jsonova99
03-31-2005, 10:18 AM
I jsut started getting very nervous with all of the rust pieces on the floor. At the back end of the trailer where the bunk ends, the rail has rusted through already. Like I said it was either buy a trailer now or in a year or two, one way or another I was going to have to address it. I figured doing it now was better when everything else with the boat is fine. I'm sure it can be fixed, but I'd have to be able to get it done in a few hours while I had the boat in the water which isn't going to happen. I've though about restoring an old Stars and Stripes anyway to leave at my cottage in Maine, so having the extra trailer could come in handy down the road.

east tx skier
03-31-2005, 10:28 AM
I'm guessing that the horizontal piece is all that's rusted through. As I mentioned earlier, you can get some angle irons (either "L" or "T" piece depending on how much you have to work with) and get it welded to the vertical portion of the old support. Should do nicely and shouldn't be too expensive if you remove the bunks before hand (or you could DIY if you're good with a torch).

jsonova99
03-31-2005, 10:31 AM
That's what I'm planning on doing. First I want to strip the trailer down and get it primed, then I'll tackle the reinforcing. Girlfriend went through plumber's apprentice training for a while, she's the family welder! Now she's a desk jockey like me, but hopefully she's still got the touch. :banana:

campbelljo
03-31-2005, 11:41 PM
Jeremy79,

Try cranking the nose of the trailer down while unhooked from your vehicle, block up the rear of the boat with something stable,possibly blocks topped with wood. Then crank the tongue back up and secure the nose of the boat to an engine hoist, cherry picker, chain, etc. Then you should be able to lower the tongue and pull the trailer out from under the boat. Have been reading for a while now, first post. I am about to try the same with my boat.

erkoehler
04-01-2005, 01:26 AM
sounds alittle to risky for me! :confused:

jsonova99
04-01-2005, 01:45 AM
That would make me nervous, but if ou know what you're doing go for it. I'd love to hear how it works out.

east tx skier
04-01-2005, 12:09 PM
Wouldn't you want to grind everything down, add the reenforcements, then prime/paint. I'm no welder, but it seems you'd want a clean surface to do the welding. But maybe not. I'm no welder.

east tx skier
04-01-2005, 12:10 PM
Seems someone mentioned setting their boat on several stacks of old carpet or tires. It'd scare me to death, but I remember someone claiming to have done it.

By the way, welcome, Campbelljo.

ski_king
04-01-2005, 12:26 PM
One of my first posts (http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=147) on this board was about this topic. I was wanting to blast and repaint my triler in the off season.
I didnt find a method of holding the boat that didn't scare me, so that project still needs done.
I did talk to a couple of inboard dealers that are on a lake and the both offered to store it for me for a week or 2, but all there berths were used for winter storage. As soon as the boats go in the water, they will have room.
Hopefully that should be in about a month.

east tx skier
04-01-2005, 01:45 PM
I just anchored mine off shore and worked quickly. I went skiing while the paint dried.

AirJunky
04-01-2005, 01:50 PM
A few more weeks & you can borrow my trailer. Our docks are going in the water on April 28th & the boat will go in shortly after. The boat & trailer aren't likely to see each other more than 2 or 3 times from May to October. :cool: