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coz
03-05-2008, 03:44 PM
They are trying to make it brown again.
http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2008/US/03/05/grand.canyon.flood.ap/art.dam.water.pool.jpg
http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2008/US/03/05/grand.canyon.flood.ap/art.glen.canyon.dam.gi.jpg

PAGE, Arizona (AP) -- Federal officials have started a flood in the Grand Canyon in hopes of restoring its ecosystem.


The dam, near the Arizona-Utah state line, holds back the Colorado River to form Lake Powell.
2 of 2 The torrent will flow for three days from the Glen Canyon Dam on the Arizona-Utah state line.

It began Wednesday morning.

The canyon's ecosystem was permanently changed after the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam in 1963.

The Colorado Riverdownstream used to be warm and muddy, but now it's cold and clear.

The shift helped speed the extinction of four fish species and push two others, including the endangered humpback chub, near the edge.

Officials hope the flooding will stir up sediment and redistribute it through the canyon.

"story link"
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/03/05/grand.canyon.flood.ap/index.html
:D

lanier92prostar
03-05-2008, 04:12 PM
So I take it that they are draining Lake Powell in the process??

shepherd
03-05-2008, 04:38 PM
The "endangered humpback chub"??? They just make that **** up don't they? :cool:

coz
03-05-2008, 05:01 PM
So I take it that they are draining Lake Powell in the process??

All that water is coming from up river and Powell is up river :(

The "endangered humpback chub"??? They just make that **** up don't they?

Here's a humpback chub.
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/36/83074950_00cdc3a8da_o.jpg
Looks to small for my pan.:D

Sodar
03-05-2008, 05:02 PM
Hopefully that means the Parker and Blythe will be flowing this weekend! :D

Come on, I can dream!

I wonder if Mead will go up?

88 PS190
03-05-2008, 05:19 PM
and to think the whole west coast is facing drought and water crisis, and the humpback chub is being protected....

its not even targeted by flyfishermen, and we all know they're the ones who protect most fish!

coz
03-05-2008, 05:22 PM
Hopefully that means the Parker and Blythe will be flowing this weekend! :D

Come on, I can dream!

I wonder if Mead will go up?

I hope it brings us up or keeps us at a consistent level, I havn't seen these gates open in a loooooong time. Then again it has to go through 2 more lakes after mead before P&B :(
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/26/55645136_9ad9c27380_o.jpg
:D

TMCNo1
03-05-2008, 05:27 PM
The enviormentalists held up the construction of a sewer system for 3 years in our little town that was to follow a creek bottom, because of a snail someone said was endangered. Go figure, after the sewer pipes were installed, they started to multiply again and are thriving.

dog paw
03-05-2008, 05:29 PM
The "endangered humpback chub"??? They just make that **** up don't they? :cool:


I have heard the Doc can fix a humpback chub8p

That clip was on the noon news, MAN that is alot of water moving fast!

Ric
03-05-2008, 05:35 PM
well it's been a real shame without the humpback chub around all these years

wakeX2wake
03-05-2008, 05:36 PM
i'd like to see a few endangered fishing boats to preserve the fisheries reserves in the lakes rivers and streams

coz
03-05-2008, 05:41 PM
well it's been a real shame without the humpback chub around all these years

:woohoo: You could get on board and join the humpback chub club :woohoo:
:D

stuartmcnair
03-05-2008, 06:30 PM
so can the kids join the "little chubbie club"?

TMCNo1
03-05-2008, 07:52 PM
Here is a video, http://video.rr.com/rrvc.html?mid=48378, it would fill up the Empire State building in 20 minutes.
32097

coz
03-14-2008, 12:33 AM
They are trying to make it brown again.
http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2008/US/03/05/grand.canyon.flood.ap/art.dam.water.pool.jpg
http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2008/US/03/05/grand.canyon.flood.ap/art.glen.canyon.dam.gi.jpg

PAGE, Arizona (AP) -- Federal officials have started a flood in the Grand Canyon in hopes of restoring its ecosystem.


The dam, near the Arizona-Utah state line, holds back the Colorado River to form Lake Powell.
2 of 2 The torrent will flow for three days from the Glen Canyon Dam on the Arizona-Utah state line.

It began Wednesday morning.

The canyon's ecosystem was permanently changed after the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam in 1963.

The Colorado Riverdownstream used to be warm and muddy, but now it's cold and clear.

The shift helped speed the extinction of four fish species and push two others, including the endangered humpback chub, near the edge.

Officials hope the flooding will stir up sediment and redistribute it through the canyon.

"story link"
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/03/05/grand.canyon.flood.ap/index.html
:D

Manmade Canyon flood showed quick results
Associated Press
Mar. 13, 2008 04:52 PM

The results of a manmade flood in the Grand Canyon last week were immediate and substantial, adding as much as football field-sized areas of vital sediment to parts along the Colorado River, officials said.

The three-day flood that ended last Friday was designed to redistribute and add sediment to the 277-mile river in the Grand Canyon, where the ecosystem was forever changed by the construction of a dam more than four decades ago.

The sediment provides a habitat for plants and animals, builds beaches for campers and river runners and helps protect archaeological sites from erosion and weathering.





But since 1963, the Glen Canyon Dam just south of the Arizona-Utah border has blocked the sediment from the Colorado downstream, turning the once muddy and warm river into a cool, clear environment that helped speed the extinction of four fish species and push two others near the edge.

Grand Canyon National Park Superintendent Steve Martin, who returned from a five-day trip down the river Tuesday to see the initial impacts of last week's flood, said the results are phenomenal.

"On a couple of big sandbars there were already beaver tracks, bighorn sheep tracks," Martin said. "You could see the animals already exploring new aspects of the old canyon."

He said the new sandbars range in size from small nooks and crannies to ones as large as football fields.

"It changes the feeling of the canyon as you see the sediment along the shoreline from a feeling of increased sterility to one of a greater amount of vibrance," Martin said. "The benefits are substantial."

During the flood, flows in the Grand Canyon increased to 41,000 cubic feet per second for nearly three days - four to five times the normal amount of water released from the Glen Canyon Dam. Water levels along the river rose between 2 and 15 feet and left sediment behind when the four giant steel tubes releasing the water from the dam were closed.

Officials released similar manmade floods into the canyon in 1996 and in 2004.

But those floods actually resulted in a net reduction in overall sandbar size because they were conducted when the Colorado River was relatively sand-depleted, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Officials believe this year's flood will be beneficial because sand levels in the river are at a 10-year high and are three times greater than 2004 levels.

Whatever benefits come from this year's flood, however, will be eroded away within 18 months without additional similar floods every year to 18 months depending on the amount of sediment available, according to Martin.

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation calls for no other high-flow releases other than last week's flood until after 2012 in its environmental assessment on Glen Canyon Dam releases.

The Grand Canyon Trust, a Flagstaff-based group that has been critical of the bureau's management of the dam, also is calling for more regular high flows and plans to legally challenge the bureau's environmental assessment in federal court.

"It's kind of like when President Bush landed a jet on the aircraft carrier and held up a banner that said mission accomplished,' " Lash said. "Reclamation has come in with a lot of show and fanfare from last week's event and we're seeing the benefits of doing these high flows. But we know that they're short-lived and the Grand Canyon deserves long-lived benefits, long-lived restoration."

Scientists will collect data on the flood's effects through the fall. Initial reports will be available late this year or early next year. A complete synthesis of the results, which will include comparisons to the 1996 and 2004 floods, will be finished in 2010.
Looks like the humpback chub fishing should be good next year
:D

fintek9
03-14-2008, 12:39 AM
so can the kids join the "little chubbie club"?Or join Staristars "Big chubbies running club"!


:wavey:Steve

h2oskifreak
03-14-2008, 01:39 AM
The "endangered humpback chub"??? They just make that **** up don't they? :cool:
That's not funny to me. In the 80's I was the only skier on a private gravel pit next to the interstate, until the State found what the thought was an extinct form of the "sucker". My skiing was "done johnson". They used them (seven of them as) breeding stock and now cause other people problems elsewhere. Government at work "for the people".