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rodecker1978
03-05-2008, 12:47 AM
Hey fellas,
Anybody by chance know what the trailer tongue weight would be for a 2008 X-2? With boat on trailer of course...boat weighing in around 4000 wet and trailer weighing in at 1,100 lbs.

Thanks.

TMCNo1
03-05-2008, 11:20 AM
Probably a little more than 225 lbs. Our '89 PS 190 is 225 lbs.

I just set up the scales., board and pipes at the 2'/1' set up as posted below and it measured 75 lbs., then X 3 = 225lbs.

TMCNo1
03-05-2008, 11:23 AM
Here is a way of measuring tongue weight, http://www.metrotrailers.com/safetytips.html

Please post what you find out it is, for anyone who may need to know too!

Roonie's
03-05-2008, 11:26 AM
level angle I would say not much as I can lift it myself without help. It is balanced nicely at this point. Very minimal weight on the trailer tongue. If I was to guess I would say 75-250 pounds at the most depending on bumps you may go over.

TMCNo1
03-05-2008, 12:10 PM
If it's a tandem axle trailer instead of a single axle it may be somewhat less, but you didn't mention what type of trailer.

rodecker1978
03-05-2008, 12:52 PM
If it's a tandem axle trailer instead of a single axle it may be somewhat less, but you didn't mention what type of trailer.
The trailer is a tandem axle.

jwroblew
03-05-2008, 03:44 PM
General rule of thumb is 10% of the total trailer weight should be on the tounge when attached to the vehicle, so in your case 4000 lb for the boat plus 1100 lbs for the trailer = 5100 lbs X 0.10 = 510 lbs on the tounge. This should give best towing results. To see if this is correct hook up your trailer and drive it across the scales, your axle of your trailer should be equal to 5100 lb minus 510 lbs = 4590 lb. This is for any trailer axle configuration, single, double, triple, the math is always the same.

TMCNo1
03-05-2008, 04:13 PM
General rule of thumb is 10% of the total trailer weight should be on the tounge when attached to the vehicle, so in your case 4000 lb for the boat plus 1100 lbs for the trailer = 5100 lbs X 0.10 = 510 lbs on the tounge. This should give best towing results. To see if this is correct hook up your trailer and drive it across the scales, your axle of your trailer should be equal to 5100 lb minus 510 lbs = 4590 lb. This is for any trailer axle configuration, single, double, triple, the math is always the same.

In our case, as Mastercraft owners, MC has already done the calculations for each boat and trailer combo and set them up accordingly for manufacture. The Boat Buddy/winch stand is welded permanent and so are the axles, therefore they cannot be adjusted w/o major cutting, welding, fiberglass fender work and refinishing.
I would guess that just measuring the tongue weight for what you have and having that information is then just peace of mind in knowing what it is and nothing more, unless it exceeds the hitch of the tow vehicle recommendations. Then another class hitch or another tow vehicle may be in order.

As edited above, mine comes up 225 lbs. I have previously had the trailer and boat weighed, full of gear and full of gas @ 3260 lbs., that's 2200 lb boat, 790 lb. trailer + 270 lbs. gas and gear. 3260 X 10% =326lbs. tongue weight per the above general rule.
All I can say is after towing over 30,000 miles, that's the sweetest towing boat I could have ever asked for. MasterCraft knew what they were doing when they designed and set that model up.

rodecker1978
03-05-2008, 06:43 PM
I understand that the general rule of thumb is 10% on the tongue for best towing performance. However, this is not the case for most boats due to boat trailer design and the position of the boat on the trailer - most of the boat weight behind and on top of the trailer axles. I and several others have said that they can individually pick up the tongue themselves....thus the tongue weight is nowhere near 510 lbs.

TMCNo1 - You're right, I just want to know this number for peace of mind and to know if I need to make any modifications to the rear end of my Grand Cherokee.

Based on some research I have done...I believe boat trailers tend to hold 5-8% of the total boat/trailer weight on their tongues. I will throw this thing on the scales when I get it and let you guys know.

Thanks much for all the input.

TMCNo1
03-05-2008, 08:09 PM
I understand that the general rule of thumb is 10% on the tongue for best towing performance. However, this is not the case for most boats due to boat trailer design and the position of the boat on the trailer - most of the boat weight behind and on top of the trailer axles. I and several others have said that they can individually pick up the tongue themselves....thus the tongue weight is nowhere near 510 lbs.

TMCNo1 - You're right, I just want to know this number for peace of mind and to know if I need to make any modifications to the rear end of my Grand Cherokee.

Based on some research I have done...I believe boat trailers tend to hold 5-8% of the total boat/trailer weight on their tongues. I will throw this thing on the scales when I get it and let you guys know.

Thanks much for all the input.


Anytime! Mine works out at 6.9% and that's close enough for gubment work!

jwroblew
03-05-2008, 09:13 PM
Less than 5% - brake in turn issues. Greater than 15% the trailer tends to push vehicle around straight down the road.

MariStar-Man
10-12-2009, 11:15 AM
You are all pretty close...

Typically, tongue weight should represent about 7 percent to 8 percent of your GTWR. If tongue weight exceeds 10 to 15 percent of GTWR, you must use a weight-distributing hitch and sway-control system.

Class I — Up to 2,000 pounds towing capacity, 200 to 250 pounds
tongue weight
Class II — Up to 3,500 pounds towing capacity, 250 to 350 pounds
tongue weight
Class III — Up to 5,000 pounds towing capacity, 350 to 600 pounds
tongue weight
Class IV — Up to 10,000 pounds towing capacity, 600 to 1,000 pounds
tongue weight
Class V — Up to 25,000 pounds towing capacity, fifth wheel/gooseneck