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loeweb
03-03-2008, 02:48 PM
I need some help. I am not for sure if I F'd up my boat this winter. Long story short, I winterized using the following steps Drained block, pulled impeller, drained exhaust manifold, drained tranny cooler. Didn't antifreeze b/c I thought there was a chance that I'd be back out before it got stupid cold. I was wrong. Went to check on the boat this weekend and noticed that a freeze plug was popped out on one side but not the other and this is very worrysome. Soooo... Is there any way to check if the block is cracked before starting it up? Again I need some peace of mind and

loeweb
03-03-2008, 02:48 PM
I need some help. I am not for sure if I F'd up my boat this winter. Long story short, I winterized using the following steps Drained block, pulled impeller, drained exhaust manifold, drained tranny cooler. Didn't antifreeze b/c I thought there was a chance that I'd be back out before it got stupid cold. I was wrong. Went to check on the boat this weekend and noticed that a freeze plug was popped out on one side but not the other and this is very worrysome. Soooo... Is there any way to check if the block is cracked before starting it up? Again I need some peace of mind and reassurance that I didn't done anything harmful to my third child!

03 35th Anniversary
03-03-2008, 02:55 PM
If your lucky it only pushed the freeze plug out.

But check the oil for water first. Then give the block and such a good look over.

bigmac
03-03-2008, 03:11 PM
That's surprising about the freeze plug. Sounds to me like you followed MasterCraft's recommended winterization procedures exactly.

Prostar Rich
03-03-2008, 03:17 PM
Did you open both drains on the block and not just one?

Prostar Rich

east tx skier
03-03-2008, 03:22 PM
I'll give you a bump and say, at least you drained everything.

justinglow
03-03-2008, 03:26 PM
The same thing happen to me a few years ago. I winterized just like you but added antifreeze to it also. Pulled it out in the spring and noticed the freeze plug pushed out. Didn't pop all the way out and didn't hurt the engine. From that point on I just drain the block and don't add antifreeze anymore. Never had a problem since. Hopefully yours will be ok.

loeweb
03-03-2008, 05:17 PM
Got to thinking, I may have shut the petcock on the side that the freeze plug came out of. I know I drained both sides, but may have closed that side back up. Would that have anything to do with it?

wakeX2wake
03-03-2008, 05:23 PM
Not too sure on that last part but I had a similar thing happen w/ my '93 Maristar. Drained both sides pulled plugs the whole nine yards and it blew a freeze plug w/ no antifreeze. After replacing a motor yr before last and the drain plug popping last yr the '93 Maristar and the '07 X2 go to the dealership to get winterized and stored so if anything happens it's on them. Just a word of advice.

flipper
03-03-2008, 05:47 PM
I would think you're okay. Sounds like the freeze plugs did thier job and pushed out instead of cracking the block. Check for water in the oil, look around the block for cracks or water on it where it shouldn't be, put water to it, start it up, and look for leaks.

bigmac
03-03-2008, 05:53 PM
Uh oh...did you say "petcock"?

Those things would make me very nervous. Rust and scale inside the block can block the drain plug hole itself, let alone a petcock. MC specifically states the importance of poking a wire or something in the drain plug hole to make sure it's not plugged, and that the whole block is drained....

jimmer2880
03-03-2008, 07:52 PM
I would think you're okay. Sounds like the freeze plugs did thier job and pushed out instead of cracking the block. Check for water in the oil, look around the block for cracks or water on it where it shouldn't be, put water to it, start it up, and look for leaks.

Freeze plugs weren't actually designed to protect the block from freezing. They are designed to plug the holes that are required to remove the sand when the block is cast. They just happen to pop sometimes when the block freezes, and will, sometimes prevent further damage.

Many people pop freeze plugs, and still need a head gasket, or worse.

As some have eluded to here, never just open the petcock, completely remove it. They have a habbit of getting cloged with rust flakes.

erkoehler
03-03-2008, 07:59 PM
I would suggest taking it to the MC dealer and have them go through the engine before spring. Get it in ASAP, no point in waiting for summer if you have a problem.

flipper
03-03-2008, 09:03 PM
Freeze plugs weren't actually designed to protect the block from freezing. They are designed to plug the holes that are required to remove the sand when the block is cast. They just happen to pop sometimes when the block freezes, and will, sometimes prevent further damage.


I didn't know there are freeze plugs and "core plugs"....I know they use the holes to clean out the block when it is cast, but thought "freeze plugs" were used to plug the holes. Found this....

A true freeze plug is an expansion plug located in the side of an engine block that is supposed to protect the block against freeze damage. Water expands when it turns to ice, and if the coolant does not have enough antifreeze protection it can freeze and crack the engine block. The freeze plugs (there are usually several) are supposed to pop out under such conditions to relieve the pressure on the block.

Most of the plugs to be found on an engine are actually to plug the holes where sand cores have been held. The sand cores are used in the casting process to form internal cavities in the engine block or cylinder head, for cooling water for example, and so should really be referred to as core plugs.

BrandonKTM
03-04-2008, 12:21 PM
One part not mentioned. After all plugs are out of engine,etc. either take boat/trailer for ride down the road, or lift up tongue of trailer, and drop tongue to ground to make sure all water drains out of various cavities & hoses.

loeweb
03-04-2008, 01:34 PM
One part not mentioned. After all plugs are out of engine,etc. either take boat/trailer for ride down the road, or lift up tongue of trailer, and drop tongue to ground to make sure all water drains out of various cavities & hoses.

I did have to hook the boat up and haul it about two to three blocks away to get it put up. Had to drive up a hill and back down before placing her in bed for the winter. Don't know if this is good news or not, but the freeze plug in question was in crooked this fall, and it actually didn't pop out, but it was still barely in the hole the other day. Thanks for the reassurance from everyone out there. This might turn out to be a good poll question. In fact.

jimmer2880
03-04-2008, 07:41 PM
I didn't know there are freeze plugs and "core plugs"....I know they use the holes to clean out the block when it is cast, but thought "freeze plugs" were used to plug the holes. Found this....

A true freeze plug is an expansion plug located in the side of an engine block that is supposed to protect the block against freeze damage. Water expands when it turns to ice, and if the coolant does not have enough antifreeze protection it can freeze and crack the engine block. The freeze plugs (there are usually several) are supposed to pop out under such conditions to relieve the pressure on the block.

Most of the plugs to be found on an engine are actually to plug the holes where sand cores have been held. The sand cores are used in the casting process to form internal cavities in the engine block or cylinder head, for cooling water for example, and so should really be referred to as core plugs.

I stand corrected. Now, I need to go to my other post and eat crow over there as well.:uglyhamme

However, they do not absolutely protect the engine against damage from freezing. I still say have someone take a closer look (not necessarily the dealer, but a trusted mechanic)