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Prostar Rich
02-20-2008, 12:06 PM
I need to perform a complete tune up on a 1990 Prostar 190 with a ford 351. I am very familiar with EFI engines however have not performed a tune up where points where involved. I did a search and didn't turn up a tune up procedure to folllow. I have the specs and know what parts I need but does anyone have or can steer me to a step by step procedure to follow? The boat has approx. 450 hours and has been tuned up as per the maintence schedule but this was done by a friend who was a mechanic but has recently passed away. I have never had an issue with the points so I was wondering if this would be a good time to switch over to a EI set up? Boat runs strong with no issues however it does have the original spark plug wires. Should I replace them or leave them alone?

Thanks,
Prostar Rich

BrianM
02-20-2008, 12:32 PM
I would do a cap and rotor, fresh set of plugs and a nice new set of plug wires. Throw the points away and change to electronic ignition. Besides that check the timing after you do the EI swap and hit the water.

In the future change the cap rotor and plugs each season and just inspect the rest. You should get many trouble free years of service.

Of course you also have your other basic items like changing the impeller, oil, filter and trans fluid.

I need to perform a complete tune up on a 1990 Prostar 190 with a ford 351. I am very familiar with EFI engines however have not performed a tune up where points where involved. I did a search and didn't turn up a tune up procedure to folllow. I have the specs and know what parts I need but does anyone have or can steer me to a step by step procedure to follow? The boat has approx. 450 hours and has been tuned up as per the maintence schedule but this was done by a friend who was a mechanic but has recently passed away. I have never had an issue with the points so I was wondering if this would be a good time to switch over to a EI set up? Boat runs strong with no issues however it does have the original spark plug wires. Should I replace them or leave them alone?

Thanks,
Prostar Rich

east tx skier
02-20-2008, 12:35 PM
In addition to what Brian said, change the fuel filter and clean the flame arrestor while you're at it.

6ballsisall
02-20-2008, 12:49 PM
^^^^^^^ All of the above covers most of it. Don't forget:

1. Apply 2 good coats of wax
2. Treat teak platform (if applicable)
3. Grease wheel bearings
4. Check tire pressure, integrity of the tires, tighten lug nuts to spec
5. Get cooler out and clean it up. Stock fridge w/ beer for start of the ski season!!!!!!!!!

JLeuck64
02-20-2008, 01:39 PM
Ahhh, good old point ignition systems. A throw back to time when things were simpler and less complicated... Old school!!!

I have been wrenching for a few decades and bet I could count on both hands the number of times I have changed out a set of points. That would be counting cars and boats by the way. I like to use a good quality Tach/Dwell meter hooked up to the ignition system. With the old plugs removed and the new points installed I will have a friend crank the engine over with the key. While the engine is cranking I will adjust the points until the dwell is toward the higher end of the specification. Then I reassemble everything and fire it up and double check the dwell reading with the engine idling. Once the dwell is OK I will adjust timing, idle RPM and idle mix as necessary. Of course it usually takes me several times to get the points set just right but hey, it's fun for me because I understand what needs to be done, how to do it and I have the right tools. Kind of relaxing in a way... If you like to tinker with stuff.

You may find it more frustrating to learn how to set points than to just switch over to EI so I would echo Brian's post.

88 PS190
02-20-2008, 03:03 PM
I don't mind points, even the old homemade dwell meter works, but the newer ones are much more accurate of course, the specs always have a few degrees of variation allowed.

Only time I have ever cursed points are on 6V systems converted to 12V. Normally such vehicles burn points rather readily, and the distributors are much more taxing to access than sitting in the observer seat and working in the sun.

One last thing I always like to do is check the leads to and from the ignition components for corrosion. Particularly those to the coil. I normally remove them, brush them lightly with some fine sand paper and replace them. And amazingly many people have running issues solely because of this sort of thing.

Prostar Rich
02-21-2008, 01:06 PM
Thanks for the replies. All of the other basic maintence that has been mentioned has been done religiously. I am going to tackle this job shortly. I am going to stick with the points. I guess my thinking is why fix it if it isn't broke.

Thanks,
Prostar Rich

rob935
03-01-2008, 09:05 AM
points will let you down when you least expect it and thats a guarantee !! switch over to electronic ignition and you will never look back..or ever have to change out as you should have to replace your points every year. i know alot of guys with prostars and stars & stripes every one of them now have e.i and i havent towed any of em back to the dock since !!

TMCNo1
03-01-2008, 10:04 AM
I always worried about the condition/gap/dwell/timing with my points, but never touched them till 4 years ago. The boat still had the original set in it and ran perfect, but???????? I put all that to rest with the Electronic Ignition Conversion kit from http://www.skidim.com/products.asp?dept=1113 and now all that points/condencer/gap/dwell timing, is just a after thought now. A new coil, cap and rotor is also part of a good installation.

JimN
03-01-2008, 10:30 AM
WOW! You have a 1990 boat with the OEM plug wires and only 450 hours? "Per maintenance schedule" would mean the plug wires and several other parts would have been replaced long ago. I'm surprised it runs at all, never mind strongly with OEM plug wires. I have seen 2 year old boats that had cross-fire issues from that era and it only gets worse over time.

The tune-up specs should be on one of the valve covers (on a sticker), but you might want to look under the distributor cap to make sure you don't already have electronic ignition. If you have had consistently good performance with points, there's really no reason to change to EI but EI does tend to be better in the consistency department. Lube the advance weights and make sure the springs are in good shape, too. If you're replacing points, it's a good time to check them out (under the plate on the distributor).

Sorry to hear about your friend.

jimmer2880
03-01-2008, 05:18 PM
You'll have more time invested in installing and adjusting the new points than it'll take to switch to electonic ignitition.

Everyone I know who made the switch picked up power and top-end when the switched (including me, on my old boat).

flipper
03-01-2008, 05:57 PM
I would switch it over for sure. To me it just seems like one less thing to go wrong.

Linkster
03-08-2008, 04:29 PM
BriEOD did a great job creating a step-by-step instruction:
http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=3533&highlight=electronic+ignition

jas3314
03-22-2008, 03:49 PM
I have a 94 Prostar 205 I picked up at the end of last season. What type of oil are y'all using, and is it recommended to go synthetic?

jimmer2880
03-22-2008, 08:14 PM
I have a 94 Prostar 205 I picked up at the end of last season. What type of oil are y'all using, and is it recommended to go synthetic?

There are as many opinions on that as there are members.

I'll tell you that after running Dino, Penzoil 10w40 for 600 hours, changing every 100, I had to do a bottom-end rebuild (long story, but engines like to have SOME oil to run). Anyway, when we pulled it apart, everything (except for the crank bearings, etc) was in showroom condition.

I'm not going to tell you NOT run run synthetic. However, since I don't have a problem changing my oil every 100 hours, I'm sticking with dino oil for the boat. (I run synthetic in my, and my wife's daily drivers and increase oil change intervals)

stuartmcnair
03-22-2008, 11:57 PM
IIRC the manual says do not run synthetic. I am using the Valvoline VR-1 40 Wt. Racing oil on the recommendation of another member. It's been working for him for 18 years so I think I'll take that advice. I change it a lot more often that 100 hours though. 20 is more like it for me.

TMCNo1
03-23-2008, 12:25 AM
Owners manuals usually call for 50 hour oil and filter change intervels.

JimN
03-23-2008, 12:39 AM
20 hours is a waste of time and money. It doesn't need to take a long time, after you come up with a system but that's just not long enough to get dirty enough to need changing. That would be like changing it every week on a car. If the car idles most of the time, that's one thing but at normal operating temperatures, a boat won't need it changed after 20 hours.

stuartmcnair
03-23-2008, 11:46 AM
20 hours is a waste of time and money. It doesn't need to take a long time, after you come up with a system but that's just not long enough to get dirty enough to need changing. That would be like changing it every week on a car. If the car idles most of the time, that's one thing but at normal operating temperatures, a boat won't need it changed after 20 hours.

I know. But I like to tinker with it and that is one of the few things I know how to do. :)

Seriously though. Once I get it to 700 hours I will probably switch over to a more regular maint schedule but since I don't have a history on it I am being overly cautious. I am trying to get everything internal nice and clean and then I will settle down.

jimmer2880
03-23-2008, 08:27 PM
Owners manuals usually call for 50 hour oil and filter change intervels.

I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure my manual says filter every 50, oil every 100.

jimmer2880
03-23-2008, 08:38 PM
I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure my manual says filter every 50, oil every 100.

I'm batting a thousand lately... Just double-checked. I was wrong... again :(

Oil every 50, Filter every 100 (never did understand why anyone would change one and not the other).

Ohh well. It's been every 100 for me and she looks as good as new on the inside (or, she did when she was torn down at 600 hours anyway).

jas3314
03-24-2008, 02:21 PM
Thanks for all the input! I'll have to see if he gave me the orig. owners manual. I think he did as he was quite meticulous w/this boat. I also wanna check on a service manual from Mastercraft for this year ('94).

TMCNo1
03-24-2008, 03:00 PM
I'm batting a thousand lately... Just double-checked. I was wrong... again :(

Oil every 50, Filter every 100 (never did understand why anyone would change one and not the other).

Ohh well. It's been every 100 for me and she looks as good as new on the inside (or, she did when she was torn down at 600 hours anyway).

Don't worry about it, I change my filter every 50 hours with the oil, cause I buy those $.75 filters from the flea market with the Sharpie smiley faces drawn on them!:rolleyes:

stuartmcnair
03-24-2008, 03:39 PM
Don't worry about it, I change my filter every 50 hours with the oil, cause I buy those $.75 filters from the flea market with the Sharpie smiley faces drawn on them!:rolleyes:

that's why he puts a cap over it on the engine...doesn't want anyone to see his shame

TMCNo1
03-24-2008, 09:02 PM
that's why he puts a cap over it on the engine...doesn't want anyone to see his shame

Naw, I got that one for $1.25 at the salvage house and I think it was a kitchen canister and I just stuck a roll of toilet paper in it cause it was so purdy!:rolleyes:

babymoore3
11-27-2008, 07:17 AM
All,
Oil should be changed every 50 hours or once a season because of the harsh acceleration nature of boats - therefore degradation of the oil. Harsh acceleration (hole shots, skiing, wakeboarding) causes the combustion gases to blow by all three rings and contaminate oil faster (at a very small scale). If you check your vehicle manuals most have two types of operations (highway and city/towing). Again the city / towing recommends oil changes sooner. Ok, so next question. Why do you change your oil at all? Soot from combustion (fine "dirt"), fuel dilution (more noticeable on carb engines) and acid created from the soot and moisture of combustion (oxidation of oil) leads to a reduction of the oil layer in the bearings. Reduction of oil layer leads to frictional contact of metal on hard acceleration. As we all know from here this leads to damage/galling of the bearings and eventually loud noise / rebuilds. Oil versus filter at different time intervals. Changing the filter does not remove the acid in the oil but may help remove particles left in the filter, changing the oil will remove the acid and the particles but the filter is already at a reduced efficiency so you may be passing particles with the used filter.

Check page 8 of this document from Donaldson (manufacturer of many filters used by OEMs) for more information on the oil sampling analysis
http://www.donaldson.com/en/engine/support/datalibrary/000375.pdf

An analogy - oil is the life blood of your engine, change it an filter at seasons' end to avoid damage through the winter months. Really, what does it cost $30-$50 versus a lower end job of $1000s? Probably more than anyone wanted to know..