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View Full Version : What does everyone do for a living and how do you like it? (Career Search)


KevenAtWakeUSF
02-12-2008, 01:21 AM
I am on my 3rd year as an accounting major at the University of South Florida. I am pretty good at accounting, and doing very well in classes. Only problem is, I can not see myself as being an accountant for the rest of my life. I started accounting because I felt it would be something good to know in the future as someday I plan on running my own business and being my own boss.

As part one of my career search, I would like to know:
*What you guys do for a living
*What do you like about it
*What your daily/weekly duties include
*What do you dislike about it
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING

Thanks guys!

TMCNo1
02-12-2008, 01:29 AM
-Self employed Signwriter and Pinstriper, Vehicle Cleanup and Detailing.
-I do everything including the bookkeeping and no 2 days are alike and that's a good thing.
-Self taught, after being a Draftsman for 13 years.
-More than doubled my income as a Draftsman.

h2oskifreak
02-12-2008, 02:07 AM
Real Estate-love it!
Work like a dog all the time but that's my personality.
Self employment is where it's at.
If you're thinking about it have lots of cash reserves, it takes 3-5 years of negative cash flow. Be prepared to work harder than the next guy, and don't do it if you have a young family. Divorce is a certianty.
I'm 20 years in and if you are good and have staying power you can make good $ even in a down market. Not for the faint of heart. Forget about it if you think it is easy money, you'll be gone in a year or two. I worked 60-70 hrs. 7 days/week for 3 years w/o a day off and that is the honest truth, then it gets better

robisjo
02-12-2008, 02:13 AM
I'm a CPA. Get out while you still can! Ask me in the summer when I'm skiing everyday, the answer might be different.

Marcos
02-12-2008, 04:23 AM
I'm project manager at a Telecom operator in the Netherlands. I am responsible of building the opticalnetwork. Which is always hectic, but I love it, as I can do a lot of my work from my own home. This is convinient, as I live in Italy and work in Holland. So I take the plane to my work.....sounds crazy and it is!8p
For me it's a nice combination of tech and desk work.
I'm trying to start off in the real estate sector in Italy, so I can quit the job and no longer have to fly back and forth...:)
Next to that, in the summer I operate a skischool on lake maggiore. This is more to pay for the hobby then earning a living......:(

STLer645
02-12-2008, 04:33 AM
I'm still in school myself, so I can't exactly answer the question. But I will say that two of my close friends did the 5-year CPA and are now in auditing. They really enjoy it.

I will also share with you my forcasted future career path. I'm personally looking to get into I-Banking, Private Equity or Hedge Funds. I'll be out of undergrad next December and will attempt to go for the MBA the next fall, as I already have a considerable amount of qualifying work experience. If I'm not accepted to a top 20 MBA, I'll probably put in a few 70 hr/week years at a respectable brokerage house and then head for the MBA.

If you want to be your own boss, this time of your life will probably be a lot easier. For me it is networking with extreme net worth individuals, meeting with alums of desired b-schools and generally a tremendous amount of politicking. I already took the LSAT (considered compliance) and I am now beginning to study for the GMAT. In the summer I'll be pursuing an unpaid internship (debating between firms in San Fran and NYC.) After months of writing applications and interviewing, I will likely be weighing whether I should hold out for the Yales, Cornells and UNC's or consider the Rochesters, IUs or Pepperdines of the world. In finance it is all about rank and perception, as investment houses and fund managers view academic pedigree as shorthand for intellectual capabilities.

For an entrepreneur (in my opinion) you can just pursue angles which seem beneficial and enjoyable to you. My father is what I would consider to be an extremely successful entrepreneur and did it all without spending a single semester in college. Different industries bring obviously different requirements. Prior to founding your business, I would definitely try to gain employment at the exact type of firm which you hope to start.

Sorry for the long post, but I hope it is useful. Insomnia has set in.

JoshBuzz
02-12-2008, 05:01 AM
I'm running into the same wall as you Kevan, I was an English major, just switched to communications, I don't plan on rolling in the big bucks, but I am going to venture into the wake/boating world as a career and not just a hobby. I've already got a great job opportunity at Houston MC working with people I love to be around, in a great atmosphere, and I'm very well networked for a 19 year old. I love networking, and would love to be a representative for Hype or for MC in the near future!!

msutoad
02-12-2008, 05:40 AM
I am a Network Engineer and love it. I work alot of hours but that is because I love my job. No 2 days are the same, and I get to work with bleeding edge technology. Pay is very good, but not over the top. With many years in, you can get the pay to be over the top, but it is a tough road to get there with so many people coming out of college in engineering. Good Luck

ETC
02-12-2008, 09:48 AM
I too am a CPA, must be some allure to MC's for us:), but have never done public work. I interned and have worked predominately for the same Fortune 100 company for the past 13 years.

Pluses I now have five weeks of vacation (sometimes can be hard to take it all). The pay is at a point that it would be difficult to replace in my market. The work various from running a spreadsheet all day long to the occasional interesting analysis. If you work around people you enjoy it makes a huge difference.

Disadvantages; we have gone through lay off mode the last five years which can wear on you. Like I said a lot of spreadsheet jockey work and doing things because somebody else thought it would be good to know when you know it will be meaningless. I primarily do forecast, budget, and Board related materials so the work load does have peaks and valleys.

I would say you will be quite happy to have the accounting background and you may want to give it a shot working for somebody else for awhile. If you can find the right group of people you might as well learn on their dime and then take that with you somewhere.

Good Luck.

Slinkyredfoot
02-12-2008, 09:59 AM
I am a sales manager for a construction equipment company.

I really love the friends and relationships I have developed over the years in this business not to mention the diversity of each day relating to new challenges in this business.

The drawbacks are the slow season, right now in winter, and the competitiveness of pricing and profit margins. At times I do have issues with ownership and some of the bone headed moves and ideas they come up with on a pretty regular basis....

This job affords me the luxury of owning a lake house and a Mastercraft, enough cash flow to pay my taxes with a bit left over for large amounts of ice cold beer......

D3skier
02-12-2008, 10:05 AM
I am a Network Engineer and love it. I work alot of hours but that is because I love my job. No 2 days are the same, and I get to work with bleeding edge technology. Pay is very good, but not over the top. With many years in, you can get the pay to be over the top, but it is a tough road to get there with so many people coming out of college in engineering. Good Luck

I'm in the IT field as well and don't have a lot of years in and it has been a real struggle to start making any decent $$$ it's been about 7 years now and still struggling to get out of the helpdesk roles....

SkiDog
02-12-2008, 10:16 AM
Let's see, I used to build houses. Not anymore. I've been sitting on a spec house for right at 2 years now. $4800 per month X 24. That math ain't pretty! Now all I do is commercial construction. Shoulda got into that a long time ago.:(

Monte
02-12-2008, 10:17 AM
Insurance.......................... 7 yrs............... I like it..

School Skier
02-12-2008, 10:19 AM
I'm a Head Custodian for a school district and love it except for this winter with all the snow to move.

ttu
02-12-2008, 10:20 AM
my degree is in restaurant/ hotel mgmt. did that for 4 years after college. good money. Bad hours... and a lot of them.

became a insurance adjuster for 5 years. really enjoyed that but let me just say, you don't make a whole lot of friends:rolleyes:

became a insurance agent with the same company and i have been doing this 10+ years. really enjoy except when the storms roll thru.

good money.

Monte
02-12-2008, 10:22 AM
my degree is in restaurant/ hotel mgmt. did that for 4 years after college. good money. Bad hours... and a lot of them.

became a insurance adjuster for 5 years. really enjoyed that but let me just say, you don't make a whole lot of friends:rolleyes:

became a insurance agent with the same company and i have been doing this 10+ years. really enjoy except when the storms roll thru.

good money.

My degree is in Commercial Recreation Management/ Business Admin.. Funny how Insurance Agents find their niche isn't it:rolleyes:

lazypiper
02-12-2008, 10:32 AM
Elevator Mechanic in NYC when not reading TMC threads. Love it good union job.:cool:

A.I. Rider
02-12-2008, 10:38 AM
I am 26 and have been in our family owned commercial construction/development company for the past 4 years since I graduated college. Got my degree in information systems mgt. and am glad I did. Moving heavily into franchise hotel development with some partners and love every bit of it. Money is great when the comm construction market is good, but when it backs down, we feel it as a small business, and I feel it in the bank account. I have been blessed to be able to own my own home and have a job that allows me to get on the water when time allows for it, and in an MC nonetheless.

drbesvold1
02-12-2008, 11:05 AM
i work for northwest airlines as a supervisor on the ramp loading and unloading the aircraft been with them for 10 years now plus im a weekened warrior with the U.S Navy been in the military 11 years now

Sodar
02-12-2008, 11:09 AM
*What you guys do for a living- Currently, I am working for a medium-sized commercial construction company as a Project Manager.
*What do you like about it- Everyday is different! I love problem solving and essentially that is all I do.
*What your daily/weekly duties include- Only set routines/duties are a few meetings every week. My day to day tasks include everything from writing meeting minutes, dealing with architectual f-ups, scheduling, billing, etc.
*What do you dislike about it- I hate not making the money for myself! I need to get out on my own, but know I do not have nearly the experience to do that at 25 years old.
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)- I have interned and worked the three major facets of RE Development, knowing that each one would help me when I step out on my own. My first two years of college, I worked for a finacial planner/stock broker. Great experience and really taught me alot about managing money. My last two years of college, I worked for a commercial real estate brokerage. Not so great experience and I know that I never want to do what these guys do! Cold calls, back stabbing and buyer/seller conflicts of interest were NOT my forte! Finally, in my last semester of college, I decided to fill my schedule up with 22 units and get a major in constructiong management. I figured it would compliment my Real Estate Finance degree quite nicely and it really has. Hopefully, I will be on my own by the age of 30 with a few investors. Straight out of college, I began working for a HUGE West Coast contractor. It was really cool, but I was put on a project that was too big to really learn and get a grasp on the whol project. I decided I needed to downsize and find a company that would be doing the same work I want to do. So, here I am! It has been about 7 months and I am loving my new position. I am really able to see the whole picture, compared to the little part I was doing at my last company.
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)- Just an overview of the profession. As an entry level project engineer, expect to make between $50k-$65k+. As an entry level Project Manager, expect between $70k- $100k. and as a Senior Project Manager $100k - $150k+ depending on experience.
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING- I have not been here long enough to really get a grasp on Vacation time. I did take a hit in the department, by giving up 3 weeks vacation for 2 weeks. I figured that the 2hour commute, down to a 5 minute commute would more than add up to an additional vacation week! As for perks, most companies will give you a gas card & car allowance because you use the car for driving out to the jobsite so frequently. I gotta tell ya, this REALLY helps!

point1234
02-12-2008, 11:19 AM
I run a multi-color printing press. I work 3 12 hour shifts a week. Either I work Mon-Wed, or Thrurs-Saturday. Work 36 hours and get paid for 40. I figured it out the other day I work about 165 days a year give or take a few. Some days are worse than others but I just think of the 4 days off a week that I have.

flipper
02-12-2008, 11:53 AM
I'm an Operating Engineer......fancy name for a heavy equipment operator. Worked in rock quarries running equipment, and rock crushing plants. I now run a asphalt plant making the asphalt, not to be mistaken for laying it. I have fun for the most part.

RexDog1
02-12-2008, 12:10 PM
Civil Engineer :D
I started my Company 9/9/99 I was sick of working for someone
(I don’t take orders well)

Now I have 16 employees, and I Love my job, Hate MY Boss……… :rolleyes: LOL working for your self is the only way to go IMO, it give me the freedom to spend with my kids
Yes you do need to make payroll every 2 weeks, but if you work hard treat your employees well ……… it all falls into place :D

My Daily Duties Hummm I get up at 5 am get to the office about 6am or so? Review the jobs we are working on I have 12 to 16 conference calls a week, QC and red line jobs before they go out to the field, bid on new jobs coming in, look at timelines, review billing, drive out new jobs, and I finish about 12 noon

What do I make a year………… well my wife 8p reads TT and she would find out so…….No

mcdoon
02-12-2008, 12:15 PM
Director of IT for a midwest manufacturer. Good work, good company for the most part, it pays OK. I'm thankful for the opportunities I've been given, but the grass looks greener in many other states (I'm in Michigan).

Leroy
02-12-2008, 12:16 PM
I would say double up and get a second degree in a field you would like to work in. I hear a lot about double degrees now.

*What you guys do for a living Electrical Engineer but mostly management now.
*What do you like about it Fun work, good pay, comfortable work enviroment.
*What your daily/weekly duties include Planning, meetings, business strategy, acquisition research, launching new products, and technology assessment.
*What do you dislike about it Very little, but normally pretty demanding job.
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc) 4 year BSEE degree and worked co-op for 1 year.
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING Generally EE's are starting around $55k now and are over $100k by 15 years (wide range). Normally you will travel around the world a lot, start with 3 weeks vac and have 5 by 20 years.

OhioProstar
02-12-2008, 12:24 PM
Regional Sales Manager for an IT Security Company focused on Databases. Love the IT space, has its ups and downs, but sales is really a job where you can give yourself a raise by working harder. If you work smart, the hours are pretty flexible.

BrianM
02-12-2008, 12:27 PM
Let's see, I used to build houses. Not anymore. I've been sitting on a spec house for right at 2 years now. $4800 per month X 24. That math ain't pretty! Now all I do is commercial construction. Shoulda got into that a long time ago.:(

Ouch! That is one h3ll of a spec house.

Dbuck
02-12-2008, 12:53 PM
I am an accountant in the healthcare field. As a controller for a medium sized hospital, I work with general ledger, textbook accounting on a daily basis, but also have other duties and special projects to keep it from being the same day in day out. Right after college, I worked for a small accounting firm, and the second tax season was enough for me! Then I "wandered in the wilderness" for a number of years before returning to accounting via healthcare. That accounting degree aquired so many years ago was my entry into a field I really enjoy.

Accounting is a great degree to have in any kind of business, regardless of what you ultimately do with it. Accounting is the language of business, and in today's environment, is increasingly important in understanding cause and effects in business. Because of this, accounting is a very versatile degree and many types of organizations hire accounting graduates not necessarily to practice accounting, but because of the general analytical and logical base of education. Accounting is also a great basis from which to pursue advanced professional degrees such as law.

Now a few "do as I say, not as I did" advice that I've learned from my mistakes rather than successes!

1. Pass the CPA exam as soon as you can. If you are doing well, perhaps you will sail through the first time, but do it now(as soon as you are eligible) It will be easier now than ever.

2. Do you get a Master's degree for your fifth year or BPA-bachelor of profeesional accountancy? Either way, stick with it for the five year progam. You learn more and it looks better on your resume.

3. Working for a national or regional accounting firm with a variety of clients is a great beginning. You may find you love accounting and stay with it, or you may encounter other fields in the course of this work that interest you more.

4. Some people will tell you to get your masters in accounting or an MBA now, while you are still in college. Others will tell you to work a couple years and then get your MBA because the experience will make it more practical. Both groups are right; it just depends on your situation and opportunities. Some employers will help you with this in time, money or both. The point is, do it as soon as practical because again it will be easier now than ever.

These four points are I believe worth at least 10-30k per year in income to you now. Either you will be offered more in the competitive environment because of your skills and experience, or because of your enhanced resume, you will be separated from others for higher positions for which you seek. Ultimately, your success depends on you; your personality and performance and your ability to work with others, but these four items enhance your opportunities to demonstrate your abilities.

Lastly, I do not say all this to discourage you from entrepreneurial activities. We need entrepreneurs and doing something on your own is extremely rewarding in many ways. Completing your degree in accounting and possibly working in the field for a while does not hinder that, but rather can open your eyes and possibly opportunities to explore it.

Hey, probably more advice than you wanted, but no extra charge!!

Good luck in all you do!

ShamrockIV
02-12-2008, 01:13 PM
I work full time for the Tennessee Amry National Guard.
I work in property management branch.
we field and make sure units acount for their property(tanks, trucks, weapons, etc!!!)
i have been working for TNARNG for almost 15 years now!!
i am waiting on urgrade here and my wife to graduate from college(she is back in school after 10 years of being out) so we can have more income to do more of the things we love to do!!!

uawaterskier
02-12-2008, 01:21 PM
Im currently studying ME (mech eng) at Alabama. And for all you engineers how do you like your job. My dad is also an engineer and he HATES his job and the management ect. I really don't want to do something I hate.

dmayer84
02-12-2008, 01:28 PM
Wondering if any of you IT guys have any advice for me. I want to get into networking and I currently have Bachelors in Comp Sci, Comp Tia Security plus, MCSE, CCNA and should have my CCNP by the middle of March if all goes right. I just cant seen to make the jump from pc support over there (approx 4 years of offical experience)

VOLFAN
02-12-2008, 01:32 PM
I work for TVA ~ I am in Procurement
It pays well
Order parts ~ Recieve parts ~ Issue parts normal warehouse stuff
I have to drive 70 miles to get here
I worked as a contractor for 2 years
I just sink most of my income into retirement. We pretty much live off my wife's income. She is a Realtor.

So if you would like to buy something around Dale Hollow or Center Hill let me know and I can hook ya up with a great Realtor!

Danimal
02-12-2008, 01:40 PM
I am Production Manager of a printing company specializing in onpack coupons and promotional games. 18 years of printing experience, no college to speak off. All my training came on the job. It can be a stressfull job, though, as it is very deadline oriented.

Chicago190
02-12-2008, 02:16 PM
I'm starting full time after I graduate in May as a case assistant in the real estate department of a law firm. I'll also be studying for the LSATs this summer and will most likely end up becoming a real estate attorney in 4 years.

lanier92prostar
02-12-2008, 02:16 PM
Health and PE teacher. Perks: summers off, get payed to play all day.
Negatives: Middle school kids wear on you. I have been doing this for 17 years and would not trade it for anything. I only wish it payed better, but I get about 9 weeks of vacation each year.

LKNMC
02-12-2008, 02:17 PM
We own a live production company that does sound lighting staging video for various tours

*What you guys do for a living: ^^

*What do you like about it: it is a really unique job

*What your daily/weekly duties include: servicing equipment and getting ready for the next tour

*What do you dislike about it: very hard job

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc): go to collage get a MBA and start the business

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information): depends

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING: you travel a lot

loeweb
02-12-2008, 02:40 PM
Health and PE teacher. Perks: summers off, get payed to play all day.
Negatives: Middle school kids wear on you. I have been doing this for 17 years and would not trade it for anything. I only wish it payed better, but I get about 9 weeks of vacation each year.

Same here. Love the vacation, kids can wear on you though. I seems as though any more we have a lot of kids who want to be great, but aren't willing to pay the price that comes with it. They want to talk the talk but not walk the walk. I've been in 5 years now, and am currently looking to move wife and kids to a more progressive district.

NU-skier
02-12-2008, 03:10 PM
Been in Telecom and IT for 30 yrs, currently the Director for a shop that services 80 countries.

*What do you like about it: Never a dull day.

*What your daily/weekly duties include: Keeping the monkeys fed and off my back.

*What do you dislike about it: time zones and people that can't figure them out. :mad:

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc): Started at the bottom and worked like a dog 24x7 learning everything I could doing what others couldn't or wouldn't when I was young to get ahead.. and then moved away from family in Nebraska for a job in Carolina where the lakes aren't used for snow machines in the winter!!!

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information): More than I thought I would ever make... and now the nest is empty and I only have to share with my wife! 8p

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING: Getting paid to play with technology and always learning about the possibilities of it from my staff. :worthy:

rwoznock
02-12-2008, 03:18 PM
Warehouse Distribution and Logistics Manager for a consumer paper products company here in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Done this for 26 years, the last 6 with my current employer. Love the job! I get to work with a lot of different people and move a lot of paper products across the eastern US!

JKTX21
02-12-2008, 03:28 PM
I am on my 3rd year as an accounting major at the University of South Florida. I am pretty good at accounting, and doing very well in classes. Only problem is, I can not see myself as being an accountant for the rest of my life.


I was in your shoes not too long ago and took the accounting route. Liked my job and traveling for a few years, but then decided staying at the office behind my desk every night until midnight wasn't for me. Accounting is the only degree in business worth having, in my opinion.

I now work in the luxury automotive business and fits my personality better. My career has been short compared to a lot here, but I can agree with finding something you can do well and be prepared to do what the "other guy" won't do in order to be highly sucessful.

Ric
02-12-2008, 03:40 PM
I run a church for loggers

Harvey
02-12-2008, 05:11 PM
*What you guys do for a living: I work in the sub prime auto lending arena as a Team Lead Credit Analyst. (Trust me it sounds fancier that it is.)
*What do you like about it: I dont like it. It was an easy transfer from my previous career, automobile dealer finance manager, at a time when the job market was BAD. That is why I am currently working toward a Masters degree in Statistics.
*What your daily/weekly duties include: My duties include sitting at my desk all day long reviewing credit applications, working to improve individual analyst skills, team production, and overall effectiveness. In short I not only look for customer whose credit, residence and job profile is conducive to a high intrest loan while selling the automobile dealer that our money is better than another banks money but I train and aide my team in the pursuit of that.
*What do you dislike about it: I dislike that I spend everyday doing the same thing. There is a large amount of change with this business, however that change is not in the least exciting, i.e. one week something is against company policy and the next week it is perfectly acceptable by company standards.
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc): I really didn't have to do much. I got a BBA with a concentration in Management but what really got me this job was my experience in the auto business.
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information): When I was a finance manager it would vary but 100K was not abnormal however the hours were 70-80 a week. Now I make less than that but work 40 hours on the nose most weeks. A starting out first time Credit Analyst can make 30-35K and an experienced one can make up to 65-70K.
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING: Perks? I would say that compared to what I was doing before this has great hours and vacation time but that is a stretch.

In truth I am almost 30, 8 years out of college and I am realizing that I was in such a rush to get my 4 year degree that I forgot to look at what I REALLY enjoyed doing. I was extremely good at math in high school, I was in Calc II as a senior. When I got to college I seemingly forgot that, went the easier route (for me), and studied business.

My advice to you is this: spend some time figuring out what you really like doing and then find a way to make money doing it. I have learned over the last year that I really miss learning new things and being able to apply them to a problem. I miss the problem solving, so I am getting a degree and hopefully a career in problem solving.

lanier92prostar
02-12-2008, 05:19 PM
Same here. Love the vacation, kids can wear on you though. I seems as though any more we have a lot of kids who want to be great, but aren't willing to pay the price that comes with it. They want to talk the talk but not walk the walk. I've been in 5 years now, and am currently looking to move wife and kids to a more progressive district.

I don't know where you are at, but sometimes the smaller districts are more progressive. I teach in Fulton County near Atlanta, but the smaller districts north of here in Forsyth are more Progressive than we are with curriculum and Technology. I just can't afford the pay cut right now or I would move. My wife moved to the smaller district 8 years ago and loves it. Best of luck to you.

icewake
02-12-2008, 05:47 PM
I am a full-time mechanical engineering student but during the summers or when i get tired of school I work doing aerodynamic/store separation testing for various airplanes/missles/etc. in our massive wind tunnels. It is a lot of fun and I really enjoy it

dpolen
02-12-2008, 06:08 PM
I am in IT Sales one of the largest IT companies in the world. I as previously Project Manager for big IT projects doign consulting. Fiercely competitive industry, pay good when you're selling. When I was doing consulting, travel was only fun for the first year or so, then it got old really quick. I love sales now, can't see myself going back to the other side of things. This is not a low stress industry. Good luck with your search!!!

dpolen
02-12-2008, 06:11 PM
Wondering if any of you IT guys have any advice for me. I want to get into networking and I currently have Bachelors in Comp Sci, Comp Tia Security plus, MCSE, CCNA and should have my CCNP by the middle of March if all goes right. I just cant seen to make the jump from pc support over there (approx 4 years of offical experience)

Just a suggestion, talk to business partners/IT resellers in your area. IBM has a lot of them and I know many guys who make a lot more dough working for the partners than they do for the larger companies. They can sell your existing skills to customers while you build the others. Just a thought. People skills go a long way if they can trust you with their customers.

mrprostar
02-12-2008, 06:12 PM
I am a jack of many trades for a concrete production company. I do a wide variety of things from the daily paperwork to running one of the plants. I also designed and maintain the company web page. My dad is a partner in the company so I am learning a lot and will probably fill his shoes someday. I really do like my job. There is a lot more to concrete than people think so I still have a lot to learn. The money is good for being a few months out of college. Check out our website if you are trying to waste time. www.dukecityredimix.com

jimmer2880
02-12-2008, 06:52 PM
IT guy here. Been in the business since graduating HS in 1990. Spent some time at college, no degree though. Networking with people is how I got where I am.

Work is fun, as long as the politics don't get too bad. I work for a 140,000 employee company, so tomorrow is never the same as today. But, working for a 140,000 employee company, I think the politics are worse than the other companies I have worked for. If I were to do it again, I'd start my own 1, or 2 person company and 1099 myself to the company I'm working for now as a sub.

shepherd
02-12-2008, 07:16 PM
*What you guys do for a living Pimp
*What do you like about it I am my own boss
*What your daily/weekly duties include Driving beautiful women around town, threatening customers, administering company health plan
*What do you dislike about it Being around beautiful, high maintenance women for long periods of time can wear you down
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc) Kill a man
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information) I can't tell you. For tax reasons
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING It's not as glamorous as you think. And it can be very dangerous. Stay in school

shepherd
02-12-2008, 07:19 PM
OK, I was kidding. :rolleyes:

I won't tell you what I do. I've heard enough lawyer jokes.


Ooops. :cool:

learjet2230
02-12-2008, 07:21 PM
I am on my 3rd year as an accounting major at the University of South Florida. I am pretty good at accounting, and doing very well in classes. Only problem is, I can not see myself as being an accountant for the rest of my life. I started accounting because I felt it would be something good to know in the future as someday I plan on running my own business and being my own boss.

As part one of my career search, I would like to know:
*What you guys do for a living
*What do you like about it
*What your daily/weekly duties include
*What do you dislike about it
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING

Thanks guys!

Currently I am a Maintenance Instructor on the Learjet 40 series. basically teach new owners about all the systems on their new aircraft. I started out with Learjet in 97 as a final assembler on the 45 and ended as a lead. 3 years of that and Texas was calling me. I moved back to Dallas and worked at the service center there for Learjet for 6 years. Got fed up with the arm twisting, politics, and coming home smelling like Jet A and 5606 hyd fluid. I now talk for 8-10 hours a day and do sim checkout in a Level D full motion sim. Always wanted to be a pilot in the military. Had the smarts and physical ability. All military branches rejected me due to childhood Leukemia at age 11. Not even a physical, even though I ws a state track qualifier (2 years), regional finalist in swimming, and standout in soccer. I moved to the next best thing, and recieved my pilot ticket on my own.

Things I like about it----Everyone comes from all over the world to learn from my experiences. Makes you feel good when they leave after two weeks with a bleeding brain and a solid grasp on the product.

Daily/weekly duties....depends if I have a class or not. If I am in class, then I show up around 7, set up class and start at 8, go to 3. Sim from 3-5p. If I am not in class I update courseware, field calls or emails from customers, prep for the next class.

Dislikes.....I have a HUGE commute! I drive 72 miles one way. Just to live on the lake. Luckily my car gets about 35+ and I only burn about 20 gallons a week. We travel quite a bit. I have to spend 2 weeks in Lincoln, NE starting the 16th of Feb. One instructor is going to Berlin for 5 weeks! I also miss turning wrenches. Being able to solve a problem that no one else has been able to. Makes ya feel good. Miss the smell of burning jet fuel and the noise!

Climbing the ladder....Just started off in the trenches. Each step of the way I tried to outshine and work the hardest. Wasn't hard to do in a lazy union shop in Wichita. Always wanted a new and tougher challenge. Never was satisfied being satisfied!! Did the 5 year plan in college. Got my Airframe & Powerplant (A&P) and an AAS in Aviation Maintenance, along with a BS in Aviation Management. I think most degrees today are useless depending on the individual. I have seen guys with no education work circles around people with Masters, and vica versa, so to each is his/her own. This is a choice you have to make, and the field you decide to persue will pretty much answer the question.

Pay...When I was on "the floor" (mechanic), pay was pretty good. My move to Lear from the job before that doubled my pay! Left the floor after 10 years and was well, comfortable! Took a 5K pay cut to do what I am doing today. I have a killer boss and he takes pretty good care of us. Might give us the day off, maybe the week off, etc... We have been blowing our projected numbers out of the water so he rewards us well. Also leaves us alone at work. No bird dogging. We make him look good, he lets us feel good!!

Best of luck, and dont be afraid to make the wrong decision. A wrong decision is better than not making one in this instance. I see so many kids pressured into what their parents want them to be. Little Johnny will play football, and will only go to Oklahoma, etc.....Just not right. You might make 5 career changes before you find one that you really like. Enjoy the ride and hit it full steam!

suedv
02-12-2008, 07:47 PM
*What you guys do for a living: I work in the sub prime auto lending arena as a Team Lead Credit Analyst. (Trust me it sounds fancier that it is.)
*What do you like about it: I dont like it. It was an easy transfer from my previous career, automobile dealer finance manager, at a time when the job market was BAD. That is why I am currently working toward a Masters degree in Statistics.
*What your daily/weekly duties include: My duties include sitting at my desk all day long reviewing credit applications, working to improve individual analyst skills, team production, and overall effectiveness. In short I not only look for customer whose credit, residence and job profile is conducive to a high intrest loan while selling the automobile dealer that our money is better than another banks money but I train and aide my team in the pursuit of that.
*What do you dislike about it: I dislike that I spend everyday doing the same thing. There is a large amount of change with this business, however that change is not in the least exciting, i.e. one week something is against company policy and the next week it is perfectly acceptable by company standards.
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc): I really didn't have to do much. I got a BBA with a concentration in Management but what really got me this job was my experience in the auto business.
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information): When I was a finance manager it would vary but 100K was not abnormal however the hours were 70-80 a week. Now I make less than that but work 40 hours on the nose most weeks. A starting out first time Credit Analyst can make 30-35K and an experienced one can make up to 65-70K.
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING: Perks? I would say that compared to what I was doing before this has great hours and vacation time but that is a stretch.

In truth I am almost 30, 8 years out of college and I am realizing that I was in such a rush to get my 4 year degree that I forgot to look at what I REALLY enjoyed doing. I was extremely good at math in high school, I was in Calc II as a senior. When I got to college I seemingly forgot that, went the easier route (for me), and studied business.

My advice to you is this: spend some time figuring out what you really like doing and then find a way to make money doing it. I have learned over the last year that I really miss learning new things and being able to apply them to a problem. I miss the problem solving, so I am getting a degree and hopefully a career in problem solving.

Harvey, I really appreciate the honesty in your post. I'm going to show it to my son this evening.

I don't think your experience is all that unusual. My first couple of jobs just out of college weren't jobs I liked and they weren't a good fit for me. Thirteen years and a couple babies after graduating from college I went back to school and got a masters degree. I worked my tail off in grad school and learned so much more than I ever did in college. Now I have a job that I really like and that is very rewarding to me. I think you hit one of the most common problems students have right on when said you forgot what you were good at and took the easy way out.

Keep working and you will reach your goals.

JoshBuzz
02-12-2008, 07:54 PM
Anyone with a marine architecture degree?? My roommate is an architecture major, and I was thinking about possibly venturing into the buisness of designing yachts and houseboats and the such.

76S&S
02-12-2008, 08:04 PM
*What you guys do for a living - Accountant (bean counter) for a large General Contractor
*What do you like about it - Great Company, I'm involved with the technology for Accounting and really enjoy that aspect.
*What your daily/weekly duties include - Manage 30 women and 1 guy, lot's of meetings and problem solving..........very little actual accounting.
*What do you dislike about it - Managing 30 women:( :(
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc) Accounting degree and previous jobs to get the managerial experience.
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information) depends on the co.
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING



Overall a good job...............sometimes the grass seems greener elsewhere but often it is much browner when you get there.

Gerd
02-12-2008, 08:06 PM
There used to be Dear Abby that went, my mother ran off when I was 3, my dads in jail for fraud, my one sister is a crack head and the other is a prostitute, and my oldest brother is in a mental institution.
The problem I have is I just started dating this girl I really like, should I tell her I have an uncle that's a Pawnbroker.
I'm that uncle and I laugh every time I think of that story. :D :D

SunCoast 83
02-12-2008, 08:35 PM
Assistant Store Manager for Publix. We are a 900 store, Grocery Retail chain in the southeast. Great benefits, 100 Best Companies to Work For (8 years in a row). I love retail. hours suck during the Holiday season, however as you can advance, they get a little less brutal. All promotions in this company are in-house as we are privately owned. However ASM's start around 72k and go up to 85k. SM's are at 100k.plus. I want to retire at 53

M-Funf
02-12-2008, 08:39 PM
I'm a Mechanical Engineer for a Medical Device Research company. I really like what I do. For the most part, we just do R&D and make prototypes, then try them in the lab. If everything works out, we raise VC money and start a new company, or sell everything to the highest bidder. I also like it because it pays very well, and the stock options in the new companies are amazing (though they take a while before they pay off)

In previous companies, I've been a Director of Engineering on the management track, but after several years of that, it's good to get back to doing engineering work and let somebody else deal with that other stuff.

I will say this; the path you have chosen (accounting), as well as some other professions, are "transferable". By that, I mean that you can probably work anywhere and find somebody who needs a good numbers guy...whether it's GL, AP, AR, whatever. I chose a career that has some hotspots around the country, but it's fairly limited. My wife is in HR, so if we decided to move, it would be the wife who would get a job easily, and I would take a while.

damaged442
02-12-2008, 08:46 PM
I am on my 3rd year as an accounting major at the University of South Florida. I am pretty good at accounting, and doing very well in classes. Only problem is, I can not see myself as being an accountant for the rest of my life. I started accounting because I felt it would be something good to know in the future as someday I plan on running my own business and being my own boss.

As part one of my career search, I would like to know:
*What you guys do for a living
*What do you like about it
*What your daily/weekly duties include
*What do you dislike about it
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING

Thanks guys!

Presently, I am an organic chemist doing pharmaceutical research and development. I work for a company that is outsourced by various other pharma companies to make active pharmaceutical ingredients or bits and pieces to make them. My weekly routine changes depending on what project I'm on. Sometimes I'll be running small scale, like a gram or two. Other times, I'll be running batches that are several kilos. I like the fact that my day to day changes, and I believe I'll be making a difference to someone somewhere down the line. I dislike being underpaid and underappreciated. (who doesn't, right?) Irrational customers that have difficulty with the English language are right up there for the dislike list too. In college, I dual majored in Biology and Chemistry, then got my MS in Chemistry. I felt after all that punishment, I really should look into getting a job in that profession. From what I've seen through the Americal Chemical Society, most in my profession at my level would be in the $50-75K range. Obviously, the PhD would make a significant salary difference, but I'm not going that route! I am fortunate to be right down the road from home, so the commute is short. I go in at 6am, get out about 4pm, still enough light to wash cars, mow the lawn, etc. (The boat is about an hour and a half away, so that's weekend only) :mad: I've been doing this about 5 and a half years, it pays the bills, and I must be doing something right because I still have both my arms and both my eyebrows! (although I did set myself on fire) :eek3: Accounting is much safer! Good luck!

Harvey
02-12-2008, 08:55 PM
Harvey, I really appreciate the honesty in your post. I'm going to show it to my son this evening.

I don't think your experience is all that unusual. My first couple of jobs just out of college weren't jobs I liked and they weren't a good fit for me. Thirteen years and a couple babies after graduating from college I went back to school and got a masters degree. I worked my tail off in grad school and learned so much more than I ever did in college. Now I have a job that I really like and that is very rewarding to me. I think you hit one of the most common problems students have right on when said you forgot what you were good at and took the easy way out.

Keep working and you will reach your goals.

Thanks, Sue. I really do think the key is to do what you love first. In high school there were two things enjoyed that I was also good at: math and science. Somehow I ended up with a business degree? Took me 7 years or so to figure it why.

teeter
02-12-2008, 09:10 PM
I got a degree in Operations Research, (very similar to Industrial Engineering, systems engineering, management science) all very similar degrees but it basically is problem solving. A lot of efficiency and optimization (read statistics). Very satisfying in my opinion to be able to take a bunch of numbers that mean nothing by themselves and actually come up with a solution that can be applied and save a company time money etc.

Although i really enjoy that stuff i just didn't think i could take sitting in an office all day, and am now trying to fly planes for a living.

H20BOY
02-12-2008, 10:39 PM
I am currently a field engineer with Michelin. What that means, I am the technical liason between fleet customers and the tire designers. I also do all technical training in field. This has nothing to do with my degrees - Finance and Computer Info Systems.

What I like...Everyday is different. I truly enjoy doing the training.
Pay is not great, but company has great benefits so it all balances out.

I was an accounting major until my junior year. Biggest mistake I made in college was switching out of accounting. Accounting is the most versatile business related degree you can get. Stick with it. Once your out you can decide what direction you want to go.

JoshBuzz
02-12-2008, 10:57 PM
I got a degree in Operations Research, (very similar to Industrial Engineering, systems engineering, management science) all very similar degrees but it basically is problem solving. A lot of efficiency and optimization (read statistics). Very satisfying in my opinion to be able to take a bunch of numbers that mean nothing by themselves and actually come up with a solution that can be applied and save a company time money etc.

Although i really enjoy that stuff i just didn't think i could take sitting in an office all day, and am now trying to fly planes for a living.

What airlines?? Note to self, don't fly with teeter!!

:D

teeter
02-12-2008, 11:12 PM
Just a student pilot in the air force

tex
02-12-2008, 11:17 PM
As part one of my career search, I would like to know:
*What you guys do for a living-Juvenile Probation Officer
*What do you like about it-Sounds corny but I like trying to make a difference. I also have great stories.
*What your daily/weekly duties include-Right now I work intake dealing with kids who are first arrested. Make decisions about who stays in detention and who gets to go home.
*What do you dislike about it-a lot of politics, gossip, and junk like that.
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)-jump through hoops to get my foot in the door.
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)-Government work=work hard not enough $$$
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING
Gives me time with the family...great vacation...find what you like to do and don't be afraid to take a lesser position to get your foot in a door. What seems like a long time right now will just be a snap of the fingers later. Good luck!

suedv
02-12-2008, 11:37 PM
What I do for a living – land protection for a large international non-profit conservation organization.

What I like about my job – I get a very strong sense of satisfaction knowing that I’m doing something that will benefit people, plants and animals (many of which are listed as threatened or endangered), and our environment today and for many, many years to come. I feel really good when I help add land to the National Forest system; obtain land for a nature preserve or county park; lead in collaboration to help various partner organizations work through complex land deals with multiple government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and private land owners; and etc. It makes me feel good knowing that my conservation work can be good for the environment, economic development, people and recreation, and the next generation of kids who haven’t even been born yet.

My daily work duties vary from week to week – I work with our science and stewardship staff to plan projects. I write government grants. I do all stages of real estate work from negotiating deals; assembling financial resource; ordering title, appraisal, and surveys; do parts of phase 1 environmental assessments; writing purchase agreements; negotiating conservation easements; working through zoning issues; transferring land out; and etc. I work with landowners to help them decide conservation options for their land.

The main thing I don’t like about my job is the driving. I handle all the protection work for the Lake Michigan drainage which equals to the western ½ of the Lower Peninsula. Some weeks I have meetings and site visits that have me on the road quite a bit. This winter has been nasty and summer construction isn’t so fun.

Background to get the job – Master of Public Administration degree, previous job as President/CEO of a community development corporation where I wrote grants, managed finances, purchased and sold property with government funds, planned housing development projects, worked with the city on the master plan, neighborhood planning and zoning issues.

Perks of the job – As part of my job I have to go to land I’m working on. I get to be on some of the most beautiful land in the state of Michigan. I have work days when I can go out and TAKE LOTS OF PICTURES!

JoshBuzz
02-12-2008, 11:39 PM
where are you stationed Teeter?? I'm in college station right now, but have got some close family ties with some higher ups in the air force

shepherd
02-12-2008, 11:46 PM
BTW, I work as the legal counsel/patent attorney at a Navy R&D facility. There are plenty of opportunities in the marine engineering field other than ship/boat design. Our new hires get involved in acoustics (sonar), remotely operated and unmanned surface and underwater vehicles, and other marine-related stuff. We hire marine, electrical, computer, mechanical, and other engineers fresh out of college. Business has been booming.

erkoehler
02-13-2008, 12:35 AM
As part one of my career search, I would like to know:
*What you guys do for a living-Chicago MasterCraft Business Manager
*What do you like about it-Being able to be around the boats, working with customers who are making their dreams come true, and lets not forget spending tons of time on the water in the summer!
*What your daily/weekly duties include-EVERYTHING! Warranty claims, scheduling, deal paperwork, financing, sales, service questions, parts questions, helping to order boats, customer service, etc.
*What do you dislike about it-Long hours in the summer take away personal time on the water.
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)-Started selling boats as a side job, worked as many hours as I could with no salary and developed customers and contacts.
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family-I receive approx. 2 weeks vacation after working almost 3 years, work approximately 70-80 hour weeks during peak season going 7 days a week, get to spend extra time on the water pulling demos and events, etc.

whitedog
02-13-2008, 12:42 AM
I have a job just a little off beat compared to most. A couple on here deal with my counter parts in there part of the country.

*What you guys do for a living : I work as an agronomist for a local cooperative in So Central WI.

For those who don't know, I sell fertilizer, seed and weed killers to farmers as well as help them to maximizer the production of the crops they grow


*What do you like about it: I get the opportunity to work for and with some of the hardest working people in the country, every farm operation is different and each offers its own challenges for me to help maximize productivity.

*What your daily/weekly duties include: Visiting agricultural producers on a daily basis, soil testing, making fertilizer, seed, manure application, and herbicide application plans I also work with farmers and government agencies to make sure all farming operations meet government regulations on tillage practices, manure and drop nutrient applications and assist clients with proper record keeping.

*What do you dislike about it long hours in April may and June 80-100 hrs per week

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc) I have a 4 yr degree in soil sicence an agri business plus 22 years of experience as an agronomist with ongoing continuing education to maintain certifications.

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information) Base salary ranges from $35000.00 to $50,000.00 with varying incentive packages. Last year my incentive put me just short of the 6 figure range.

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING company truck, 4 weeks vacation(hard to find time to take it) long hours in April, May and June but work about 35 hours/ week rest of year and ski or drive for the ski team 6 night /week.

STLer645
02-13-2008, 04:00 AM
Noticed a few younger guys asking about marine industry jobs. Just thought I would post this Trade Only (http://www.tradeonlytoday.com).

Decent way of keeping up with what is going on in the industry and who's looking to hire...though it has little focus on tow boats or watersports.

03 35th Anniversary
02-13-2008, 05:17 AM
*What you guys do for a living Mechanical Installation Supervisor for a warehouse logistics company. In short we manufacture, sell and install conveyor systems to most all major retailers in U.S.

*What do you like about it Knowing that everybody in the country has something in their daily lives that has came across a conveyor system we have Manufactured and Installed. At 26 years old I have traveled more places and seen stuff than the average person.

*What your daily/weekly duties include Normal management duties, planing and directing.

*What do you dislike about it Lots of hours Lots of traveling/time away from home. We have a new Installation Manager (my boss man) which is a penny pincher who doesn't know how to manage the jobs with man power and isn't afaid to screw you out of a hundred when he can.

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc) Same as you would anywhere else. Work hard rember what you learn and show up to work everyday.

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information) Way too much to up and quit.... :(

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING

andrewtimko
02-13-2008, 07:47 AM
Wondering if any of you IT guys have any advice for me. I want to get into networking and I currently have Bachelors in Comp Sci, Comp Tia Security plus, MCSE, CCNA and should have my CCNP by the middle of March if all goes right. I just cant seen to make the jump from pc support over there (approx 4 years of offical experience)

Get your CCIE.

kdr
02-13-2008, 09:39 AM
I am an electrical engineer. Did college for 4 and a half years, with a co-op position at a local utility thrown in. Got a job with small consulting firm after graduation. I have gotten some great experience working in a small firm. There is a lot of interaction with the more seasoned engineers, so you pickup a lot. I passed both the EIT and the PE exams on the first try, and I attribute that to my post college experience. Pay started out mid forties, but I have gotten pretty good raises each year and there was a big jump when I got my PE license.
What I like about my job: Each day is different. As a consultant, we work on whatever comes in. One day I'll be in the office working on a study, then the next I'll be out in the field figuring out why a customer had a outage. My company also does electrical testing, which gets me out of the office every once in a while, plus I get a hands on feel how things actually work which helps tremendously when you sit down to do a design. I also like how flexible the schedules can be. If I need make a personnel errand during the day, it's a non issue so long as I get my time in for the week.

What I don't like: The pressure. There is a ton of pressure to get the jobs done on time and come in under budget. Usually, it's not that big of a deal except for when the company is accepting more work than it can handle. It is also a pain when you are neck deep in projects and your best customer calls with an emergency. Nothing quite like coming in on a Saturday or Sunday to catch up a little and everyone else is there too.

sizzler
02-13-2008, 11:20 AM
foreign-exchange money broker---screaming and shouting all day long at other brokers in a pit........

get in at 6:30am---leave at 5pm-ish.....take clients entertaining until the early hours of the morning...do this most days.....


money....loads-- but it takes a toll on your health,marriage,social life...lets you buy a nice boat tho';)


been doing it 22yrs and would love to get out....retire to a lake and do what comes naturally...

06' X-2 R8R H8R
02-13-2008, 12:58 PM
Real Estate appraiser here. Self employed and I make my own hours. I would not recomend to anybody to get into this line in the near future given the current market melt. Been doing it for about 8 Years and the money use to be real good now its ok. Keeps the Mastercraft in the garage and the wife happy. Schooling out here in Cal. is now a 4 year degree....It Use to be as of the first of this year only a few classes and some apprentiship under a licensed appraiser. Good luck....

Jorski
02-13-2008, 02:29 PM
Stockbroker:

Spent 10 years in sales (network equipment etc.) then went back to school and did an MBA. Got a job in a training program at a large firm.

Likes: I love investing and well, just about everthing about the stock and bond markets. The job offers a great deal of autonomy, you really have your own business within a business. There is basically no limit to how much money you can make, just depends upon how hard you are willing to work. You are also building an asset (your book of clients) that can be sold eventually in addition to earning significant income along the way.

Dislikes: It takes years to get over the hump, and make decent money. There can be considerable pressure and stress. Clients can be very difficult, no matter how much money you make for them...people can have a very strange relationship with their money. Your success in the business is highly dependant upon your ability to attract clients, and despite what you may think, making great returns for your clients does NOT guarantee referrals.

In the end there is a lot to be said for the business, you can make it almost anything that you want it to be; and that is a good thing. Just beware that you have to have clients to have a business, so you generally need to do something else first. A rich 50 year old is unlikely to give money to someone in their 20's, and at that age your friends don't have much money. Most successfull brokers enter the field in their 30's and already have a network of contacts that they bring to the table.

Good luck.

sdesmond
02-13-2008, 03:06 PM
I am an Associate Regional Meat Buyer for Whole Foods Markets in the Midwest Region.
There is great money where I work and you cant beat the benefits. Company payes my familys medical and all I pay is 15 a month for dental and vision. We are the 15th best company to work for on the fortune 500.

Plymouth Family Guy
02-13-2008, 04:22 PM
I am a CPA and spent eleven years in public accounting specializing in the tax area. I was with Arthur Andersen when that firm went down in flames, then spent two years at Deloitte. I worked a lot of hours while in public accounting but learned a lot and met a ton of great people. With all of the extra hours, my eleven years there were worth about fifteen years of experience. The pay was pretty good throughout my career in public accounting. I spent the last three and a half years as the Controller for real estate development company. My hours worked went way down and the pay went up. I currently am a Tax Director for a family office which is an office that takes care of the affairs of high net worth individuals. I got this job due to my "Big 4" CPA firm background and my contacts that I have nurtured through the years.

I enjoyed my time in public accounting. You get to see how businesses and people earn money (and how they spend it). It allowed me to figure out where I wanted to spend my career. As others on the board have said, obtaining an accounting degree is a great vehicle for your future. Around here, starting pay at many accounting firms is 40K - 50K from what I hear. That usually includes all benefits and three weeks vacation. Many firms let you bank overtime hours to use as vacation. Being a tax accountant in Minnesota is a pretty good deal. You work very hard from January 15 - April 15 and can take it easy and use your vacation in the summer, when you can spend time behind your Mastercraft!

michael freeman
02-13-2008, 11:05 PM
I create really expensive video games for the military as an Aerospace Engineer for these things:
http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n267/michaelfreeman_2006/042OverVirginia.jpg

Monte
02-13-2008, 11:10 PM
I create really expensive video games for the military as an Aerospace Engineer for these things:
http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n267/michaelfreeman_2006/042OverVirginia.jpg

Darn good lookin bird.........:cool:

ShawnE
02-14-2008, 12:02 AM
As part one of my career search, I would like to know:
*What you guys do for a living-Video production/animations for Fortune 300 insurance/mutual fund organization
*What do you like about it-get to play with blue smoke & mirrors...It's doesn't feel like a "real" job. The people running the joint are Very nice people!
*What your daily/weekly duties include-I get to "shoot" the CEO on a regular basis. corporate communications, streaming video, marketing video production.
*What do you dislike about it-Everybody wants to be a@#$#*@director.
*What did you have to do to get where you are now-I followed in daddies footsteps...I worked for many years in broadcast TV then made industrial training films for John Deere, Miller Brewing, Echo and the like.
*How much you make per year-it doesn't matter
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING-every spring they make me go to the sales incentive conferences and and film the top sales people
having fun....past years-Jamacia, St. Thomas, Cabo, Cancun...this May we go to Italy. I love my job!

Monte- lookin' for a move?

puck_11
02-14-2008, 12:33 AM
*What you guys do for a living: I am a Student Naval Aviator

*What do you like about it: Its the coolest job in the world!

*What your daily/weekly duties include: Learning to fly tactical jets, getting thoroughly debriefed on how you suck at it

*What do you dislike about it: its an emotional rollercoaster at times

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc): Get a degree then an officer commission through OCS

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information): Most of us can't believe we get paid to do what we do

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING: Perks of the job are obvious, time away from home is guaranteed, but everyone will tell you that they'd do again in a heartbeat and you will never regret it

daverbeck
02-14-2008, 12:47 AM
As part one of my career search, I would like to know:
*What you guys do for a living - Engineering Management at a multinational company.

*What do you like about it - Get to do some creative stuff. Pays well. Previously worked for small private companies which was much more rewarding. Being part of growing a small company and making it successful.

*What your daily/weekly duties include - I've had a number of positions and duties. I presently get involved in trying to promote global growth by introducing new technologies to our company. A young engineer typically gets assigned to specific projects and works for a project manager.

*What do you dislike about it - It can be frustrating working in a large company if you are used to a small company environment

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc) - I started by working in my field while in college. Worked in the shop part time and they hired me when I graduated. I took a few chances on some small companies that grew rapidly and had good relationships with the owners which paid off for me in the long run.

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information) - An engineer starts at $50K +, if you get into management you can make 2 to 3 times that eventually. If you get into business management (rather than Engineering like me) the sky is the limit (our chairman started as an engineer)

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING - The perks at a big company typically are financial. Non-management engineers are expected to work 45 to 50 hrs per week. 55 + is typical for management.

Monte
02-14-2008, 12:47 AM
*What you guys do for a living: I am a Student Naval Aviator

*What do you like about it: Its the coolest job in the world!

*What your daily/weekly duties include: Learning to fly tactical jets, getting thoroughly debriefed on how you suck at it

*What do you dislike about it: its an emotional rollercoaster at times

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc): Get a degree then an officer commission through OCS

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information): Most of us can't believe we get paid to do what we do

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING: Perks of the job are obvious, time away from home is guaranteed, but everyone will tell you that they'd do again in a heartbeat and you will never regret it


Nice job:cool:

Harvey
02-14-2008, 01:24 PM
I am an Associate Regional Meat Buyer for Whole Foods Markets in the Midwest Region.
There is great money where I work and you cant beat the benefits. Company payes my familys medical and all I pay is 15 a month for dental and vision. We are the 15th best company to work for on the fortune 500.

He!! of a company. I did a profile on them for a leadership course in undergrad. They impressed me more than any other company I have had experience with. Not sure if this is still true but the CEO is not allowed to draw more than 20 times the lowest paid full time employee. If he wants to make more he has to raise salaries across the board.

Bruce
02-14-2008, 04:44 PM
I am retired and damn good at it!

auburn buck
02-14-2008, 06:40 PM
I have a very unusual career/job, as a lobbyist, here in California:

*What do you like about it - getting to hang out with cool folks and play golf at fundraisers
*What your daily/weekly duties include - Show up every day at the Capitol.
*What do you dislike about it - Having to attend fundraisers
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc) - Worked in state government and the Legislature
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information) - more than I did in state government
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING -

Chief
02-14-2008, 07:36 PM
I am on my 3rd year as an accounting major at the University of South Florida. I am pretty good at accounting, and doing very well in classes. Only problem is, I can not see myself as being an accountant for the rest of my life. I started accounting because I felt it would be something good to know in the future as someday I plan on running my own business and being my own boss.

As part one of my career search, I would like to know:
*What you guys do for a living
*What do you like about it
*What your daily/weekly duties include
*What do you dislike about it
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING

Thanks guys!

Navy Chief
Making boys into men and junior officers into great officers
Drinking coffee and bit<hing
All the political crap

Don't make enough
Defending freedom and democracy is pretty cool.
Always gone!

92 190 PS
02-15-2008, 08:54 AM
Currently a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt with a large paper company, but have held many different jobs at the same company in the supply chain arena over the last 10 years. Company is currently owned by private equity which makes every day an adventure, but I'm learning a ton.

Ric
02-15-2008, 12:57 PM
I am going to level with you guys. I don't really run a church for loggers but it's a good cover story since I'm actually a male model.

I know it sounds gay, and actually most of the people I work with on a daily basis are gay. But it affords me a mastercraft, a nice home, travel and plenty of beautiful people as friends, coworkers (and enemies). It's fun.

There, I said it. and no, I am not gay, so stop PMing me!

Sodar
02-15-2008, 01:19 PM
I am going to level with you guys. I don't really run a church for loggers but it's a good cover story since I'm actually a male model.

I know it sounds gay, and actually most of the people I work with on a daily basis are gay. But it affords me a mastercraft, a nice home, travel and plenty of beautiful people as friends, coworkers (and enemies). It's fun.

There, I said it. and no, I am not gay, so stop PMing me!

Ah, Yes! Rachel the model! I have seen pics of you! You are HOT! :cool:

Ric
02-15-2008, 01:26 PM
Ah, Yes! Rachel the model! I have seen pics of you! You are HOT! :cool: Easy Tiger, I just said I was not gay and I mean it.

Sodar
02-15-2008, 01:33 PM
Easy Tiger, I just said I was not gay and I mean it.

I am very happy you are not gay! You are a chick, right????

Do you have any modeling photos?

Upper Michigan Prostar190
02-15-2008, 02:51 PM
what an interesting thread this has become.

BrandonKTM
02-15-2008, 03:05 PM
A buddy of mine used to do Real estate leasing. He quit that and became the CC dealer in Lake Norman. I told him "Never make work out of your hobby" Well, it killed his skiing, going to the lake was not as much fun, long hours with less reward $'s. Finally, he bailed a couple of years ago. Back to Real Estate and doing well and likes the lake again. I also read on this forum somewhere that his dealership he sold no longer does CC. Who knows what happened there.

bcampbe7
02-15-2008, 03:20 PM
As part one of my career search, I would like to know:
*What you guys do for a living - As my profile states "........." See that little "." on your keyboard? I created it. You can thank me for the ability to end your sentences.

*What do you like about it - Coming up with "........." was a lifelong struggle. I finally split with my business partner in the early 70's as he wanted to use the "|".

*What your daily/weekly duties include - I retired shortly after the ".'s" creation and enjoy spending my time as a street pharmacist.

*What do you dislike about it - It just a "."

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc) - A thorough understanding of geometry and aesthetics.

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information) - Well over $5.65 per hour, probably upwards of $6.87 per hour really.

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING - Being known as "that" guy is the greatest perk of all. Also knowing that after all these years, most people are still using my product. <----There she is again

TMCNo1
02-15-2008, 03:26 PM
Currently a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt with a large paper company, but have held many different jobs at the same company in the supply chain arena over the last 10 years. Company is currently owned by private equity which makes every day an adventure, but I'm learning a ton.


You don't work for these guys do you?
31559

Ric
02-15-2008, 03:45 PM
I am very happy you are not gay! You are a chick, right????

Do you have any modeling photos? I thought I already said I'm a not-gay male model.

Sodar
02-15-2008, 03:54 PM
I thought I already said I'm a not-gay male model.

I thought it was a typo.

I read it in black and white, here (http://media.nasaexplores.com/lessons/03-035/images/brs_parachute.jpg)... that you are a chick. :confused:

Ric
02-15-2008, 04:04 PM
I thought it was a typo.

I read it in black and white, here (http://media.nasaexplores.com/lessons/03-035/images/brs_parachute.jpg)... that you are a chick. :confused:
Nah, but that is why I decided to set the record straight here that I am not gay nor female.

http://media.nasaexplores.com/lessons/03-035/images/brs_parachute.jpg

Upper Michigan Prostar190
02-15-2008, 04:28 PM
A buddy of mine used to do Real estate leasing. He quit that and became the CC dealer in Lake Norman. I told him "Never make work out of your hobby" Well, it killed his skiing, going to the lake was not as much fun, long hours with less reward $'s. Finally, he bailed a couple of years ago. Back to Real Estate and doing well and likes the lake again. I also read on this forum somewhere that his dealership he sold no longer does CC. Who knows what happened there.
Smart words. there is work, and there is play. there is a reason they call it work. People are so dumb. they think rockstars and movie stars have it all made just cuz they make money and are famous. Ever see the itinerary for a professional musician on tour? its way the hell more hours than we put in a work day. sleep on the tour bus through the night....get up late morning, eat breakfast, go do some radio interview to promo the concert taht night in the current city, then go to a meet and greet promo thing, sign 700 autographs.... then go to the hotel, meet some managers, record execs, and corporate putz to discuss your new CD, call your lawyer, and accountant to sort out issues with them. try to find time to call your family. try to find time to sit down and write songs, go to the venue for sound check, do sound check and rehearse. work with the band over some new material at sound check. head back to hotel to get a nap and eat lunch. come back to venue and schmooze with fan club people, radio people, TV people, VIPs, get to the dressing room, get ready, then do the show, take a shower and eat dinner, hang with the after show crowd while roadies pack up. get on the buss and repeat. Read some books on teh real world of music.......its business, and hard work. lots of hard work.

mccobmd
02-15-2008, 05:16 PM
*What you guys do for a living- I'm a physician
*What do you like about it- every day I feel like I've helped someone
*What your daily/weekly duties include- work about 55 hours per week, when I was my own boss I worked 85 hour per week
*What do you dislike about it- on call every third night and weekend sometimes makes lake time challenging
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)- 4 years undergrad, 4 years medical school, 4 years residency
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)- enough to pay cash for my boat
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING- I was my own boss for 3 years, the advantage is you set the hours, the disadvantage is everytime I wanted to take off it cost me 14000 per week in overhead with no income, everything is a tradeoff

bbymgr
02-18-2008, 01:54 AM
I'm a Senior Account Manager for Philip Morris. Ya....I know.. I've heard it all before about working for "Big Tobacco". Once your in, you can't afford to leave. The Pay & Benefits are to incredible. They have been rated the #1 Benefit Company in Money Magazine for 7 years running. As for pay..I don't use my Mechanicle Engineering form Purdue cause that would be a drastic pay cut.

Muttley
02-18-2008, 12:00 PM
-Self employed Signwriter and Pinstriper, Vehicle Cleanup and Detailing.
-I do everything including the bookkeeping and no 2 days are alike and that's a good thing.
-Self taught, after being a Draftsman for 13 years.
-More than doubled my income as a Draftsman.

Wow. Another one. Except for the vehicle detailing.

Was a self employed signmaker for 20 years. As a subcontracting service I did drafting, permits and design. Started with an awning and tent company as their total Drafting/Design/Permit/Sign manager. Now I'm running the place.

I like it because it's creative, hands on. I get to do some cool stuff for the movies (tents for X-Men, "Dr. Ray's Electronics" for a looting scene in the upcoming "Day The Earth Stood Still" with Keanu Reeves, Fantastic Four, Catwoman... Lots of Stargate stuff, and X-Files when it was done here). I get the challenge of handling really large projects like shopping malls and a five star tent resort.

I like the people I work with. I like the respect. I admit, I like being the "Go To" guy.

Don't like? The odd crappy customer. Architects who design stuff that defies basic physics (sorry, dude, but yes, trhe fabric needs a spport system), dealing with 10 different municipalities with different and ridiculous permit requirements (TWO engineers, one to check the others work??) and whiny employees. All of that is just part of the challenge I guess.

Workin' 4 Toys
02-19-2008, 11:22 PM
*What you guys do for a living= Septic tank cleaner
*What do you like about it= Not much
*What your daily/weekly duties include= Cleaning out some $#!t
*What do you dislike about it= If you can get past the smell, the $#!t ain't bad
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)= Had to look at alot of $#!t
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)= No where near enough
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING= It's kind of a $#!tty job unless you don't mind getting p!$$ed on everyday.

barefoot
02-20-2008, 05:08 PM
I own a retail coffee company. We just celebrated our 4th year anniversary this month.

Likes...I make my customers happy everyday. I serve an amazing product, have an amazing staff, and keep people well caffeinated throughout the day.

My duties include, ummm, everything. Financials, menu development, pricing, marketing, ordering, business development, hiring, training...you get the picture.

Dislikes...I'm located two blocks away from UW-Milwaukee. We serve a big student population. When summer, winer break, spring break, and all major holidays hit, we're not busy. Still have the fixed costs to cover. It takes planning to get through the slow times.

It took a lot of sacrifices to get to where I am. Any self employed person will tell you that. The good part is that the business is stable and making money so much so that my vacation time keeps increasing every year. 3 weeks off so far this year to visit New Zealand and a ski trip planned next month. I make enough money to put a smile on my face. It's important to note that I chose this business because it was something I was passionate about. The money will come eventually...that's the true test of the business plan.

KevenAtWakeUSF
02-20-2008, 11:26 PM
Awesome responses guys! Of all the forums I posted this on, I have about 6 more pages of responses here then the next leader. I think I will begin my career as an accountant.

Workin' 4 Toys
02-21-2008, 12:18 AM
I don't really clean septic tanks. :o Although at work I do get $#!t on alot.:rolleyes:


I model sunglasses and as side work I am a crankshaft straightener.

whitedog
02-21-2008, 12:28 AM
I do have a customer who cleans septic tanks. (Part time farmer) Has two trucks and nets around $150,000.00/year after taxes and expences. With all the rural building its steady work but he takes about 6 weeks off in the winter except for emergency calls. Biggest problem for him is having people complain about his tandom trucks on their blacktop driveways. His oldest daughter operates the second truck, unusual carreer for a gal but she also operates a crawler and turnpole. No picts but she does look good in a tank top and shorts.:cool:

kal_dude
02-21-2008, 03:38 PM
i run an internet marketing and product brokerage company from my home, and teach people how to earn a 6 digit residual income working from home part time! i love the fact that i can help other people get whatever they want out of life!

kal
www.kaldude.unfranchise.com
414-801-0297

tommcat
02-21-2008, 04:48 PM
I'm a Ford master tech and i hate my job.

bran7869
02-21-2008, 05:17 PM
I'm a mechanical engineer for GE Aviation and love it!

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o115/bran7869/CIMG0040.jpg

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o115/bran7869/CIMG0039.jpg

chudson
02-21-2008, 05:19 PM
As part one of my career search, I would like to know:
1. What you guys do for a living-----Farmer: corn and soybeans in east central Illinois

2. What do you like about it-----The fact that I am my own boss from when and what to plant to harvest and marketing. And by the way I Love what I do, I cannot imagine doing anything else and enjoying it as much as I do Farming!!!

3. What your daily/weekly duties include-----some of these are all year long duties, marketing of grain, planning what gets planted, along with my agronimist is figuring fertilizer and insecticide needs, harvesting, and maintainance on machinery.

4. What do you dislike about it-----the fact that if Oprah deciedes to take meat out of her diet and makes that announcement on television the next day meat and corn markets can go down limit the next few days. If it rains in south Africa corn prices go down but on the other hand when the Mississippi floods millions of acres of corn prices go up so the downfall of fellow farmers on the other side of the state help me where the floods did not effect and that is a hard pill to swallow. In other words ther are things completly out of my hands that have a huge roll in my income.

5. What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)-----born into it, I am the 5th generation on my farm. 2 years college and worked in the Agronomy Dept. at the Uof I for several years.

6. How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)-----That can change from a little to alot every year. 3 years ago today corn price was $1.93/bu.cash at the elevator and beans were $5.71/bu. Today corn is $5.04 cash and the CBOT has corn up $.03 as of right now and beans are $13.50 cash up $.08 at the CBOT "big difference" in 3 years. I along with everyone else though are waiting fo the bottom to drop out as soon as ethanol goes the wayside.

7. Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING-----If I get a chance I'll post my part time job which deals directly with this question. Good Luck!!!
31745

edit: And whitedog I have a good friend that's a plumber and his credo will fit on the side of your farmer customers septic truck.
" Your sh-t is my Bread and Butter" course you've probably heard that one before!!!

pilot02
02-21-2008, 05:20 PM
I'm a state employee.... Classification and compensation consultant for 111 state agencies and currrently contemplating a career change and/or job change.
Bachelor's in Mgt, Master's in Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Came to work here to develop psychological pre-employment exams and the unit was disbanded after I started due to budget cuts. Worked in Retail Management (Walmart) and Restaurant Mgt prior to that. Liked the interaction with people at WM and the fast pace. Actually miss it some days. Don't miss the hours though!

kal_dude
02-22-2008, 01:01 AM
hey chudson, how far from morrison,IL are you???

kal

chudson
02-22-2008, 10:07 AM
hey chudson, how far from morrison,IL are you???

kal

About 160 mi. s.e. of Morrison in Urbana.

Jerseydave
02-22-2008, 10:53 AM
chudson, refreshing to hear from a farmer that loves his job! Nice Deere combine too! :)
I was raised on a small farm in NJ (160 acres) which is tiny compared to other farms, but my father and grandfather worked really hard to make a living and provide for our family. Unfortunately, I realized you cannot make a decent living these days farming on a small farm, so I'm the first generation of my family that doesn't follow that tradition.

However, my career is somewhat related. Beef, poultry, pork and cheese all come from farmers and I'm the one who distributes those products. I am a Dietz & Watson food distributor with my own route. I supply deli meat & cheese to mom & pop delis, sub shops, pizza shops, etc. I solicite new accounts, set-up deli cases, deliver product and overall help my customers become more sucessful. I work (4) days a week with friday, sat. and sundays off. (fridays on the boat whenever possible) The long weekends make up for the fact that I take no vacation during the year and I wake up @ 3:00 am 3 times a week.

4 years ago I was a MAC TOOLS distributor for 13 years. Again, my own business which was great for about 8 years until I got tired of chasing guys for money and realized many of my customers had absolutely no respect for me or what I do. It was like I was the last person they wanted to see, so I made the switch to deli meats and I'm glad about it!

Money, as with any business is you get out of it what you put into it. I'm very happy with what I make, I'm my own boss and I don't have any employees to contend with. (not yet anyway) My wife is able to stay home with the kids, which is something we both wanted. She's a dental hygenist by trade, and someday she'll go back to work but for now things are great.

TMCNo1
02-22-2008, 11:06 AM
chudson, refreshing to hear from a farmer that loves his job! Nice Deere combine too! :)
I was raised on a small farm in NJ (160 acres) which is tiny compared to other farms, but my father and grandfather worked really hard to make a living and provide for our family. Unfortunately, I realized you cannot make a decent living these days farming on a small farm, so I'm the first generation of my family that doesn't follow that tradition.

However, my career is somewhat related. Beef, poultry, pork and cheese all come from farmers and I'm the one who distributes those products. I am a Dietz & Watson food distributor with my own route. I supply deli meat & cheese to mom & pop delis, sub shops, pizza shops, etc. I solicite new accounts, set-up deli cases, deliver product and overall help my customers become more sucessful. I work (4) days a week with friday, sat. and sundays off. (fridays on the boat whenever possible) The long weekends make up for the fact that I take no vacation during the year and I wake up @ 3:00 am 3 times a week.

4 years ago I was a MAC TOOLS distributor for 13 years. Again, my own business which was great for about 8 years until I got tired of chasing guys for money and realized many of my customers had absolutely no respect for me or what I do. It was like I was the last person they wanted to see, so I made the switch to deli meats and I'm glad about it!

Money, as with any business is you get out of it what you put into it. I'm very happy with what I make, I'm my own boss and I don't have any employees to contend with. (not yet anyway) My wife is able to stay home with the kids, which is something we both wanted. She's a dental hygenist by trade, and someday she'll go back to work but for now things are great.


You need to fill that truck up, hook up the boat and come to CSM '08!
You could convoy with Doug G!
http://www.gottadeal.com/forums/images/smilies/new/gdbacktopic.gif

funk
02-22-2008, 11:30 AM
I'm a Quality Engineer for AMP Research. We design, patent, and produce OEM automotive accessories such as bed xtenders, powersteps, fuel doors, bedsteps. Duties would include overall quality of products, setting up inspection plans, monitoring suppliers(all within 50 miles), and dealing with customer complaints. Very innovative company with innovative employees. I have an associates degree but most of my qualifications would come from ASQ certifications and/or college certificate programs, accompanied by 11 years of job experience. I'm very happy working around trucks all day and coming up with convenient ideas! check us out at www.amp-research.com.

peason
02-22-2008, 12:22 PM
*What you guys do for a living - Outside Sales Rep. for a regional Chemical Distributor/Manufacturer
*What do you like about it - Interaction with customers. Diversity of business I call on. Running my own territory -like it's my own business, but with a large investor on my side.
*What your daily/weekly duties include - Securing new business and maintaining current business. Sales calls and unfortunately paperwork.
*What do you dislike about it - Normal frustrations of dealing with internal and external customers. Nothing too bad - but it's easy to *****.
*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc) I have a degree in Agricultural Business from Iowa State - intially worked for Excel Meat - division of Cargill after graduating, went into retail business with father-in-law which didn't work out after 6-7 years. Went to work for very large International Chemical Distributor - transferred to large metropolitan area and left to work for my current employer. I have been in the work force for 20 years now and all I have ever done is associated with sales- either in direct sales or sales management.
*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information) Enough to raise my kids and enjoy owning a MC. I am very fortunate.
*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING - Perks-work for a company that values their employees, drive a nice company car and have a good compensation. Another plus is most travel is done during the day - so very few overnights. Vacation time is 3 weeks a year for now.

Lake_Tippy_Skier
02-22-2008, 01:36 PM
*What you guys do for a living: I am Design Engineer for a pontoon boat manufacturer

*What do you like about it: It centers around my passion - Boating

*What your daily/weekly duties include: Designing new models, testing new concepts/shapes, writing BOM's,

*What do you dislike about it: The boating market is currently down

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc): Got a degree then found an ad in the paper.

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information): Just enough to balance out my wifes spending

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING: Testing boats is always a perk. Catalog Photo shoots are pretty fun too.

Jerseydave
02-23-2008, 02:03 PM
You need to fill that truck up, hook up the boat and come to CSM '08!
You could convoy with Doug G!


http://www.gottadeal.com/forums/images/smilies/new/gdbacktopic.gif


I know you guys can eat, but 6000 lbs. of hot dogs, burgers and deli meats might be a bit too much! :)

Chief
02-23-2008, 04:48 PM
I am going to level with you guys. I don't really run a church for loggers but it's a good cover story since I'm actually a male model.

I know it sounds gay, and actually most of the people I work with on a daily basis are gay. But it affords me a mastercraft, a nice home, travel and plenty of beautiful people as friends, coworkers (and enemies). It's fun.

There, I said it. and no, I am not gay, so stop PMing me!

I saw your movie "Zoolander". Show us the "Blue Steel" pose. :D

Monte
04-04-2008, 12:35 AM
Civil Engineer
I started my Company 9/9/99 I was sick of working for someone
(I don’t take orders well)

Now I have 16 employees, and I Love my job, Hate MY Boss……… :rolleyes: LOL working for your self is the only way to go IMO, it give me the freedom to spend with my kids
Yes you do need to make payroll every 2 weeks, but if you work hard treat your employees well ……… it all falls into place

My Daily Duties Hummm I get up at 5 am get to the office about 6am or so? Review the jobs we are working on I have 12 to 16 conference calls a week, QC and red line jobs before they go out to the field, bid on new jobs coming in, look at timelines, review billing, drive out new jobs, and I finish about 12 noon

What do I make a year………… well my wife 8p reads TT and she would find out so…….No


You forgot.............. hi deer8p :D

2RLAKE
04-04-2008, 08:43 AM
I, like Bran7869, work at GE Aviation and love it ... followed my dad footsteps as he worked here for 39 years. I got my BSME from U of Cincinnati and have been here my entire career. Jobs are what you put into them. I've done well, but its due to hard work, taking stretch asignments and never sitting back waiting for someone to hand me a promition ... go earn it yourself. My advice for you is to get a job and get into a financial leadership training program if you can ... never stop learning ... if you stop you get passed. You have to love what you do as others have said ... I love my job. As a Cincinnati kid I've been all over the globe ... Australia to Tibet, all over Europe, Kuwait and all through Latin America ... I think the count is near 40 countries. I wouldn't trade my job or think of leaving for anything.

I do have a HUGE challenge at work ... our leader is a big waterskier ... but he owns a CC ... still trying to convert him to MC!

coz
04-04-2008, 11:03 AM
I'm a Contractor with 2 classifications: B-1 General Contractor & C-6 Cabinets & Millwork. I prefer high end residential but I'll take on anything. :D

clevan
04-04-2008, 12:10 PM
I am a CPA in public accounting. The great thing about this profession right now is the demand is huge. Get your degree, get a job with the largest public firm you can for three years, get your license and you can pick from alot of options. CPA's in public practice can specialize in valuation/appraisal, litigation support, forensic accounting, fraud investigation, financial planning advising, and of course tax and audit work. Also government agencies like the FBI and CIA also recruit accounting graduates. Or you can go into just about any industry you want. Many CPA's move into positions covering operations as well as finance and accounting. Because of the demand many public firms are open to more flexible employment arrangements. I personally only work when my twleve year old son is in school, about a thousand hours a year. While everyone else is at work paying for their boat I am at the lake with my son using mine. Pay is a function of how much responsibility and how many hours you put in. In this part of the country, starting pay is $40k and up, managers for a large local firm expect $100k and up, partners up from there.

wakeX2wake
04-04-2008, 12:20 PM
I'm an Industrial Engineer for the world's 3rd largest aluminum and can stock manfacturer

I like the fact that i'm single 25 and can own an extremely nice MC and a really nice new truck a house and still play and do what and when i want... and i get a paid holiday for my birthday any day i want to take it in the month of my birthday... i analyze the way my company spends money to make sure we're doing things the best way we can for as cheap as possible and i balance inputs to outputs which is a huge task considering we make between 85-105 million pounds of aluminum each month and ship it around the world... next yr i will have three weeks of vacation i think

i don't like the fact that so many things are out of my hands... purchasing and capital and expense accounts... it's frustrating having to wait on others to do their part so i can do mine when i know that i could usually do it faster and i would be privy to more info than they let me... my job is good to me so i try to be as smart as possible

bbeach
04-04-2008, 12:21 PM
*What you guys do for a living
Senior Web Designer for a major outdoor retailer

*What do you like about it
Being creative everyday!

*What your daily/weekly duties include

*What do you dislike about it
My boss has a tendency to micromanage and he wears Mickey Mouse shirts

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)
BS Degree in MIS, Internship as a web designer for ad firm, years of web design job experience

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)
Not enough, but enough to be happy!

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING
Living 30 minutes from a gorgeous lake in beautiful SW Mo, incredible discount on Outdoor Gear!

Naste Craft
04-04-2008, 03:21 PM
*What you guys do for a living
Inside sales for a global distributer of electronic wire and cable
Anixter.com

*What do you like about it
The competitiveness.

*What your daily/weekly duties include
Quoting, placing orders, following up....vendor meetings(free lunch);)

*What do you dislike about it
Don't get to meet many of my customers

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)
Worked for a contractor for SoCal Edison for 5 years. As a drafter and test tech, and some pole-line hardware work

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)
More then my old job....:D

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING

1.2 miles from home....:D
Salary non-exempted (I get paid for overtime)
Tons of room to grow
Trips awarded to top salesmen
We are Global so I can relocate if need be

peason
04-04-2008, 03:50 PM
*What you guys do for a living
Senior Web Designer for a major outdoor retailer

*What do you like about it
Being creative everyday!

*What your daily/weekly duties include

*What do you dislike about it
My boss has a tendency to micromanage and he wears Mickey Mouse shirts

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc)
BS Degree in MIS, Internship as a web designer for ad firm, years of web design job experience

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information)
Not enough, but enough to be happy!

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING
Living 30 minutes from a gorgeous lake in beautiful SW Mo, incredible discount on Outdoor Gear!

Must be PRO BASS - I love going into that store!

bbeach
04-04-2008, 04:29 PM
Brilliant deduction!

ttu
04-04-2008, 04:30 PM
beach,

do they sell anchor's:rolleyes:

atlfootr
08-25-2008, 11:30 PM
labor and design has all gone abroad to places like Italy, China and most recently Mexico.
As if, that should shock any of us ... "Job Out Source"

PapaJoe
08-25-2008, 11:41 PM
I did not have much to do, So --- I wrote down my life story :)


I am in the U.S. Army (Active Duty)... I have been in the United States Army my entire adult life. I enlisted in the Army (Active Duty) after graduating from high school in the summer of 1988. I enlisted to become a 76C10, Equipment Records and Parts Specialist. I attended basic training at Fort Leonardwood, MO, and Advanced Individual Training (AIT) at Fort Lee, VA. After completing my initial training, I was assigned to the 710th Main Support Battalion, 10th Mountain Division, at Fort Drum, New York. During my enlisted time, I completed Airborne Training at Fort Benning, GA, Air Assault Training at Fort Drum, Jungle Operations Training at Fort Sherman, Panama, and I was selected as the DISCOM soldier of the quarter, 2nd Quarter, FY, 1990. After 3 years of active duty, I was honorably discharged from the Army, and I returned home to Texas.

After arriving back home in Texas, I enrolled into the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) in the fall of 1991. There, I also en-rolled into the University’s Army ROTC Program, and re-enlisted into the Texas Army National Guard under the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP). I changed my military occupation skill (MOS) to 11B10 and was assigned to Alpha Company, 3/144th Infantry Battalion (MECH). My senior year at UTA I was selected as the George C. Marshall Award recipient. Additionally, I am a distinguished military graduate from UTA’s ROTC program. I graduated from the University of Texas at Arlington in the spring of 1996 with a Bachelors of Arts degree in Public Relations. I was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Ordnance Corps, branch detailed to the Infantry.

After graduation from college, I attended Infantry Officer’s Basic Course (IOBC), and Ranger School at Fort Benning, GA. I was then assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, at Fort Bragg, NC in June of 1997. There I served as a rifle platoon leader and anti-armor platoon leader. After competition of my platoon leader time, I attended the Ordnance Officer Branch Qualification Course at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD, and returned to Fort Bragg in November 1998. I was then assigned to the 407th Forward Support Battalion where I served as the Direct Support Maintenance Shop Officer and Battalion Operations Officer (S-3). While assigned with the 82nd Airborne Division, I graduated from the Advanced Airborne School (Jumpmaster).

I left Fort Bragg in June of 2001 to attend the Combined Logistics Captains Career Course (CLC3) at Fort Lee, VA, and the Combined Arms Services and Staff School (CAS3) at Fort Leavenworth, KS. My next assignment was with the 302nd Forward Support Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, at Camp Casey, Republic of Korea. There I served as the Support Operations Maintenance Officer (MATO) for 14 months.

Upon my return to the United States, I was assigned to the 1st Cavalry Division in June of 2003. I was immediately selected to take company command. In August 2003, I assumed command of HSC, 615th Aviation Support Battalion. I deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom II with the First Cavalry Division in March of 2004. I returned home from Iraq in March 2005, and relinquished command in June 2005. I was awarded the Bronze Star for meritorious service while assigned as a company commander during OIF II.

My next assignment was as the S-4 Logistics Officer (S-4) for the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. I deployed with the Air Cavalry Brigade as part of Joint Task Force (JTF) Katrina to New Orleans, LA in September 2005. Our mission was to assist in providing relief efforts after Hurricane Katrina. One week after my return from New Orleans, I deployed again with the 1st Cavalry Division’s Aviation Task Force, as part of JTF Rita. The task Force deployed to Conroe, Texas to assist in relief efforts after Hurricane Rita. I was promoted to the rank of Major in April 2006.

I was then assigned to HHC, 1st Cavalry Division where I was assigned as the Division Maintenance Officer. I worked as a member of the Division’s staff in the G-4 section. I deployed to Iraq for my second time in October 2006. I returned home in December 2007 from almost a 15th month deployment in Iraq. I remained in the same duty position until May 2008. I then PCS’d (permanent change of duty station) to Fort Leavenworth, KS in June 2008.

While here, I will be a student at the U.S. Army Command General and Staff College. I will be attending the Intermediate Level Education (ILE) course for the next 10 months. Additionally, I will be working on my Master’s Degree. After one year of school at Fort Leavenworth, I will PCS again. I am not sure where, but I am asking for an assignment in Italy with the 173rd Airborne Brigade.

mlay
08-25-2008, 11:53 PM
Great read, I commend you for your service and recall my time in Vicenza Italy with the 3/325th ABCT from '88 to '91.

I am in the process of planning a return trip to the old stomping ground. PM me if you get assigned we might just bump into each other.

I did not have much to do, So --- I wrote down my life story :)


I am in the U.S. Army (Active Duty)... I have been in the United States Army my entire adult life. I enlisted in the Army (Active Duty) after graduating from high school in the summer of 1988. I enlisted to become a 76C10, Equipment Records and Parts Specialist. I attended basic training at Fort Leonardwood, MO, and Advanced Individual Training (AIT) at Fort Lee, VA. After completing my initial training, I was assigned to the 710th Main Support Battalion, 10th Mountain Division, at Fort Drum, New York. During my enlisted time, I completed Airborne Training at Fort Benning, GA, Air Assault Training at Fort Drum, Jungle Operations Training at Fort Sherman, Panama, and I was selected as the DISCOM soldier of the quarter, 2nd Quarter, FY, 1990. After 3 years of active duty, I was honorably discharged from the Army, and I returned home to Texas.

After arriving back home in Texas, I enrolled into the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) in the fall of 1991. There, I also en-rolled into the University’s Army ROTC Program, and re-enlisted into the Texas Army National Guard under the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP). I changed my military occupation skill (MOS) to 11B10 and was assigned to Alpha Company, 3/144th Infantry Battalion (MECH). My senior year at UTA I was selected as the George C. Marshall Award recipient. Additionally, I am a distinguished military graduate from UTA’s ROTC program. I graduated from the University of Texas at Arlington in the spring of 1996 with a Bachelors of Arts degree in Public Relations. I was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Ordnance Corps, branch detailed to the Infantry.

After graduation from college, I attended Infantry Officer’s Basic Course (IOBC), and Ranger School at Fort Benning, GA. I was then assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, at Fort Bragg, NC in June of 1997. There I served as a rifle platoon leader and anti-armor platoon leader. After competition of my platoon leader time, I attended the Ordnance Officer Branch Qualification Course at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD, and returned to Fort Bragg in November 1998. I was then assigned to the 407th Forward Support Battalion where I served as the Direct Support Maintenance Shop Officer and Battalion Operations Officer (S-3). While assigned with the 82nd Airborne Division, I graduated from the Advanced Airborne School (Jumpmaster).

I left Fort Bragg in June of 2001 to attend the Combined Logistics Captains Career Course (CLC3) at Fort Lee, VA, and the Combined Arms Services and Staff School (CAS3) at Fort Leavenworth, KS. My next assignment was with the 302nd Forward Support Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, at Camp Casey, Republic of Korea. There I served as the Support Operations Maintenance Officer (MATO) for 14 months.

Upon my return to the United States, I was assigned to the 1st Cavalry Division in June of 2003. I was immediately selected to take company command. In August 2003, I assumed command of HSC, 615th Aviation Support Battalion. I deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom II with the First Cavalry Division in March of 2004. I returned home from Iraq in March 2005, and relinquished command in June 2005. I was awarded the Bronze Star for meritorious service while assigned as a company commander during OIF II.

My next assignment was as the S-4 Logistics Officer (S-4) for the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. I deployed with the Air Cavalry Brigade as part of Joint Task Force (JTF) Katrina to New Orleans, LA in September 2005. Our mission was to assist in providing relief efforts after Hurricane Katrina. One week after my return from New Orleans, I deployed again with the 1st Cavalry Division’s Aviation Task Force, as part of JTF Rita. The task Force deployed to Conroe, Texas to assist in relief efforts after Hurricane Rita. I was promoted to the rank of Major in April 2006.

I was then assigned to HHC, 1st Cavalry Division where I was assigned as the Division Maintenance Officer. I worked as a member of the Division’s staff in the G-4 section. I deployed to Iraq for my second time in October 2006. I returned home in December 2007 from almost a 15th month deployment in Iraq. I remained in the same duty position until May 2008. I then PCS’d (permanent change of duty station) to Fort Leavenworth, KS in June 2008.

While here, I will be a student at the U.S. Army Command General and Staff College. I will be attending the Intermediate Level Education (ILE) course for the next 10 months. Additionally, I will be working on my Master’s Degree. After one year of school at Fort Leavenworth, I will PCS again. I am not sure where, but I am asking for an assignment in Italy with the 173rd Airborne Brigade.

mlay
08-25-2008, 11:59 PM
And if its still there I can recommend the best pizzera you could ever visit.

CBergerson
08-26-2008, 08:32 AM
I'm an Industrial Engineer for the world's 3rd largest aluminum and can stock manfacturer

I like the fact that i'm single 25 and can own an extremely nice MC and a really nice new truck a house and still play and do what and when i want... and i get a paid holiday for my birthday any day i want to take it in the month of my birthday... i analyze the way my company spends money to make sure we're doing things the best way we can for as cheap as possible and i balance inputs to outputs which is a huge task considering we make between 85-105 million pounds of aluminum each month and ship it around the world... next yr i will have three weeks of vacation i think

i don't like the fact that so many things are out of my hands... purchasing and capital and expense accounts... it's frustrating having to wait on others to do their part so i can do mine when i know that i could usually do it faster and i would be privy to more info than they let me... my job is good to me so i try to be as smart as possible

I would have guessed that you are an English professor. :rolleyes:

Roonie's
08-26-2008, 10:10 AM
*What you guys do for a living;
I went to college and got my BA and then went back to college for my pre-med undergrad. Then I also went through a Masters program all the while working construction remodel crews on the side. I decided I could make more money in real estate so I started that instead of going with my education and Masters. I have been buying homes and flipping them for almost 10 years. I have gone from a one person crew to many and from being slightly profitable to extremelly. Started out doing small flips and worked up to many flips going at once and in the high dollar ranges. However since the market downturn I have been taking a break and disolved everything for the past two years and helped my brother start two exciting companies. Currently in negotiations this week of a buyout of one of those companies from a household name.

*What do you like about it;
I loved the thrill of seeing something transform from ugly to extremelly elegant. Also liked being good at what I did and I had a long list of people that loved my work so much they would buy it before I had even started. I currently like starting new companies as it is hard but exciting. Requires a lot of hard work and time commitment!

*What your daily/weekly duties include;
At first it was very basic looking for properties then bidding on them getting financing in place and managing the money. Buying materials and figuring out the scope of the work to be done and then getting it done in a timely manner. Then I took on a more manager role juggling everything and being the bank. Now I am more a consultant so to speak.

*What do you dislike about it;
As the projects got bigger the more I was away from the actual work being done and I really liked to be the quality control on site. If it wasn't done right I would make them re-do it sometimes 5 times until it was done right regardless of cost. The buck always stopped with me so making money was my responsibility as I had to pay the crew, subs, etc.

*What did you have to do to get where you are now (internships, schooling, previous jobs, etc);
On the job experience. During highschool summers I worked construction growing up to earn money. After college I started on a small crew run by my cousin doing complete custom high dollar house re-builds where I learned a lot doing everything from foundation work to finish work.

*How much you make per year (if you would like to give up that information);
Can't complain and own an MC outright.

*Any other info you could give me. Perks of the job, vacation time, time away from home/family, ANYTHING;
The hardest part of owning and running your own business is the amount of time it involves. It really is time consuming and requires a lot of time and money. Even with my recent projects and new companies they are still very time consuming as the bigger they get the more time you need to invest in it. Also when starting out it can be vey stressful. I am sure I shortened my life some as the stress I incurred during the first years as all I saw was a lot of money out and would hold my breath hoping the money would return (it always did). I also had to put my neck on the line several times on some projects where if they failed I would have had to go bankrupt and that was a scary proposition as I am married and kids. I was fortunate to have a pulse on the market and got out before I lost anything and move onto something different.

austin ski bum
08-26-2008, 01:09 PM
Commercial Loan Officer in Texas with a private bank.

Bad: Pay is low until you build up your portfolio and prove your worth. Deal with a lot of people who think they're better than the next guy and that everything they bring in will make them millions. Have to deal with collecting past due payments all the time. Tons of competition.

Good: 40 hour weeks or less. No weekends. You get all of the Federal holidays off. Take customers out for golf or ski meetings on the lake. You do get to mingle with the big shots and make tons of connections.

Jimmauburn
08-26-2008, 03:29 PM
Network Engineer/IT Director for Peterbilt truck dealer. We have 10 stores and close to 175 computers and a very large Wide Area Network that I designed and maintain. No two days are the same at the office and I do get to network and meet new people and travel a pretty good bit since our dealerships are in 4 different states. Guess the good with the bad... Pay is okay and don't have to work alot of overtime, but there are times when I do have to work many many extra hours but the company I work for allows me extra time off so it all works out in the wash !!! Always learning and you have to keep on the leading edge of technology so it keeps getting better and bigger daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly !!!!!

wsrobert
08-26-2008, 06:43 PM
*Project Engineer (Mechanical Engr Degree) for Chemical Plant
*I work 4 days a week and the pay is awesome
*I do have alot of headaches dealing with contractors and trying design projects that are completely safe and always work without ever failing (a completely impossible task).
*Dealing with the operations and maintenance groups who are never satisfied is what I dislike most.
*To get here, I got a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Louisiana Tech and tried to intern and work in the industry as much as possible. After that, it's all about your experience and resume.
*I make about $100k not counting my overtime and mileage.
*I get 2 weeks of vacation a year. The time and a half overtime is probably the best perk.

Loffgren
08-26-2008, 07:04 PM
Master Electrician For Biotech Corp.

Own Electrical Contracting Corp.

Grover777
08-26-2008, 10:58 PM
Master Electrician For Biotech Corp.

Own Electrical Contracting Corp.

DNA perhaps?

erkoehler
08-26-2008, 11:02 PM
Love the job, demo boat is an awesome perk, but winters are a bit slow:confused:

loeweb
08-26-2008, 11:23 PM
Can't remember if I have previously posted but here it is again.

Physical Education Teacher.

Good: I love working with kids and get to see them in more of a natural setting (not behind a desk)

Great: Summers off and lots of family lake time although summers usually seem more busy than the school year.

Downfall: pay isn't great, but it's enough to survive.

Skipper
08-27-2008, 09:46 AM
I am a career active duty soldier in the United States Army. It is not really a job but more of a way of life. When not deployed in a combat theater my time is spent training for combat. Deployments are usually 12 to 15 months at a time. Of course the intensity of training and timelines vary from unit to unit, but generally when not deployed the mornings start with physical fitness training. Much time is spent on individual tasks to fine tune our combat marksmanship skills, combatives, and land navigation. Then you incorporate collective tasks where teams, squads, and platoons conduct battle drills, crew served weapons training, and evaluations.
Every month is different. Some months are training intensive where you may spend the entire month training. Some months are require less time and allow more personal time. The army supports itself, so some time is spent on taskings such as rendering honors at military funerals and other ceremonies. There are several 24 hour duties and you draw those once or twice a month, usually. You are subject to recall every day. Your personal freedom is really sacrificed.

Typically you stay with a unit for about three years at a time. Two of my children have graduated high school. Each of them attended two different high schools. My youngest is on his second high school as a sophmore. You have little input where you will be moved or what assignment you will fill, but sometimes it turns out to be a pretty good place to be.

Within the service there is great pride and healthy rivalry between units. At many garrisons we have a week of competitions for combatives, boxing, combat pistol and rifle marksmanship, and other tasks. This lifestyle can be rewarding, it is always challenging, and sometimes frustrating. Obviously it is dangerous and sometimes good men die. Nobody outside the military could ever really understand what it is like.

The pay is really not that great. The lower enlisted with young families are often challenged financially. Officers make significantly more than enlisted men. There are benefits that help offset the low base pay and these include but are not limited to health, dental, life insurance, housing allowances, and reenslitment bonuses.

As far as formal training, for enlisted you have basic training and a series of leadership training courses with each consecutive rank. There is also Airborne, Air Assault, Pathfinder, and the best are Rangers. It is all very challenging but creates the best soldiers on the planet.

You might be able to use your accounting degree as an officer working in finance. Then get branch detailed to the infantry. "

coz
08-27-2008, 09:59 AM
You are subject to recall every day. Your personal freedom is really sacrificed.

"

That's why I could only handle a 3 year tour :rolleyes:

Plus it would have been hard finding a job shooting a howitzer in civi life :D

I salute you Bill for you dedicated service :headbang:

Skipper
08-28-2008, 10:39 AM
...Plus it would have been hard finding a job shooting a howitzer in civi life :D...

Might I suggest maybe..... a fire for effect mission, PWC's turning circles in the open... oops, I did it again. Sorry.:o

brianpt
09-01-2008, 09:26 PM
im a wireline operator in alberta oil patch make good money train on the job minimal education needed work outdors and learn lots off skill

bigmac
09-01-2008, 09:36 PM
Can't remember if I have previously posted but here it is again.

Physical Education Teacher.

At what school do you teach, there in Omax?

TX.X-30 fan
09-01-2008, 09:42 PM
We design and install residential photovoltaic systems in the Seattle Washington area. I can't tell if its the economy or just that the market is saturated, but its been slow. :mad:








































:D:D

wakebrdr142
09-03-2008, 04:49 PM
Currently a residential appraiser. After a long road I just got the word I will be flying one of these.http://www.dash2.com/images/newimages/A-10Warthog.jpg

coz
09-03-2008, 04:54 PM
Currently a residential appraiser. After a long road I just got the word I will be flying one of these.http://www.dash2.com/images/newimages/A-10Warthog.jpg

Nice! the A-10 was our close air support when I was in the field artillery a long time ago, good luck and congrats. :toast:

midgetdigit
05-31-2010, 03:25 AM
Full time eBay powerseller

americanskierJim
05-31-2010, 12:46 PM
Iron Worker Welder during the summer and Body shop owner. I love the outdoor's during the summer and in the winter I like the indoors restoring cars.

BWB-745-
01-31-2012, 02:46 PM
Looking for some advice



I have an interview tomorrow in a completely different industry than the one I'm currently in. I've only been out of college around one and a half years so my only work experience is in insurance. The prospective job is in transportation.

In preparation to the interview, and typical interview questions, I'm completely lost as to how I can make some of the challenges I've face in insurance translate into how I would handle situations in this position.


Thanks in advance

thatsmrmastercraft
01-31-2012, 02:53 PM
Looking for some advice



I have an interview tomorrow in a completely different industry than the one I'm currently in. I've only been out of college around one and a half years so my only work experience is in insurance. The prospective job is in transportation.

In preparation to the interview, and typical interview questions, I'm completely lost as to how I can make some of the challenges I've face in insurance translate into how I would handle situations in this position.


Thanks in advance

Virtually all jobs are about putting out fires and having good organizational skills including being good at following up. As no two insurance claims are the same, emphasize your ability to multitask.

One of my favorite lines in an interview (as long as it is going well) is a trained monkey can perform most any job well, it's what a person does when things go wrong that make all the difference.

Good luck!

mikeg205
01-31-2012, 03:41 PM
Ahh great question... after being laid off at the peak of the Obama Recovery I have had a number of interviews. "that's" is correct but interviewers are using behavioral questions. There are many sites so just google it. The questions are designed to see how you think on your feet. ergo...if a fire started what would you do. My favorite one was - tell me about something that did not work out in your career and tell what went wrong and what you would do differently this time? Here they are looking for if you lernt anyeeting...

willyt
01-31-2012, 03:51 PM
My favorite questions from one of my recent interviews:
How many blades of grass do you think are on a football field?
How many packets of hot chocolate do you think the entire bank goes through in a year?
Why are manhole covers round?

Nailed the interview. Got the job. Winning.

gweaver
01-31-2012, 04:41 PM
So what answers did you give?

My thoughts:
1) Enough to keep a team of turf maintenance people busy.
2) Less than the amount of coffee.
3)No corners to catch things on/round is a stronger shape
G

mikeg205
01-31-2012, 04:48 PM
So what answers did you give?

My thoughts:
1) Enough to keep a team of turf maintenance people busy.
2) Less than the amount of coffee.
3)No corners to catch things on/round is a stronger shape
G

#3 is wrong....simpler....

Stx221
01-31-2012, 05:23 PM
#3 is because the cover will never fall through.

mikeg205
01-31-2012, 06:19 PM
Oh by the way - i am in sales...My company sells the cool printers that make the wraps for cars and boats.

2RLAKE
01-31-2012, 06:33 PM
when interviewing people, i look for learning behaviors .. tell me about a time when you failed and what would you do different ... i try to understand how they think and process info

Jerseydave
01-31-2012, 06:34 PM
#3 is because the cover will never fall through.

That is true......because a circle is the only shape that will allow that.

BWB-745-
01-31-2012, 06:52 PM
Virtually all jobs are about putting out fires and having good organizational skills including being good at following up. As no two insurance claims are the same, emphasize your ability to multitask.

One of my favorite lines in an interview (as long as it is going well) is a trained monkey can perform most any job well, it's what a person does when things go wrong that make all the difference.

Good luck!

Thanks, I'm pretty pumped about it.


I've already been through most of the behavioral stuff with the online personality tests and stuff. This is the first "real in person" interview.

MC205PSTAR
02-10-2012, 07:57 AM
Small Business owner, packaging equipment for bags, manual systems to full automatic systems. We design and build systems that fill, close and Palletize the bags in a factory. Love what I do! Deal with different solutions to problems every day.

Double D
02-10-2012, 09:23 AM
Small Business owner, packaging equipment for bags, manual systems to full automatic systems. We design and build systems that fill, close and Palletize the bags in a factory. Love what I do! Deal with different solutions to problems every day.

Thats the same business my Wife is in.

76S&S
02-10-2012, 09:31 AM
My degree says Accounting but that's not exactly what I do.

I work for a fairly large General Contractor, in Accounting, but I deal with all aspects of technology for our team. Custom reporting, new software, software upgrades, new technology...

It really beats being over the Accounting department (what I used to do) and managing 30+ employees.

Double D
02-10-2012, 10:31 AM
Speaking of jobs, my company is looking for a good Project Manager with knowledge in the Material Handling business including Conveyor experience and knows how to use AutoCAD.

Any of you MC boys looking for something? Here is a link to the ad and you don't have to live in this area to apply.

http://akroncanton.craigslist.org/tch/2820647104.html

O2BESOHUGE
02-10-2012, 10:49 AM
Architecture

BrooksfamX2
02-10-2012, 11:03 AM
Mechanical Engineering - 25 years designing and building manufacturing equipment for Hewlett-Packard and Xerox. Engineering Project Manager now for the semiconductor equipment industry....I have always liked my job........but would rather be boating.

Coast Guard might have been fun.

barefoot
02-10-2012, 11:41 AM
I own a retail coffee shop, kiosk, and coffee catering company. There are some days I love it more than others. Overall, I wouldn't turn back.

I focus my interviews on customer service. For what we do, it's the most important thing. We have a solid training program that will make you a better barista. We can train you on the methods and techniques to make great coffee. But if you don't have the skills to interact intelligently with me in an interview, most likely you won't work out very well here.

MIskier
02-10-2012, 02:53 PM
In my last year as a Naval Architecture student at the University of New Orleans.

My interests lie in high speed unconventional craft due to the technical complexity of the problems that they pose. As an intern I have worked on projects that ranged from Navy SOCOM craft, to offshore race boats, new product development for MasterCraft, and currently as an intern for a salvage firm based out of Ft. Lauderdale.

I grew up on the water and was always fascinated by boats and wanted to turn that into a career.

The job out look for a person with a NA&ME degree is great! Most of the students do several internships before graduating and have a job lined up well before graduation. Pay is great, and at the upper end of the spectrum for engineers with starting salaries ranging from 60-90k depending on the company.

CruisinGA
02-10-2012, 04:08 PM
Mechanical Engineer/Project Manager... Alternative energy (biogas, landfill gas, natural gas, co/trigeneration) I work for an engine manufacturer.

I've always loved engines, and now I work with them every day.

Having been on the job market twice in the last 18 months (hated first job out of college) - For me, interviewing was about having varied, practical experience as well as an ability to communicate what qualities will make you a valuable asset to the company. Also, confidence never hurts as well as an ability to relate to people.

wakefirst
02-10-2012, 05:20 PM
I work at a car auction. I handle all the bank repo's and sell them to dealers.
The auction business is fun and always changing, just like all business, when times are good-it's great!
My daily job is transporting repo's to the auction and setting the value of a unit for then bank to sell.
I like the auction business because its unique. I dislike it because it does have a ton of drama.
I started in the car business as a receptionist at a Dodge store. Worked my way into the auction business doing the same and then transfered in the General Motors Dept. Where I am now, I started in sales at the auction and worked up to Fleet Lease Manager
I make enough to afford my expensive lifestyle and taste.

I do enjoy working in the auction business, it is constantly changing. Car dealers are hilarious to work with. (most are bipolar, i swear) so you never know what your going to get! LOL I work with presidents and vice presidents of banks, such as US Bank, BofA, Ford, General Motors...etc

mwg
02-10-2012, 05:46 PM
I am a mechanical engineer who works in operation and maintenance for a large university. I also manage about 70 technicians. I love what I do most days; no 2 days are ever the same.

Jetlag
02-10-2012, 11:24 PM
Helicopter mechanic
Flew me into Mumbai (Bombay) for a 5 hour engine repair

BWB-745-
02-17-2012, 12:46 PM
Thanks, I'm pretty pumped about it.


I've already been through most of the behavioral stuff with the online personality tests and stuff. This is the first "real in person" interview.


Well, I got the job! Moving to Memphis this weekend and start on Monday.

The pay bump will most definitely expedite my boat purchase and conveniently enough there is a MasterCraft dealer up there! Not that I'm buying a new boat, still want to pay in full and not have payments.

Any TT members in the Memphis area?

Djswin1
03-04-2012, 10:16 AM
I work for a large, privately held insurance company.
I am an Account Manager and work with mostly public school employees.
I have a degree in Exercise Science.
The average pay for entry level acct managers is around $40-$60k, while Senior Acct Managers and up make $80-$175k and up.
I love my job and meeting with teachers but hate traveling.
The company that I work for has great benefits (great base salary, company car, etc.) and is listed in the top 100 places to work by Forbes for the last 9 years.

But, we were able to buy a new MasterCraft because my wife, who teaches 3rd grade sells her lesson plans on a website called Teacherspayteachers.com and makes more on there than she does teaching. (She makes around $60k as a teacher, 8 yrs experience with an Education Specialist degree). This extra cash is our "fun money".

hondaprlud
03-04-2012, 01:16 PM
I work at a car auction. I handle all the bank repo's and sell them to dealers.
The auction business is fun and always changing, just like all business, when times are good-it's great!
My daily job is transporting repo's to the auction and setting the value of a unit for then bank to sell.
I like the auction business because its unique. I dislike it because it does have a ton of drama.
I started in the car business as a receptionist at a Dodge store. Worked my way into the auction business doing the same and then transfered in the General Motors Dept. Where I am now, I started in sales at the auction and worked up to Fleet Lease Manager
I make enough to afford my expensive lifestyle and taste.

I do enjoy working in the auction business, it is constantly changing. Car dealers are hilarious to work with. (most are bipolar, i swear) so you never know what your going to get! LOL I work with presidents and vice presidents of banks, such as US Bank, BofA, Ford, General Motors...etc

Awesome. I could be considered one of those bipolar car dealers. We have a few independent dealerships. I try to avoid actually going to an auction at all costs. I handle the inventory acquisition and repo disposal, as well as hiring and evaluating talent.

Owning your own business is a wonderful thing if you're up for it. If not its the worst decision you could possibly make.

Panda Cub
03-04-2012, 08:38 PM
Hi skewl teechr.

But seriously, love it!

PT 1999 ProStar
03-04-2012, 10:11 PM
I work for one of the largest Medical Device company in the world. I am a Territory Manager selling a device that helps remove a pre-cancerous lesions in the esophagus called Barrett’s Esophagus. I like my job because it’s rewarding knowing you have possibly saved someone from getting Esophageal cancer. What I don't like about it.....I guess it’s the fact that I'm always chasing a "number" but that's what sales is all about. I completed four years of college with a major in economics. Training for the job was and still is pretty intense. The pay is very rewarding and like in any sales job the more you put into it the more you'll make.

dmayer84
03-04-2012, 10:43 PM
Information Security Analyst for a healthcare system. I do everything from making sure our new systems are implemented in a secure manner, forensic investigations, network monitoring, web filtering and doing audits. Get to do awareness training for all the employees and touring our facilities to make sure people are in compliance with policies.

Nothing like a day of looking at 0x4500 - packets