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View Full Version : O'brien Mission....thoughts?


bridomine99
01-27-2008, 02:09 AM
I'm considering a O'brien Mission slalom ski with double Targa binding and I'm curious if what people think of this ski? I am far from a expert slalom skier and would probably consider myself intermediate to recreational. My budget is about $400-450 and want to get something that I can grow into from a performance perspective as we get back into sking and improve over time.

Last summer I had a O'brien Siege for a few weeks and it liked it; however I ended up having to return it due to defects and am currently without a ski.

Also, what are your thoughts on single vs double boots? I was leaning toward doubles; however this weekend at the boat show one of the reps from a local dealer (not Midwest MC), seemed to be very against them. He commented that many skiers are reverting back to toe plates and that he feels doubles are more dangerous.

Thanks

ShamrockIV
01-27-2008, 09:35 AM
You seem to be in the same boat as me. i am new ski shoping too!!
I keep hearing great stuff about the obrein synchro. i am also looking at the connelly fx1. i just got a set of draft boots so i guess that tells you my feeling toward double boots!!!!

BrianM
01-27-2008, 11:20 AM
Lots of good skis out there in your range but I know nothing about the Mission. Look into the Synchro, Connelly F1X or Connelly Concept or even the Radar Senate. I don't know what the dealer was trying to feed you about the toe plate but very few higher end skiers use them. I would reccomend a set of Wiley highwraps for a ski of this calibur. Can be had at a reasonable price are very good binders and comfortable. You can get a Concept with a set of double Wileys for $399. Nice setup for the money.

yippikaiyay
01-27-2008, 02:27 PM
I'm considering a O'brien Mission slalom ski with double Targa binding and I'm curious if what people think of this ski? I am far from a expert slalom skier and would probably consider myself intermediate to recreational. My budget is about $400-450 and want to get something that I can grow into from a performance perspective as we get back into sking and improve over time.

Last summer I had a O'brien Siege for a few weeks and it liked it; however I ended up having to return it due to defects and am currently without a ski.

Also, what are your thoughts on single vs double boots? I was leaning toward doubles; however this weekend at the boat show one of the reps from a local dealer (not Midwest MC), seemed to be very against them. He commented that many skiers are reverting back to toe plates and that he feels doubles are more dangerous.

Thanks
From someone who skied with a rear toe plate for alot of years, and is now using double boots, I recommend them. Somewhat of a learning curve for me to get on to a two foot start, but other than that, I love 'em. And injury wise, can't speak to increased danger, but I can tell you I release out of them just fine when I need to. And my bindings are very tight.

JohnE
01-27-2008, 05:10 PM
I vote for the Wiley double high wraps. Call them and tell them your ability and go with what they suggest. You won't be disappointed.

h2oskifreak
01-27-2008, 06:45 PM
If you are serious about skiing hard, get the double boot. One reason...ankle injuries. Competition skiers wear them tight. The reason, they don't want them to come off. I came out of one boot two years ago and broke my ankle. If I wore a rear toe, I would be out of the rear boot most of the time. Why invite a twisting ski on one ankle. The more you ski, the easier it is to avoid the killer falls or at least control them. If you don't fall much, your not skiing to your potential. Just learn to fall correctly as possible and that means "stay w/ the ski" (both feet). The other big reason is ski control. Pretty hard to do w/ one foot not completely secured to the ski. I know someone will point out pros who use a rear toe, but they are so few and far between. Certianly don't do it to save $. You will save $ on stitches to you head and ankle E.R. visits.

h2oskifreak
01-27-2008, 06:48 PM
One additional thing when buying boots, buy them a little small. They loosen after some use. Try them on at a slalom shop and get them to through in a bottle of binding slime.

Ryan
01-28-2008, 11:51 PM
I ski on an Obrien Verdict -before the Mission- and like it alot. I have not examined or skied a Mission yet, but suspect it is the same ski.

88 PS190
01-29-2008, 12:42 AM
My thoughts for you.

I won't comment on the ski, I haven't used it.

The targa binding I believe is an adjustable binding. I've never had luck with any binding that is designed to adjust to several foot sizes for slalom. There is just too much ankle room to allow for sizing, which means ankle movement, its trouble.

Double vs. Single. I am not seeing people going back, I am seeing certain skiers remaining single, and many skiers remaining double. The British skiers seem to be much more into the single boot, which is of course useful for cold weather dock step offs. Some skiers use rear toe plates so they can shift their rear ankle to push the ski more on edge.

Safety wise. I spiral fractured a femur in a rather loose single binding. Reason, if your one foot is trapped in and doesn't come out and your body spins on the surface, somethings gotta give. No rubber binding is capable of releasing unless the ankle lifts from the foot bed. In properly fitted dual boots this variety of fall has both of your feet connected to the ski. And that resists this rotation. If you go out the front this will still release out of most rubber boot systems (not all)

In an out the front type crash forces are different, so they are worth considering separately.

I would personally not recommend any non-exit style system to anyone who is not skiing at a very high level and demanding of performance.

My personal choice in rubber binding systems would be double wiley bindings, I would probably order the Trick wrap pro build bindings front and rear. These have a stiffer side to side support (which I need my ankles are terrible)

My personal choice in bindings is over budget http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m298/hawkskier/DCP_1197.jpg for me these bindings provide what I was looking for, either both come off, or both stay on the ski. Where you need to be careful is that a slow OTF crash will not release the bindings very easily, as the velcro used does require a bit of oomph to fully disengage. Love the support, which is one of my main considerations, lateral ankle stability is my weakness.

bkblaida
01-31-2008, 06:32 PM
I skied a Syncro for 2 years (great ski, no complaints) and last season on advise from ski school switched to an HO Triumph. I like this ski a lot and find it very responsive in the course. The Triumph is a shaped ski much like the Syncro and is designed for both the course and open water when skiing 28 to 32 mph. I find it easier to control in the course and is just more nimble and responsive when rounding the bouys.

Boots?? I prefer single boot w/RTP. The HO Venom is an affordable and comfortable boot. No injuries in 40 years of skiing but the logic of 2 boots is hard to argue with. Check out HO.

mrprostar
01-31-2008, 06:46 PM
I am in the same boat too. I am skiing my dads slalom ski from the early 90's. Seems to be working pretty well, but I'm ready for something else. With a new house, new truck and new dog I couldn't possibly afford the one i want. Does anyone that used to ski a 67" Syncho and want to get rid of it? I would love some Wiley high wraps, but you get what you pay for.

corey
01-31-2008, 07:05 PM
Bridomine99,

Not sure who you spoke to but I have a good guess. Anyhow, the debate over double boots and a rear toe plate is mostly a personal preferance and properly fitted boots should help minimize the chance of injury.

Long story short MWMC has a performance guarantee, so if you don't like the set up you get from us you can exchange it for another or swap out a rear boot for a rear toe. Bottom line we want you to love your ski and if you don't it doesnt reflect well on us so feel free to tell us how you feel.

We also have a demo program however switching back and forth over the course of a weekend may not give you a real feel for how the ski performs, which is why we back up every purchase. I usually recommend to ski the heck out of your ski so that you can give an accurate description of what you do and don't like, and to get a reference point from which to judge additional skis.