PDA

View Full Version : Engine Hours


Skidawg
01-02-2008, 03:51 PM
Hey guys, I’ve noticed that a lot of skiers own their boats for several years but have very low hours. Most people’s boats are four to eight years old with 100 to 300 hours. My boat is a 2004 and already has 425 hours on it. I only ski the course but my son is a wake boarder. Needless to say, my boat racks up hours from boarding alone. My question is how many hours can you normally run a MasterCraft 197 before having to rebuild the engine?

east tx skier
01-02-2008, 03:54 PM
About 430. Maybe 435. Good luck.























;)
The number often tossed around is 2,000 hours. Depends more on maintenance than anything though.

93ProStar205
01-02-2008, 03:58 PM
I have heard/read 1,500 to 2,000 with required maintenance. Had a 93 PS 205 with over 840 hours when I sold it - used no oil and ran strong every season.

Muttley
01-02-2008, 04:04 PM
I've been told 3,000 by my dealer, but I have yet to see a ski boat with that many hours on the original engine. They usually get parked and neglected into needing a rebuild before 2,000.

OhioProstar
01-02-2008, 04:07 PM
1034 Hours...no oil burn...smooth as silk.

6ballsisall
01-02-2008, 04:12 PM
2k easy if its taken care of.

André
01-02-2008, 05:26 PM
About 430. Maybe 435. Good luck.
lol!!!
:D :)

rem_pss308
01-03-2008, 03:38 AM
I have about 1600 on mine. still running strong, and no loss of oil.

André
01-03-2008, 10:42 AM
I think we have a member name SS4000+ who is on the original engine with more then 4000 hrs as his name says...
Don't think it was rebuilt but as usual...ICBW!

BIGBADBLUE
01-03-2008, 11:11 AM
I have 1,100 on my '94 ... I did not run it for 2 seasons when I was on an assignment. Runs like a champ. I wish my front upholstery was holding up as strong.

I talked to the Chief Designer for Indmar last year and he said to expect over 2,000 before a rebuild with proper care.

ridesdirt
01-04-2008, 05:25 PM
I talked to the Chief Designer for Indmar last year and he said to expect over 2,000 before a rebuild with proper care.


That makes me want to put some more hours on mine..... now!

peason
01-04-2008, 05:43 PM
I have 1,100 on my '94 ... I did not run it for 2 seasons when I was on an assignment. Runs like a champ. I wish my front upholstery was holding up as strong.

I talked to the Chief Designer for Indmar last year and he said to expect over 2,000 before a rebuild with proper care.

I have almost 500 hours on my 2002, that I bought in 2003 - we put on about 125 hours a summer. Change the oil every 50 hours, winterize it my self - runs strong.

jbfootin
01-04-2008, 06:24 PM
Don't remember who told me this, but 1000 hrs on a boat is similar to 100,000 miles on a car.

Not sure if it is true, but seems to fall in line with the 1500 to 2000 hrs rule of thumb and is easy to remember....for me atleast.

1boarder
01-04-2008, 06:26 PM
My dad's 85 is at 1500 and still going strong.

jbanczak
01-05-2008, 02:59 AM
I've heard this formula of 100hrs=10k miles as well, and I've always been curious where this came from. I suspect it comes from the dealer.... so when you get to 500hrs you feel you need a new boat.... Just did a search on google, and I've now read that 100hrs = 5-15k miles.

So thinking through wear and tear on an engine... here are my thoughts...

* I've heard that boat engines run a lot cooler in almost all circumstances than a car. Assuming that the water intake is working properly, the actualy temp of the block stays quite a bit lower. That would seem to cause less wear.

* Typically, most hours put on a ski boat are at a higher, steady rpm resulting in a slightly lower speed than a car - similar to "higway miles" on a car... when the gear ratio is considered. That would seem to cause less wear.

* If we were just flat-out tracking miles.... we could guess average speed on the boat, multiply by hours. I'm guessing my average speed between skiing, boarding, cruising, etc. is probably around 30mph... so 100hrs would equate to 3,000 miles on a car in that direct relationship.

* If you are doing a lot of skiing/boarding - then you are not talking about gradual acceleration.... so you are stepping on the gas a lot - that has to add to the wear...

* One of the big culprits for engine wear is dust... there is a lot more dust on the street than on the lake. That would seem to mean less wear on the boat.

* Of course corrosion is just as bad, but in fresh water, with EFI, it really shouldn't be an issue on the engine itself.

So it seems that 100hrs=10k on a car just doesn't seem right. Seems more like 100=5k is probably more accurate, but maybe I'm missing something big?

FrankSchwab
01-05-2008, 04:45 AM
Well, here are the thoughts I've gathered:

* I've heard that boat engines run a lot cooler in almost all circumstances than a car. Assuming that the water intake is working properly, the actualy temp of the block stays quite a bit lower. That would seem to cause less wear.

IMHO, Boats tend to have slightly lower thermostats than cars, but as long as temperature is within reason, I don't see any reason why an engine running at 160 degrees will last any longer than one at 180.


* Typically, most hours put on a ski boat are at a higher, steady rpm resulting in a slightly lower speed than a car - similar to "higway miles" on a car... when the gear ratio is considered. That would seem to cause less wear.

Boat engines tend to run at much higher loads than a car engine. If you put a 350 into a, say, pickup and drove down the highway at 65 mph, you'd probably only be using 50 hp of the 300 available to you. If you're pulling a skier at 36, you're probably using 150 of the 300 available to you. The extra load most definitely causes additional engine wear.

To see what I mean, here's data from http://www.boats.com/news-reviews/article/performance-report-mastercraft-x-78212-want-for-nothing
At 25 mph 3.9 mpg
At 35 mph 3.2 mpg
At 45 mph 1.9 mpg
At WOT 1.7 mpg
Imagine the trailer that you'd be pulling uphill if you were only getting 3.9 MPG while going 25 mph. That's the kind of load that a boat puts on an engine.

Other things you're missing:
1. Boats tend to sit in cold, wet areas all winter long. Many owners don't do anything more than park it in terms of winterization. Imagine how much oil is left on cylinder walls, on camshafts, and in rod bearings after sitting, unmoving, for six months. Then, you're going to start it, and its going to run for several seconds with no oil because it has all drained out of the oil galleys. You only do that once a year, but even so...
Of course, this description doesn't apply to anyone on this board.

2. Boats tend to have "accidents" during their lives that shorten their existence. Almost everyone has shredded an impeller pump once, and the overheat cycles don't help. Many have sucked something into the water intake that causes an overheat also.

3. Boats suffer a lot of starting cycles. I never pick up a skier with the engine running - it always gets shut off when they get close. During a 4 hour afternoon stint, we can start the boat 20 times or more. More unusual wear.

4. Boats don't have the emissions controls of cars, or the precise fuel metering.
25 years ago when I was a kid with a 15 year old car, draining the oil every 3000 miles was a real necessity - you got ugly looking black tar out of that crankcase. 3 months ago when I changed the oil in my Explorer after 5000 miles, it still looked good - transparent, but darker than new oil. A lot of this is due to old cars getting a lot of fuel blown past the rings, etc., and screwing with the oil. 100,000 miles on an engine back then before a rebuild was considered good. Today, it's 200,000 on the engine.
Our boats have the same problem with fuel contaminating the oil as that 40 year old car had; draining the oil out of my boat reminds me of those halcyon days of my youth; it's black.

With luck and good maintenance, you should easily see 1000 hours on your engine, and as much as 2000. But don't think that your boat engine has an easy job.

/frank

Leroy
01-05-2008, 10:27 AM
I did a poll some time ago and there were many in the 1500-2000 hours and most had not rebuilt or done anything major. Most of these were boats from the 80's and I expect boats from the 90's and 00's will perform even better.