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View Full Version : Lamps to protect engine


Bruce
12-31-2007, 04:15 PM
It is supposed to get to 25 deg. for two nights in a row here. ( I know that is spring time for some of you!) I plan on putting some lights in the engine compartment( along with a dehumidifier that has a blower and is supposed to be the equivalent of a 100 watt bulb.). The two lights are 75 watt flood lights in reflectors. I have one near the rear aimed at the water pump. The other at the front aimed at the flush out kit. The boat is a 1999 230VRS V Drive. The engine is the 5.7 Vortec MX
Question: Will this generate enough heat in this closed compartment to do the job? The boat hangs in slip over water. I could go to quartz halogen and generate more heat but I'm not sure about the safety issue.
I know I should drain the engine but that is another story.

Jerseydave
12-31-2007, 04:32 PM
I would drain everything if I were you, I'm not a big fan of light bulbs in engine bays where there could be fuel vapors around. I know many people have done it though.

We still have 3+ months of winter, do you plan on using your boat much between now and March/April?

Chicago190
12-31-2007, 04:33 PM
I know I should drain the engine but that is another story.

Yup. Why worry about a power outage or the light not providing enough heat when you can drain the block and blow out the lines in the same amount of time and for less money than it takes to go out and buy a lamp and set it up.

chudson
12-31-2007, 04:34 PM
If you don't have one hardware stores sell little pocket thremometers like this. Placing it on top the engine and close the compatment for a few minutes and that may answer it for you. But then by the time you do all that you could have it drained, Goodluck!!!

30380

Rich_G
12-31-2007, 04:42 PM
to answer your original question..., it will provide more than enough heat. There was a guy on one of the other forums that did an experiment with thermometers that recorded the low temps. One light bulb in an enclosed box, such as the engine compartment will keep it above freezing. Obviously, its good to have the 2nd bulb as a backup.

Footin
12-31-2007, 06:31 PM
Do you have an electric blanket? If so, throw it over the engine.

mccobmd
12-31-2007, 07:01 PM
Be careful, my brother in law tried that with 2 bulbs, had a power outage and 3600 dollars later had a new engine block.

Bruce
12-31-2007, 07:31 PM
Thanks, one and all. First we are not as apt to loose power here compared to some of your location. i.e. ice/snow storms etc. The extra bulb dehumidifier with fan gives me reasonable backup. Winterizing here is a short term issue. My grandson may be skiing next week the way weather goes here. I finally pulled the plug on the starboard side. The t on the handle was free spinning so I could not just open it. I finally said what the hell go ahead and checked the port side. This meant undoing the power strut so I could drop the panel in the trunk to see the plug. The plug on that side looks like the temp. sensor. With a tiny bit of rust showing I decided no to risk breaking it.( At this point you need to understand my mechanical skill level: The big black thingy in the back is the motor right?) Hopefully with the plug on one side out and the heat sources I am o.k. Now before I replace the plug I need to get a new one with the T that works. Or is there something better?
Once again thanks for not beginning the responses with "hey stupid". It showed great restraint!
Happy new year to all!

east tx skier
12-31-2007, 07:39 PM
Forget the "t-thingy" petcocks and just unscrew the actual plug from the block. The thing with the wires is the knock sensor. I should unscrew with the plug. Two plugs on the rear of the manifold risers. Then, all you have to do is unscrew the hose clamps and pull the hoses at their low points. This can be done in under 10 minutes with absolutely no mechanical ability required. I wouldn't take the chance if it were my boat.

atlfootr
12-31-2007, 07:57 PM
Just drain the engine block, it's the safe and easiest way to assure any boat from a cracked or freezing block :)

JLeuck64
12-31-2007, 08:29 PM
If your boat is equipped with a heater you should disconnect both of those hoses and blow through one to remove as much water as possible. If you don't have a heater, no worries then...

Leroy
01-01-2008, 01:51 AM
As you've heard, drain it, the other option that I was told is to just drop it in the water assuming your water temp is pretty warm. I don't know how effective that is, but was told that by my local hydrohoist lift rep. Of course that has it's own risks....

At your local automotive shop you can buy magnetic heaters that attach to the block or oil pan and keep the engine warm. I bought one for $30.

Farmer Ted
01-01-2008, 01:58 AM
It is supposed to get to 25 deg. for two nights in a row here. ( I know that is spring time for some of you!) I plan on putting some lights in the engine compartment( along with a dehumidifier that has a blower and is supposed to be the equivalent of a 100 watt bulb.). The two lights are 75 watt flood lights in reflectors. I have one near the rear aimed at the water pump. The other at the front aimed at the flush out kit. The boat is a 1999 230VRS V Drive. The engine is the 5.7 Vortec MX
Question: Will this generate enough heat in this closed compartment to do the job? The boat hangs in slip over water. I could go to quartz halogen and generate more heat but I'm not sure about the safety issue.
I know I should drain the engine but that is another story.


if the boat is on a lift why not just drop her into the water at night?

Maristar210
01-01-2008, 03:12 AM
Amen to that Farmer.


While water does freeze at 32. I have placed a cup full of water in my garage on the floor and noticed it stays liquid down to 20 at least. Residual heat from the house I suspect...

rem_pss308
01-01-2008, 04:26 AM
I ussually put my cover over the boat, and have one flood light bulb in it, this keeps it pretty warm. ( below freezing )

the temp wont be below freezeing for more than a few hours.

Im sure two bulbs in the engine compartment will be fine.

I use mine all thru the winter too. so I dont drain it.

BrianM
01-01-2008, 10:24 AM
Bruce,

PM sent. I will be glad to run by today and show you how to get it drained. That way you have zero worries. When you want to use it again all you will have to do is drop it in and go.

j2nh
01-01-2008, 11:30 AM
Be careful with light bulbs. Those buggers can get mighty hot, a friend had a trouble light in his 190 and somehow the thing ended up on the carpet and proceeded to melt it. If you use one go with multiple low wattage bulbs or better yet drain.

Run the boat in the evening before putting it up on the station, engine will stay warm all night.

Bruce
01-01-2008, 02:57 PM
Talk about "the kindness of strangers"! As you can see in this thread BrianM offered to come over and drain the engine for me. Well, he came over this AM and took out every plug, disconnected and drained every hose etc.(That boat is drier than a popcorn f--t) On a V drive it is a little harder. You have to disconnect the power strut, take out the trunk dividers, and work in a close space. It is a real knuckle buster. He never once complained. Brian truly exemplifies the quality people that make up this team! I've made a new friend and boat is ready to take on the cold. My system may have worked but as Brian said "draining it will give you peace of mind" How right he was.
Thanks Brian and thanks to all of you who responded.
Happy New Year!

Monte
01-01-2008, 03:05 PM
Way to go above and beyond Brian... That's what TT is all about!

Willski
01-01-2008, 03:55 PM
Cool deal. Yer the man Brian.

BrianM
01-01-2008, 05:01 PM
Glad I could help. Those V drivers are a little bit tighter to get to things. Was nice to meet another TMC guy especially a local one.

Leroy
01-01-2008, 05:08 PM
That is great Brian! This forum really is more than a bunch of people sitting around at their PC!

Talk about "the kindness of strangers"! As you can see in this thread BrianM offered to come over and drain the engine for me. Well, he came over this AM and took out every plug, disconnected and drained every hose etc.(That boat is drier than a popcorn f--t) On a V drive it is a little harder. You have to disconnect the power strut, take out the trunk dividers, and work in a close space. It is a real knuckle buster. He never once complained. Brian truly exemplifies the quality people that make up this team! I've made a new friend and boat is ready to take on the cold. My system may have worked but as Brian said "draining it will give you peace of mind" How right he was.
Thanks Brian and thanks to all of you who responded.
Happy New Year!