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SteveO
12-14-2007, 12:40 PM
I have a SWS neo dry suit that I would call a "moist suit" I found one of the problems, a small hole in the neoprene, which needs repair. The suit is 2 years old and in generally good shape. Besides repairing the hole ( I assume they make repair kits?) what other maintenance needs to be performed???

Muttley
12-14-2007, 01:55 PM
You can get wax for the zipper. There's this stuff called Seal Saver which is like baby oil for the seals. My bud used to use baby powder.

I don't know if they make patch kits. When the seals go, they can be replaced at the manufacturers. At least my Bare can.

BrianM
12-14-2007, 01:59 PM
The SWS suits don't really have seals like the Bares do. They use a have neoprene for the seals as well. Not the thinner rubber like the baggies and hybrids.

Stevo call Connelly and ask them what they would use to repair. i know you can send it back to them for repair but I am sure they would tell you what to use to repair a pin hole.

atlfootr
12-18-2007, 07:24 PM
I have a SWS neo dry suit that I would call a "moist suit" I found one of the problems, a small hole in the neoprene, which needs repair. The suit is 2 years old and in generally good shape. Besides repairing the hole ( I assume they make repair kits?) what other maintenance needs to be performed???

I came across this looking through WS Online ... hope it helps.

http://www.waterskimag.com/article.jsp?ID=13224

Drysuits

By Peter Fleck and Ron Scarpa
Related Articles• Drysuits:The Players (http://www.waterskimag.com/article.jsp?ID=13225)

Keeping Ice Out of Your Shorts.

If you ever ask yourself whether you want to pay an extra 50 bucks for a good drysuit instead of an average one, ask this, too: During a cold midnight rain, would you rather sleep under a roof or under the cloud that's wringing itself out?

We've heard from footers who have cut seals on cheap suits and been soaked so badly with ice-cold water that they couldn't even climb back into the boat.

That's an extreme situation, but even if a suit leaks just a little, it's useless. The whole idea is to stay dry and warm at the start or tail end of the season.

Most barefoot instructors discourage students from getting in the water this time of year without a good drysuit. You can't concentrate if you're cold, and your muscles can't perform properly if they aren't warm.

When scouting the pro shops or catalogs for a drysuit, keep these hints handy:


Buy nylon suits only. A neoprene drysuit might look better on you and it might be fine for slalom, but it will pop holes under the pounding of a barefoot run. Nylon suits are made from material similar to that used for backpacks, and they'll take whatever you dish out.

Size it large. While standing in a nylon drysuit, you should be able to bend over and touch your toes without feeling a tug in the crotch. This degree of bagginess might look ridiculous in a mirror, but you'll need every bit of it in the water.
Look for Mauser seams (a seam with half-inch tape over it, very similar to the kind used on most barefoot suits). The seams are what make or literally break a drysuit. Mauser generally lasts longest and prevents leakage the best.
Check the warranty. Most suits will have a one-year warranty, excluding the seals. The seals aren't covered because people don't follow the guidelines below.After-purchase tips:

Never force your hands or feet through the ends of the sleeves or legs. The seals are tight at the wrists and ankles for a reason: to keep water out. Use a lubricant like baby powder or Seal Saver to help you gradually slide into the suit. Dish soap could eventually dry out certain types of seals.
Condition the seals with a lubricant like Seal Tech or Seal Saver. They're like Armor-All for the seals and can be found at Barefoot International or most dive shops.
If you aren't going to use the suit for a long period, make sure it's dried out, then roll it up, package it and store it in a cool place, but never in the garage or in direct light.
When a seal does break, you can have it replaced for $20-$30 and the suit will be like new again.