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Thomas205
11-07-2007, 10:19 AM
Hi,

Im currently living and boating in South Africa and this year they have introduced a new law which states that all boats need a "buoyancy certificate" This is supposed to be proof that if the boat takes on water it will not sink.

Would I be right in saying that all Mastercraft boats have built in buoyancy? Is there anyway of proving this? The authorities insist on some sort of certificate from the manufacturers.

My boat is a 1994 Prostar 205. Any help here would be much appreciated here.

Thomas

Jesus_Freak
11-08-2007, 03:48 AM
Would I be right in saying that all Mastercraft boats have built in buoyancy? Is there anyway of proving this?

Yes, and the proof is that people use them in the water. :D

As long as the boat is on top of the water, the primary buoyancy drivers are overall weight and volume of water displaced by the boat, i.e. a block of pine floats, while the same sized block of aluminum does not. Once the boat takes on water, things like foam and other adders become important. I know nothing about the 205's calculations; I am just speaking in general. I have the same boat, so I would be very interested if anyone knows any numbers...

TMCNo1
11-08-2007, 07:06 AM
Hi,

Im currently living and boating in South Africa and this year they have introduced a new law which states that all boats need a "buoyancy certificate" This is supposed to be proof that if the boat takes on water it will not sink.

Would I be right in saying that all Mastercraft boats have built in buoyancy? Is there anyway of proving this? The authorities insist on some sort of certificate from the manufacturers.

My boat is a 1994 Prostar 205. Any help here would be much appreciated here.

Thomas
Quite possibly, Greg Clower (Mastercraft Owner Relations/Team MasterCraft CSR) gregory.clower@mastercraft.com can assist in getting you some type of paperwork to cover your needs.

88 PS190
11-08-2007, 01:05 PM
Mastercrafts have emergency foam floatation, that should float your boat.

On the drivers side near the throttle there should be some sort of manufacturer's plaque that lists the weight maximums etc etc.

Now the numbers on that ie 8 persons or such and such pounds are not really reflecting what the boat can safetly handle while underway or opperated. In many boats you could hold more people, or you could be insane to put that many people in the boat. Those figures are solely the amount of weight that the foam floatation in good condition should be capable of maintaining on the surface. That should certify the foam floatation sufficiently.

If not perhaps mastercraft can provide further documentation of such and you should try the email listed by TMCNo1

Thomas205
11-12-2007, 03:49 AM
Thanks a lot for all the responses, I have emailed that guy with the details so hopefully he should get back to me this week sometime.

I presumed that the weight limit sticker next to the throttle would be sufficient but I think they want some physical evidence of buoyancy. Its that or the option of carrying hard flotation rings in the boat, one for each occupant - great!

The new laws also state that you need a fuel cut-off switch. This has to be visible, so not inside a hatch of anything. Does that sound strange? I would of thought having a fuel line lying around in the boat would be dangerous in itself?! Any ideas on getting around this?

Thanks again

TMCNo1
11-12-2007, 06:51 AM
Are you saying fuel shut off valve for the fuel line or a shut off switch for the battery or specifically the fuel pump?