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wakescene
10-03-2007, 06:33 PM
For those that are looking to do your own winterization this fall, check out this article I put together last year.
Winterizing your boat (http://www.wakeboardnj.com/docs/winterization/winterize.htm)

If you think something was missed, please post that item or step and I will add it. Its a living document and was originally put together to help others.

KG

bdecker
10-04-2007, 02:31 PM
I've made the decision to winterize myself this year, and will definitely get some help from someone who has done this before so there are no surprises in the spring... Should I drain it or run anitfreeze through the cooling system and why? Is one method better than the other? I do have the ability to manage the temp in my garage, but typically I don't run the heat in there because the upper level isn't finished or insulated, however I can probably keep it from getting to -30, if that makes any difference.

vogelm1
10-04-2007, 03:59 PM
Most folks on this forum are split 50/50 anti-freeze vs. drain. I asked my dealer what they do, and they only drain so I was fine with that...winterized myself from day one with a brand new 197 and haven't had a problem in 3 seasons now. I believe the owner's manual makes no reference to adding RV anti-freeze during winterization as well, so that must say something too. One less thing you need to do the way I see it. Have fun!

wakescene
10-05-2007, 05:54 PM
I've made the decision to winterize myself this year, and will definitely get some help from someone who has done this before so there are no surprises in the spring... Should I drain it or run anitfreeze through the cooling system and why? Is one method better than the other? I do have the ability to manage the temp in my garage, but typically I don't run the heat in there because the upper level isn't finished or insulated, however I can probably keep it from getting to -30, if that makes any difference.

bdecker,
+ For Closed Cooling Systems, I would change the coolant with fresh/New coolant and make sure that the Coolant in the system is capable of -30 degrees. Perhaps -40 degrees if your north of Berlin, NH(extended cold). Then just drain the heat exchanger and related raw water hoses real good and leave all hoses detached so that additional moisture can evaporate. (This is currently the method that I use and have had no problems, and by replacing the coolant with new, it's a cheap solution to keeping my piece of mind.)

+ For Raw Water Cooling systems I would say just drain it real good and leave all hoses detached so that additional moisture can evaporate.

*I have heard of some using compressed air to "blow" additional moisture out of the cavities in the block, but have never found any evidence that this actually works better than regular draining and evaporation.
**I have also heard of some using a shop vac to suck additional moisture out of the cavities in the block, but again have never found any evidence that this actually works better than regular draining and evaporation.
***As long as you remove as much as you can thru regular methods and the coolant is good, you should be fine. BUT definately get yourself a good coolant checker if that is the route your going.

skidim has sets of drain plugs for every available block on the market, for those that want to make this job easier, it's a wise investment. Here is the link...http://www.skidim.com/products.asp?dept=1044