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View Full Version : Need for speed and teenage drivers.


whitedog
03-08-2005, 12:50 AM
:( When returning to a friends house from a evening of bowling with a group of friends from a small southern WI town a car driven by a 16 year old girl went out of control on a straight strech of country road, hit a guard rail on a bridge, became airborn and rolled. Three kids died in this crash and another is in serious condition from the accident. All were thought to be wearing seatbelts but none the less two were ejected. The driver, a young lady, the front seat passenger and one in the back seat all died at the scene. There were other cars from the group following, fortunatly no one else was involved. Police reports indicate drinking was not a factor, but speed and ice patches on the road were.

I am posting this as I think about my own 15 year old and his younger sister who could have easily been included in an outing like this.

I know we all have a need for speed but we must teach our kids the importance on keeping it where it belongs. I hope none of you have to go through this as your kids grow up. I see many young families here and hope everyone takes the time to stress the importance of being a responsable driver with your kids. This is the second accident in the last three months caused by young drivers not paying attention, or driving to fast, it has taken 4 lives and now the survivors have to live with that. Lets train our kids to becareful so they can stay healthy.

Please forgive the long post.

Bongo
03-08-2005, 12:57 AM
Well stated.

Bongo

milkmania
03-08-2005, 01:07 AM
my 19 year old son's been pallbearer for 4 of his classmates...
I don't need to talk to him.

but what you say is correct!
We had a group killed last year that were goofing around in a Camaro....
9 kids in the car. they couldn't even determine who was driving.

Farmer Ted
03-08-2005, 08:17 AM
This past weekend we had a kid get caught speeding at 3 in the morning, doing 106 down I-20, pulled over and arrested for DUI, underage drinking, an whatever else they're going to pile on.

Needless to say, his "career" in the military will most likely be a short
one.

Luckily no one was hurt.

Mag_Red
03-08-2005, 09:08 AM
Sad stories for sure. My little girl has her learner's permit. She has already Killed a mailbox (federal offense) and knocked a mirror off the truck :rolleyes:

Professor
03-08-2005, 09:11 AM
Do any schools have Drivers Ed any more? Yeah, I guess I should know this...

Leroy
03-08-2005, 09:13 AM
Thanks for the story Whitedog. I find every story like this and read it with my 16 year old that has been driving on his own for past 6 months. We enforce by yourself rule except for going to soccer practice and back.

Leroy
03-08-2005, 09:16 AM
Our school "has it", but you schedule it and pay $360 for a private company to teach it!

Do any schools have Drivers Ed any more? Yeah, I guess I should know this...

bcampbe7
03-08-2005, 09:53 AM
Thanks for the story Whitedog.
I don't have kids yet but my brother turned 16 on March 1st. I will be sharing this with him.

They still have Driver's Ed at each High School I attended (I moved 1/2-way through my Junior year). I think every school system should provide Driver's Ed or at least, like in Leroy's case, have access to a private company. $360 is a bit steep, but may be worth it.

Thrall
03-08-2005, 11:13 AM
It's tough to hear about accidents like this, but I think in general, parents need to spend more time teaching their kids to drive. I know that's tough in the city, but in Southern WI and many other rural areas, it's easy to get your kid many hours of driving experience before turning them loose w/ the keys.
Driver's Ed in school and the few hrs behind the wheel w/ an instructor is not near enough training to prepare someonewho has never driven before.

MasterMason
03-08-2005, 11:21 AM
It's tough to hear about accidents like this, but I think in general, parents need to spend more time teaching their kids to drive. I know that's tough in the city, but in Southern WI and many other rural areas, it's easy to get your kid many hours of driving experience before turning them loose w/ the keys.
Driver's Ed in school and the few hrs behind the wheel w/ an instructor is not near enough training to prepare someonewho has never driven before.


Plus talk about great time spent with you kid. I remember the hours I spent driving with my dad, and riding as my older brother learned to drive as some of the best time ever spent with my father. Hopefully my older boy feels the same about all the hours we logged. Now if I could just teach him how to back the dam trailer up :steering:

Leroy
03-08-2005, 11:55 AM
In Indiana you can drive when you are 15 with parent in front seat with you. Very good. For first 3 months when you get your 16 license you drive alone, but cannot have anyone in the car with you other than parents. They are talking about increasing that to 1 year which I think would be good.

Serious car wrecks are the one thing that really scares me to death.

Bobby
03-08-2005, 02:05 PM
My parents made me drive everywhere when I had a permit. Hell, my mom even made me drive through rush hour in Dallas AND Houston traffic. If it ever iced over my dad stuck me in the car and went driving just for the sake of practice. From the time I was 15 1/2 until I was 16 I logged more hours of driving than I could possibly count. Because of that I have never had a wreck and never get nervous in a lot of traffic. It was also explained to me that tickets = higher insurance I'd have to pay. That and a radar detector help me stay out of trouble - with a Z28 that's pretty hard to do.

My parents also made me learn how to back the boat trailer when I was about 14 at our little lake neighborhood with a private ramp and had about 1 foot worth of error on each side of the trailor. Now at 20 I can back the boat in 1/4 the time everyone else can. It was borderline humorous on how many times I was asked by a middle aged mom to back the trailor for her this last summer.

JohnnyB
03-08-2005, 02:16 PM
I saw this in the Sunday paper last weekend and it scares me to death!! This is something I hope I can impress on my kids when they reach driving age. Unfortunately, I remember being 16. It's an age where you think you're invincible -- luckily I learned the speed/alcohol lesson by a friend's death before my own!! I still think about him often, about the impact on his parents, siblings and friends. I think seeing that first hand is the only way most kids learn.

Thanks for sharing....

whitedog
03-08-2005, 09:06 PM
This made papers all around the state. It is still in the local paper today. I agree about young drivers getting all the supervised time behind the wheel they can. My 15 year old started driving off road in my truck 2 years ago, he can also back a trailer better than many twice his age. I will start my daughter this summer same place, a friends farm pasture.

whitedog
03-08-2005, 09:13 PM
Unfortunately, I remember being 16. It's an age where you think you're invincible -- luckily I learned the speed/alcohol lesson by a friend's death before my own!!
Thanks for sharing....

JohnnyB Sorry to here you learned first hand. :(

I can relate, this scares the sh@t out of me. I watched as a car with 5 aquaintences was broadsided by a train (back in 1980) 4 did not make it. Again speed, alchol, and the invincibility of youth.

JEREMY79
03-08-2005, 10:01 PM
I guess it comes from living and working on our farm but at 10 years old it was nothing for me to get into a dually 4-speed truck and back a 30 foot cattle trailer into the barn. I really feel for these kids that dont get to drive until they get their license.

mika
03-09-2005, 04:28 PM
Like so many of you the minute I got my learners permit I was driving. I drove everywhere. I was pulling trailers driving in the snow (december bday). Granted I love to drive so no complaints. And I grew up in a family of speeders and i acutally got my first speeding ticket with my mom in the car.

I have a question for you all. I have for a long time though that drivers training should include things like car control. Students need to learn how to correct an over steer situation, braking techniques ect. I also feel that every person who has a drivers license should also have to go through the same training a someone does to get the cycle endorsment; reguardless if they ever ride a motorcycle. Well I could go on and on about this. But my question is how many parents would pay more to put their kids through a more intensive drivers training course. Would you pay 750 dollars for something like this. I only ask because it is something that I have thrown around for a long time. I have though many times of opening a business where advanced skills can be taught.

bcampbe7
03-09-2005, 04:36 PM
Mika-
I don't have kids (yet) but I would pay any amount of money if I knew it would help them learn proper driving technique and emergency recovery skills. There is no substitute for hands-on experience. In this case, a very controlled environment is a must. The school's owner's liabiblity may be the deterent for this type of school though. An idea would be to have a parent and child take it together. I know many adults that could always use more driver training, me included. :o

The father of a friend of mine paid a few thousand dollars to go here:
Bondurant (http://www.bondurant.com/pages/home.html)

Here's one for the kids:
Tennage Driving School (http://www.bondurant.com/courses/Teendriv.html)

I think something like that would be a blast.

mika
03-09-2005, 04:40 PM
Yeah the laibility ins would be a killer. And you are so right the Parents joining would be nice. I figure there has to be a way that it could happen.

Thrall
03-09-2005, 06:41 PM
I agree w/ you Mika, 100%. I think, however, that the liability of an outside agency doing this would be huge and consequently so would the cost.
This just reinforces my original point. Parents need to spend more time w/ their kids training them to drive! Like many of you here, I learned to drive at about age 10, w/ my dad, in pastures, woods trails, farm roads. I was also taught vehicle control (on ice/snow). Dad and I just called it havin' fun, spinnin' brodies in snow covered parking lots, but by the time I got my license, I could throw the old 68 GMC, 3 on the tree, into a sideways slide and recover it like nothing ever happened. It came from practice (and good parents).

captkidd
03-15-2005, 03:14 PM
About three weeks ago two teenagers here were killed when the SUV they were riding in crashed through a brick sign and into a tree/pole. Apparently the 16 year old driver was going 70-75 in a 45 mph zone when he ran off the side of the road, over-corrected and ran off the other side of the road, through the sign and into the tree (or pole, I can't remember). None of the kids were wearing seatbelts, and the two in the back seat were both killed, and the two in the front seat were severely injured.

I totally agree with giving your kids all the driver training (both personal and professional) that you can, but even that isn't going to protect them when they drive too fast and don't wear seatbelts. This is why it's imperative that the parents explain the dangers, the responsibilities, and the consequences of getting behind the wheel and being stupid. Some kids are going to do what they want regardless of how hard the parents try to teach them, but far too many parents don't get as involved as they should. Sounds like you guys are doing a good job.

ski36short
03-15-2005, 11:08 PM
A week ago Saturday a kid came flying out from a parking lot to do a left and apparently didn't see me (more likely didn't look); I had nowhere to go so I T-boned him full speed (48 mph). I think we were all were lucky that there were no serious injuries on either side. I did manage to correct just enough to hit just in front of the cab otherwise someone in that truck would have been in bad shape. I think there were some stitches on their side (that I know of) but I managed to escape with only a bruised hand. It was quite an impact and quite an experience! Thank God for seatbelts, airbags, and inertia!

Oh and he had no license, insurance, or US citizenship. Thankfully I wasn't driving my car, the company can deal with all that....

Leroy
03-15-2005, 11:25 PM
Thank goodness you were not hurt Ski36short. Testament to modern safety improvements.

whitedog
03-15-2005, 11:33 PM
Glad to here you were not hurt.


Got muyself yelled at by my 12 year old last night for not wearing my seat belt. We started them young and impressed the importance of safety, goes for on the boat also, now she does not let me get away with much of anything.

jsonova99
03-16-2005, 08:58 AM
A week ago Saturday a kid came flying out from a parking lot to do a left and apparently didn't see me (more likely didn't look); I had nowhere to go so I T-boned him full speed (48 mph). I think we were all were lucky that there were no serious injuries on either side. I did manage to correct just enough to hit just in front of the cab otherwise someone in that truck would have been in bad shape. I think there were some stitches on their side (that I know of) but I managed to escape with only a bruised hand. It was quite an impact and quite an experience! Thank God for seatbelts, airbags, and inertia!

Oh and he had no license, insurance, or US citizenship. Thankfully I wasn't driving my car, the company can deal with all that....

I think the pure rage that I would have built up would have killed me on the scene if the accident didn't!!! :mad:

captkidd
03-25-2005, 10:10 AM
Unfortunately another teenager died in a car accident here this week. He was driving through town and lost control of his car, crossed the little cement median and hit a minivan head on. The lady driving the minivan also died of her injuries. Apparently he was speeding and not wearing a seatbelt, even though it was raining pretty hard; he was thrown from the car and killed.

That's the third teenager in less than a month that has died here because someone was driving too fast and not wearing a seatbelt. How many have to die before they realize that they're not invincible? The number one cause of death for teenagers is automobile accidents; I only have about 12 years to drill this into my son's head and I'm already scared.

jsonova99
03-25-2005, 10:24 AM
Unfortunately another teenager died in a car accident here this week. He was driving through town and lost control of his car, crossed the little cement median and hit a minivan head on. The lady driving the minivan also died of her injuries. Apparently he was speeding and not wearing a seatbelt, even though it was raining pretty hard; he was thrown from the car and killed.

That's the third teenager in less than a month that has died here because someone was driving too fast and not wearing a seatbelt. How many have to die before they realize that they're not invincible? The number one cause of death for teenagers is automobile accidents; I only have about 12 years to drill this into my son's head and I'm already scared.

I get the queston all of the time, "can we have a baby?" There's just too much out there to worry about, from the topic of this thread to the sexual predators, drugs, school shootings, etc. I don't know if fatherhood is for me. I think having to worry about all of this on a regular basis would be overwhelming

whitedog
03-26-2005, 02:20 AM
I get the queston all of the time, "can we have a baby?" There's just too much out there to worry about, from the topic of this thread to the sexual predators, drugs, school shootings, etc. I don't know if fatherhood is for me. I think having to worry about all of this on a regular basis would be overwhelming

I know for me becoming a father was the best thing that could have happened. Yes there are troubles to worry about but all in all it is a small bart of raising kids. I think most parents on here will atest to that. We tend to be somewhat sarcstic about our worries.

None the less teens will always think of themselves as invincable and it is our job as parents to try and scare some sence into them.

From a proud father of two teenagers.:)

Leroy
03-26-2005, 03:24 AM
jsonova99; Everyone has to make that decision, but I would say a good parent is in control at least 99% of the time. There is always so many things that can go wrong even to us adults, but again >99% of the time good things happen. Also, boating and kids go great together.

This from someone with 16, 14, and 10 yr olds.