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Jeffory
09-23-2007, 12:00 PM
I have a 94 205 that will be stored in a heated garage. I will add fuel stabilizer (sea foam or stabil) and change the oil.
Is there anything else that I should do to the boat?

Thanks,
Jeff

Footin
09-23-2007, 12:03 PM
Yes, drain the water out of the block. What happens if the heat goes out?

André
09-23-2007, 12:06 PM
Yes, drain the water out of the block. What happens if the heat goes out?
:cry: :cry: :cry:

Footin is right ,always at least drain the water...

prostar205
09-23-2007, 12:23 PM
If you have a heater, drain the water from that as well. Few things are worse than a split heater core with that water all over your carpet.

Jeffory
09-23-2007, 12:32 PM
Thank you for the suggestions. Where do you drain the water from the block?
Should I start it up briefly after I take it out of the water to blow out the water or is that a no-no?

Jeff

JimN
09-23-2007, 12:52 PM
There are tons of threads and posts about winterizing here- do a search.

bigmac
09-23-2007, 01:03 PM
Starting it up in the driveway won't help much, and will likely fry the impeller. Page 51 of your owner's manual details winterizing procedures.

If you live in an area where temps get below freezing, you should definitely drain the block and exhaust manifolds. If you have a heater, that too should be drained and the lines blown out with air or pumped full of RV antifreeze. You should change the oil and filter, change the transmission oil, fog the engine, and most here would recommend that you drain the raw water pump and pull the impeller. You could re-use that impeller if it's intact, but for $30 a new one is a good investment, putting it in in the spring. A little lube for the starter gear, and the boat should be safe for midwest winter temps.

Don't forget to mouse-proof. Tape the exhaust flaps down and put a bunch of D-Con packages all around. According to legend, Bounce dryer sheets will repel mice, but that concept is of debatable validity. I do it anyway. If you're going to cover the boat, consider some sort of mildew-preventing technology. I'm a big fan of heater-fans like this (http://www.overtons.com/modperl/product/details.cgi?pdesc=Drywave_Air_Dryer&r=view&i=71503&aID=). You can leave the battery in the boat, but hook it up to a float charger all winter.

Cloaked
09-23-2007, 02:55 PM
I have a 94 205 that will be stored in a heated garage. I will add fuel stabilizer (sea foam or stabil) and change the oil.
Is there anything else that I should do to the boat?

Thanks,
Jeffhttp://batterytender.com/product_info.php?products_id=2&osCsid=fc85f70122307eda8f5a20886441c1e8

You can get these cheaper at a distributor. This is the corporate site with MSRP. I found them at $45 each. If your battery isn't working properly, you're going nowhere. Especially if it dies on the water next spring.

The Battery Tender and the electronic ignition (conversion kit) are the two best investments in my boat bay.

I run mine in the driveway with a hose feeding water in the tranny cooler. Run it as long as you like. Once it's warm and the theromstat is open, I remove the hose, and add about 2 gal of 50/50 antifreeze / coolant solution in the same opening. You'll see the (pink) color of the solution coming out the exhaust. Done deal.


See ya'll another time.

.

TMCNo1
09-23-2007, 03:57 PM
http://batterytender.com/product_info.php?products_id=2&osCsid=fc85f70122307eda8f5a20886441c1e8

You can get these cheaper at a distributor. This is the corporate site with MSRP. I found them at $45 each. If your battery isn't working properly, you're going nowhere. Especially if it dies on the water next spring.

The Battery Tender and the electronic ignition (conversion kit) are the two best investments in my boat bay.




I totally agree! The battery tender is the best thing for batteries I've even see or used! Advance Auto, Auto Zone, Speed Shops., Motorcycle Shops, among others carry them for around $49.95 + tax, but I got mine from Eckler Corvette for $50 when a friend bought 3 for his toys.

JimN
09-23-2007, 05:20 PM
"Once it's warm and the theromstat is open, I remove the hose, and add about 2 gal of 50/50 antifreeze / coolant solution in the same opening. You'll see the (pink) color of the solution coming out the exhaust. Done deal."

You know that the thermostat closes as soon as the cold RV juice hits it, right? Do you pull one of the block plugs to make sure that what's in the motor is pink? I wouldn't stop at 2 gallons and usually drain the block before introducing the anti-freeze. That way, I know it's going to be pink when I check it. RV juice is what, $2 a gallon? If it was mine, I would use 3-5 gallons. 50/50? Is the pink RV juice being diluted before putting it in the motor? Sorry, but if it is, that's just being cheap. Compared with cracking a motor or manifold, a few gallons of anti-freeze is good insurance.

Cloaked
09-23-2007, 05:29 PM
"Once it's warm and the theromstat is open, I remove the hose, and add about 2 gal of 50/50 antifreeze / coolant solution in the same opening. You'll see the (pink) color of the solution coming out the exhaust. Done deal."

You know that the thermostat closes as soon as the cold RV juice hits it, right? Do you pull one of the block plugs to make sure that what's in the motor is pink? I wouldn't stop at 2 gallons and usually drain the block before introducing the anti-freeze. That way, I know it's going to be pink when I check it. RV juice is what, $2 a gallon? If it was mine, I would use 3-5 gallons. 50/50? Is the pink RV juice being diluted before putting it in the motor? Sorry, but if it is, that's just being cheap. Compared with cracking a motor or manifold, a few gallons of anti-freeze is good insurance.Been doing it for 29 years. Thermosat does not close with ambient temp solution.

I know, you're the expert....

Cheap is in the eye of the beholder. :rolleyes:

Save the rest.

123src
09-23-2007, 06:33 PM
If you have a heater, drain the water from that as well. Few things are worse than a split heater core with that water all over your carpet.


Any pictures of how and where to drain the water from the heater core? I have an insulated attached garage that got into the low 40's last year after a couple of days where the outside temp was in the teens. I drain the water out of the block, but do not know how to drain the heater core! I want to be as safe as possible......

92 Prostar 205

bigmac
09-23-2007, 06:57 PM
There should be a double-ended barbed fitting in one of your heater hoses lying in the bilge. Just loosen one of the hose clamps and pull the hose off of that fitting. Then you can just blow into it, or otherwise pressurize it with air, or you can use a pump like this (http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/rv-pumps-water/rv-winterizing-pump.htm) to pump RV antifreeze through the core.

http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/rv-pumps-water/hand-pump-kit.jpg

Or, you can use the Prestone Flush 'n Fill kit (http://www.prestone.com/images/wtbResized/prestoneAccessories2.jpg) and install a flushing T fitting inline on one or both hoses.

http://www.prestone.com/images/wtbResized/prestoneAccessories2.jpg

JohnnyB
09-23-2007, 07:10 PM
In thinking about it, if the T-Stat closed as soon as ambient hit it, it would be closed all the time because of the coolness of the lake water, wouldn't it? The block should store enough heat to keep it open.

In winterizing, I get my engine to operating temp, drain the block and then connect and run 6gal of RV antifreeze. There is enough water in the block to dilute it and I want it full strength as it gets to -35F here in the dead of winter. I do pull all the drains again and make sure I see pink coming out of all of them and store it drained and dry.....the RV antifreeze just makes sure that any residual water in the block doesn't freeze.

André
09-23-2007, 07:48 PM
Is the thermostat at the end of the cooling process?
If so,the block should be full of antifreeze even if the thermostat is close? Right...or wrong?:confused:

JimN
09-23-2007, 08:08 PM
Sporty- I just saw that you're in Eastern TN, which makes a big difference compared with WI. I was going from experience when people wouldn't bring their boats in until late in the year, not people who winterize when it's still warm. If the anti-freeze goes in when the air temperature is still decent, you're right, it won't close.

bigmac
09-23-2007, 08:57 PM
Is the thermostat at the end of the cooling process?
If so,the block should be full of antifreeze even if the thermostat is close? Right...or wrong?:confused:


http://mccollister.info/cooling diagram.jpg

André
09-23-2007, 09:01 PM
http://mccollister.info/cooling diagram.jpg
Thank you Dr.!;)

east tx skier
09-23-2007, 09:45 PM
I'd change the transmission fluid, too. Don't forget to disconnect the hoses at the low ends and spin the engine over with the kill switch pulled to get the water out of the pump housing.

ride
09-24-2007, 01:11 AM
Couple of things to check... If yours is an LT-1, I've read of some conflict between antifreeze and the aluminum head (JimN, Enginenut??). As for removing all water from the block, IIRC, in the mid '90's my former dealer used to pull my impeller and dry-run it (closely monitoring the block temp) with all hose ends disconnected/block drains removed to heat the block up and steam out any remaining moisture. I've never done this as the fear of overheating is a bit more risk than I like to bite off on and don't know that I'd recommend doing it yourself, but it does sound like a logical solution to remove all moisture.
I'd also think fogging the engine won't hurt. Also, remember to mind your battery...

Jesus_Freak
09-24-2007, 05:50 AM
Been doing it for 29 years. Thermosat does not close with ambient temp solution.

I know, you're the expert....

Cheap is in the eye of the beholder. :rolleyes:

Save the rest.

Since I cannot PM you, let me ask you here where you are located in TN?

hacker
09-28-2007, 04:35 PM
Yes, drain the water out of the block. What happens if the heat goes out?

While I understand this point, I choose not to drain my block (in my heated garage). The reason I insulated and heated the garage, was to have the boat available for a mid winter ski run. I just can't envision a scenario that I couldn't get the block and heater core drained in time if I did lose power.

ride
09-28-2007, 06:12 PM
While I understand this point, I choose not to drain my block (in my heated garage). The reason I insulated and heated the garage, was to have the boat available for a mid winter ski run. I just can't envision a scenario that I couldn't get the block and heater core drained in time if I did lose power.

Had a buddy that felt this same way till he went home for x-mas vacation one year. Luckily, all that he had to replce was his short block. Can't even imagine how he felt to come home and see one of his freeze plugs rolling on its side on the bottom of his bilge with another pushed half-way out... He was depressed to say the least.:o However, if you're taking mid-winter runs, maybe you don't worry too much about a hard freeze like we do. I'll put it this way, they hold Ice Fishing derbies on our ski reservoir in January...

bigmac
09-28-2007, 06:59 PM
Draining the block and manifolds is about a 5 minute job. Add a flushing "T" connnector to one of the heater lines and you've got a boat that's no longer hostage to the reliability of one's local power company.

krakolos
10-01-2007, 01:15 PM
Hi,

I inspected the trans cooler intake and discovered weeds inside. Took them out.

I suspect that the pick-up underneath the hull is maybe missing a part or screening of some kind. I will check that out.

I am lucky, cause if that was to completely clog during operation I would run out of water and you know what happens then.....

I ski in shallow water 4.5 to 6.0 of water only at the end of the summer the weeds get cut by the props and float around so I guess that is why we vacuum them up the intake.

Good day to everyone from Canada

JimN
10-01-2007, 01:29 PM
It's possible that part of the grate is missing but when you're running, the suction is pretty high and weeds are easily drawn in.

It's a good idea to check the oil cooler at least once a week, preferably more. It's not a hard job and I have found that a 5/16" socket on a 1/4" drive ratchet is about the quickest for working with hose clamps, especially with wet hands.