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View Full Version : got towed in yesterday


rick s.
09-10-2007, 04:51 PM
Found out that it only takes about a second to wind 60 feet of wakeboard line around the prop. What a mess! I should have taken a picture after the boat was put on the trailer, but it was dark...

88 PS190
09-10-2007, 05:33 PM
ya... i've never done it myself,

I've seen others do it. And i've had to yell to the boat driver before to shut the engine off when I see them doing it.

Really its pretty hard to run over your own rope. Make it a habit to coil the rope when you are changing riders/skiers. Don't just leave it out or you will drift by it and forget.

rick s.
09-10-2007, 05:58 PM
normally i'm really anal about this but this time i made a u turn to pick up a rider and while picking up the rider we were blown over the rope and the rest is history. Forgot to check where the rope was and wrapped it up.

Ric
09-10-2007, 06:28 PM
twice others driving my boats have done this in the past. never had the privelege of doing it myself :rolleyes:

take the platform off, pull the deadman switch on the dashpanel, get a decent knife and go to town on it. You can clean the twisted rope from the prop without being towed home. whoever drives over it, owes you 80 bucks though

KnoxX2
09-10-2007, 06:33 PM
twice others driving my boats have done this in the past. never had the privelege of doing it myself :rolleyes:

take the platform off, pull the deadman switch on the dashpanel, get a decent knife and go to town on it. You can clean the twisted rope from the prop without being towed home. whoever drives over it, owes you 80 bucks though

Good point!!!!!!!!!!!!!:rolleyes:

Have not done this myself yet!!!

tex
09-10-2007, 06:33 PM
I always keep a cheap mask, good knife, and wire cutters in my boat. The wife seems to get one rope a year.

88 PS190
09-10-2007, 06:40 PM
tie a length of rope to your knife. so you don't drop it.

TMCNo1
09-10-2007, 08:00 PM
Over 30 years of boating/skiing, and never ran over a rope. We always coil up the rope immediately after returning to the skier after every set or skier change to untwist, check for knots, etc.

ProTour X9
09-10-2007, 08:16 PM
We also keep a good (and extremely sharp) knife in the boat, but normally don't use it for the prop, because a family friend stabbed himself in the forehead doing that same thing.

But, it happens to EVERYONE:wavey: , sooner or later, especially on a windy day. Trust me IT WILL:firejump:

Leroy
09-10-2007, 08:20 PM
A rigging knife is good to cut the rope if needed and you can use the point for opening up knots.

JohnE
09-10-2007, 08:43 PM
I've never wrapped the rope around the prop, but Monica did last year. Good times trying to cut it (I did have a sharp knife - and was very conscious of the possibility of cutting myself) with lightning coming our way. We were trying to get in one last run before the storm.

Maristar210
09-10-2007, 09:16 PM
I suppose it certainly can happen but if the observer and driver both are paying attention it never should. I have had the same rope for three years, knock on wood.

JohnE
09-10-2007, 09:26 PM
I suppose it certainly can happen but if the observer and driver both are patying attention it never should. I have had the same rope for three years, knock on wood.

My driver and observer were paying attention.

To everything but the rope. Year and a half and counting on the current rope, though.:)

tex
09-10-2007, 09:36 PM
I've got ropes that I use on every ski day and are over 10 years old. I've had ropes only make it 1 trip to the lake. It's all karma!

Maristar210
09-10-2007, 09:39 PM
My driver and observer were paying attention.

To everything but the rope. Year and a half and counting on the current rope, though.:)


It could happen to any of you / us. I'm just happy to be still in my posession of my rope :cool:

That'll probably be changing now :rolleyes:

rektek
09-11-2007, 12:00 AM
it is amazing how fast a rope vanishes when wrapped around a prop.
happened 1 time with a tube rope.

dive mask and razor blade knife got us going within minutes.

Jet
09-11-2007, 08:34 AM
Happened to me

When tubing, no spotter and 3 people on the tube, the rope got caught under and got stuck. Good thing, my dealer had required me to buy a diving knife and mask to keep on the boat at all times. Water was pretty rough though so it took me about 25 minutes and a few bumps on the head before we were able to get on our way.

That saved us from a tow.

tex
09-11-2007, 11:41 AM
I've seen a driver run over Pyramid ropes. 12 ropes, bridels and all. Had to pull the boat and it took forever to cut them out.

chudson
09-11-2007, 12:44 PM
Happened to me one time, my buddy was doin a deep water start off the back with a regular ski rope and I took off, he submarined I was watching him in the mirror and he let go and I saw the rope barreling in on us(that rope looked like it had been shot out of a cannon). His wife was sitting next to me and as I give her a quick forearm push away I went to the right and the rope handle went between us. We both sat up and started laughing then I remembered the rope was out in front and before I could stop we was wrapped up in the prop. That had never happened before but I put an old butchers knife and swim goggles next to the drivers seat after that!!!

edit: by the way got a bunch of nice tie ropes for the dock out of the deal!

SoCalBrew
09-11-2007, 01:10 PM
I think a good multi tool is - with pliers and a knife - is a must on a boat ... the pliers are invaluable in helping get a rope out... sometimes you don't even need the knife... and you saved yourself $80.

I find that it is a lot easier to drift over the rope with my MC then it was with any other Deep V that I've had in the past... Been boating for over 35 years... and sliced thru my first rope a few months back... very embarrassing.

rick s.
09-11-2007, 01:34 PM
First time for me, guess I owe myself $80. We were in the Delta, water clarity sucked, could only see about 1 foot. No mask. Dull knife. Pull, hack, & slash. At least the water was warm so that wasn't an issue. It was about 6pm.

I cut a piece of the line off and tied it to my knife and to my shorts so I wouldn't lose it. No pliers / vice grips / multi-tool onboard. So now I'm going to have all of these available.

Knowing I had a buddy close probably made me a bit lazy, but it all worked out in the end and probably (maybe?) taught my wife and kids a lesson about why getting the rope out of the water is important! and I shouldnt have to ask them each time to pull the rope in.

The delta sloughs are narrow, but usually great water. I'm equally concerned about some wally cutting too close to me and picking up my rope in his prop rather than my running over my own rope.

It'll (probably) never happen again.

Ric
09-11-2007, 02:37 PM
HHAHAH that reminds me, my ski partner is a skinny dude and he ran over my rope at our ski lake and he caught it quick so I told him just jump in and unwind it and we will check it out. In the water, he started shivvering so much he couldnt get his hands to work! ahahha (its funny now) so I had to jump in anyway and my fatass did not shiver (water upper 70s late fall action). so I bidged the entire time and told him I saved him 80 bucks! :purplaugh:
(spared the rope though! he bumped into gear and we could hear the vibration and I yelled kill it kill it! and he did before it wound so tight that we'd need a knife)

Sodar
09-11-2007, 02:57 PM
HHAHAH that reminds me, my ski partner is a skinny dude and he ran over my rope at our ski lake and he caught it quick so I told him just jump in and unwind it and we will check it out. In the water, he started shivvering so much he couldnt get his hands to work! ahahha (its funny now)

I have been there! The first season I had my '96, I ran over the rope. It was EARLY spring (early March). It was at the river, so we were getting close to being pushed into some rocks, so I threw an anchor out, while I tried to get the rope out, but with the 3 mph current rolling by, it was soooo cold! Never forget that one! No knife needed though! Saved the rope and skiied with it until this past Spring!

beatle78
09-11-2007, 02:58 PM
I did it once when I got my BU. Caught it quick, but it was October in NE and my brother and cousin took turns diving in to unwrap it. Took about 15 minutes. (rope saved)

Then I did it once this year with a tuber rope. Caught it quick. Took about 5 minutes to unwrap it.(rope saved)

GOOD TIMES!!!!!........

atlfootr
09-11-2007, 10:55 PM
take the platform off, pull the deadman switch on the dashpanel, get a decent knife and go to town on it.
You can clean the twisted rope from the prop without being towed home.Forget the above ...
Hold breath, dive down (tarzan style) w/ knife in mouth and cut the damn rope while in the water :rolleyes:

SoCalBrew
09-11-2007, 11:04 PM
Goggles or a mask and snorkle DO help with this situation... but, I hate to waste the space on things that won't get used.

Archimedes
06-21-2010, 01:30 PM
Reviving an old thread to ask a question. Wifey and I reversed over the rope on our last run this weekend when then kids had just finished tubing. Miscommunication about rope in or out. We're anal about this stuff and it's the first time we've done this in about 20 years of boating.

Boat was in reverse and I cut the motor within a second of the wrap, but the prop did stop turning. We were in a narrow cut with rock walls, so I threw on the Goggles and went under to unwrap it. Took me about 6-7 times to get it all off and the last two wraps were jammed on the prop shaft and I had to tug them out.

Wondering if I could have done any damage to the propshaft, tranny, vdrive, etc. from the rope stopping the prop in reverse at idle speed. We checked the boat out after that and it seemed to run fine, threw the kids on the tube for one more run and everything seemed fine but then, in very rough water, I seemed to get what felt like cavitation where the boat slowed and vibrated, so I pulled them in. Then we rode around testing starts, reverse, everything and the boat seemed fine, save for one short time I felt what I though was an odd vibration that went away. Rough water, 9 people in the boat. Any chance of damage from wrapping a rope like that? I can't believe it's good for the boat to stop the prop with the engine running, but it was literally about a second or less before I shut it down. My wife went from 'rope's fine' to 'rope!!!' and I immediately knew what she meant.

TallRedRider
06-21-2010, 03:21 PM
Reviving an old thread to ask a question. Wifey and I reversed over the rope on our last run this weekend when then kids had just finished tubing. Miscommunication about rope in or out. We're anal about this stuff and it's the first time we've done this in about 20 years of boating.

Boat was in reverse and I cut the motor within a second of the wrap, but the prop did stop turning. We were in a narrow cut with rock walls, so I threw on the Goggles and went under to unwrap it. Took me about 6-7 times to get it all off and the last two wraps were jammed on the prop shaft and I had to tug them out.

Wondering if I could have done any damage to the propshaft, tranny, vdrive, etc. from the rope stopping the prop in reverse at idle speed. We checked the boat out after that and it seemed to run fine, threw the kids on the tube for one more run and everything seemed fine but then, in very rough water, I seemed to get what felt like cavitation where the boat slowed and vibrated, so I pulled them in. Then we rode around testing starts, reverse, everything and the boat seemed fine, save for one short time I felt what I though was an odd vibration that went away. Rough water, 9 people in the boat. Any chance of damage from wrapping a rope like that? I can't believe it's good for the boat to stop the prop with the engine running, but it was literally about a second or less before I shut it down. My wife went from 'rope's fine' to 'rope!!!' and I immediately knew what she meant.


I had the prop nut back up when I ran over a tube rope last year in reverse. I wonder if the initial shake you felt was the prop recentering itself on the shaft with a slightly loose nut?

Doesn't fully make sense, but you didn't mention tightening the nut, so I thought that would be one other thing to check.

kkkeating
06-21-2010, 03:42 PM
Was on a boat out at Catalina Island where the prop got tangled with a mooring line. In a manner of seconds the line wrapped itself along two feet of shaft and due to the friction the rope melted/fused itself together such that it was one piece of plastic wrapped around the shaft. Didn’t know rope could melt underwater but it did. Took a diver with tanks and a hacksaw 20 minutes to remove the mess!

Two years ago got our line tangled in the prop; didn’t realize it until the line tightened up between the tower and prop and killed the engine, and what a sound that made!

Archimedes
06-21-2010, 03:45 PM
Was on a boat out at Catalina Island where the prop got tangled with a mooring line. In a manner of seconds the line wrapped itself along two feet of shaft and due to the friction the rope melted/fused itself together such that it was one piece of plastic wrapped around the shaft. Didnít know rope could melt underwater but it did. Took a diver with tanks and a hacksaw 20 minutes to remove the mess!

Two years ago got our line tangled in the prop; didnít realize it until the line tightened up between the tower and prop and killed the engine, and what a sound that made!

Did you have any damage when you killed the engine? Sounds similar to my situation, but I don't think it fully killed the engine. I heard the clunk of the prop stopping and killed the motor instantly.

kkkeating
06-21-2010, 04:00 PM
No damage to the engine or prop and it killed the engine immediately with a big “clunk”. Was able to pull from the top of the boat most of the rope off, but about 12 inches remained intertwined around the prop blades. This 12” of rope sure change the prop characteristics; no vibration, but would only allow the boat to go up to twenty MPH. Once I remove this short section of rope everything went back to normal.

Archimedes
06-21-2010, 04:05 PM
Thanks. I definitely think I'm over thinking this but my boat's in today to get the oil bath hubs repaired so I'm having the check everything out anyway. Aside from one instance, which could have been water related, the boat ran like a top after the incident. Man I hate tubing...

Bellinghamster
06-24-2010, 02:30 AM
I've heard stories of powerboats getting their mooring lines caught up in the prop and winching the strut right out of the bottom of the boat, causing a quick sink. Doh!

FrankSchwab
06-24-2010, 02:39 AM
Unless the rope got caught in the cutlass bearing and caused an issue, it's unlikely you did any damage, IMHO.

/frank

wheelerd
06-24-2010, 03:32 AM
Last year I drifted over my rope and did the deed. Fortunately I was close to shore and when a friendly lakeside resident saw my predicament he waved me over. He had a brand new SN which he lowered off his lift, backed out, and moored to his dock. We maneuvered my boat onto his lift and he found me a knife. Within minutes the whole mess was gone.

T-Rager
06-24-2010, 04:27 AM
A treaty with local Indians allows them to gill net salmon on Lake Sammamish several days each year. During one of these times, I launched my ProStar 190 at 5:30 a.m. as it was just getting light. My ski partner and I slowly wove our way around 8 gill nets that were each about 100 yards long, placed parallel to each other and were interdigitated so that their ends overlapped by about 20 yards. Once through this maze, we idled for about half a mile and, finding no more nets, I got in the water and started skiing.

After about four turns, I noticed that I had passed the boat, which was dead in the water behind me. I swam back to the boat and my partner pointed out the gill net extending outward from both sides of the boat. I dove under the boat and found the top line of the net, along with about six floats, tightly wrapped up in the prop, with one float wedged between the prop and the rudder.

There was no way to unwrap this mess and we didn't have a knife. Moreover, members of the tribe, who were camped in the launch area, were starting to stir. Fortunately, another skier spotted us (and the net) and loaned us a knife.

After about 20 minutes of work, I had decimated about 20 feet of net and my boat was free. In spite of the fact that the boat was traveling 36 mph when it snagged the net and that the subsequent rope wrap killed the engine, the engine started and there appeared to be no damage (prop looked and felt OK and no vibrations were evident). We finished our sets and quietly trailered the boat under the watchful eyes of the net setters.