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airdrew99
08-09-2007, 10:25 PM
In my new house, my '91 Prostar 190 trailer drags going up one of the driveways. I drive up it at a sharp angle as the trailer wheels start to enter the driveway. I thinking about putting taller shackles on the rear side of the leaf springs. Has anyone tried this on a MasterCraft trailer? I know on some old mustangs we have, we lifted them with no problem with some taller shackles made from 3/8" steel. I know that I can't lift it too high without having to change the flexible brake line at the axle. I would like to lift the lower section (prop guard) about 2". Does anyone know how much taller the shackle should be to get 2" of lift in the back?

east tx skier
08-09-2007, 11:14 PM
I had 2" custom fabricated steel blocks put over my axle, then had it aligned, before the guy welded the pins in place. That, with about a 2.5" drop at the ball mount was enough to get me up the hill with no scrape if I had the angle right. With a 5.5" drop hitch, the angle becomes less important, but I have to change the hitch.

I think different leaf springs would be an easier way to go, but my trailer rides very well (I never noticed a difference).

I possibly could have also gone with a bigger tire with the room I got at the wheel well.

http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j262/dnortonames/MasterCraft%20Pro%20Star%20205%20For%20Sale/TrailerLift.jpg

I also think the easiest bang for the buck is the drop hitch (or some poly drag wheels).

Jesus_Freak
08-10-2007, 04:37 AM
Yes, I need something as well. Tell me about these poly drag wheels, or is there good info already here? This is the first time I began looking for something about trailer lifting.

hester
08-10-2007, 06:07 AM
Here is what I did to get some lift and it has worked well and was cheap. My local trailer shop wanted the trailer without the boat to do the work and that was not an option. And what they wanted to do was not easily reversible if I had too much lift.

This is probably not the perfect solution but I wanted something I could do at home in small increments. I ordered custom 10" ubolts from springworks.com and bought tie plates from northern tool. The plates I ordered were 1/4 inch thick so I had a pretty good idea how much lift I would get.

The only setback is that there is a plate (with a hole in it) welded on top of the axel for the leaf spring nut on the bottom of the spring. This is to keep the leaf in place and not allow it to move around. When using the tie pates there is obviously no nut to keep things in place. To fix this I cut a 1" section out of one of the old leaf spring bolts (the ones used to connect the leaf to the frame). I dropped this piece down through the center hole of the tie plates to make sure I was centered before tightening things up.

So far the plates have not shifted but during the off season I plan on having the plates welded together and incorporate some sort of nipple on the bottom. Iíll admit I was a little worried when I first took it on the road but it has held up perfectly after 750 miles during the last three months, 200 of which where on a very tight, steep, bumpy mountain road.

hester
08-10-2007, 06:12 AM
One thing I forgot to mention is that with the 2 inch lift I can add a larger wheel/tire combo which would allow me to eliminate the drop hitch and keep the boat as level as possible while towing.

91ps190
08-10-2007, 06:23 AM
Why not just buy a block style lift kit made for leaf springs for jacking up trucks? It should be simple to install and should have the hole on one side and a pin on the other side and come with the u-bolts. I want to do the same thing but haven't had time and didn't know how much lift. But I was thinking 2".

91ps190
08-10-2007, 06:26 AM
Hester,would flipping your axle would probably be to much lift?

TMCNo1
08-10-2007, 07:14 AM
Due to a increase in tire diameter and to assure I had no rub problem, I had new shackles made 3/8" thick, not 1/4" and increased the shackle hole spacing by 1 1/2". While I was at it, I replaced all the spring bolts with new ones and greased it all up good with Lubramatic Marine Anti Corrosion and Wheel Bearing Grease.

TMCNo1
08-10-2007, 07:17 AM
Hester,would flipping your axle would probably be to much lift?
Flipping it over would screw up the axle geometry and move the plate on the axle that prevents the axle from sliding forward or backwards under stress and load.

hester
08-10-2007, 08:45 AM
Why not just buy a block style lift kit made for leaf springs for jacking up trucks?

That is the first place I looked but quickly realized that all the truck/auto kits I had access to did not match up well to the odd sized (2x3 rectangle) mc axle.

Flipping the axel would have put me up five or more inches and I only needed 2-3. Plus what No1 said.

91ps190
08-10-2007, 09:45 AM
I guess nothing is easy then!!!

TMCNo1
08-10-2007, 10:41 AM
One thing I did find out when I installed longer shackles on my trailer was, the loop on the end of the spring that the stock shackles bolt to, was rubbing the factory welded horseshoe that the factory shackles bolt to on the trailer, causing an annoying squeek. The longer shackles separated the spring loop and the horseshoe and the squeek went away,:twocents:

Jesus_Freak
08-10-2007, 01:28 PM
A friend who builds trailers in the Nashville area is suggesting I go with longer shackles. He is telling me to steer clear of the block/plate lift methods. Doesnt sound like ETS or hester is having any problem with theirs...

airdrew99
08-10-2007, 04:01 PM
Installing taller shackles is cheap and easy. I'm in the process of installing mine right now.

Jesus_Freak
08-10-2007, 08:55 PM
Installing taller shackles is cheap and easy. I'm in the process of installing mine right now.

I have been quoted a number just shy of $100 for the complete hardware set, including springs, ubolts, and straps. Is that reasonable?

TMCNo1
08-10-2007, 09:29 PM
I have been quoted a number just shy of $100 for the complete hardware set, including springs, ubolts, and straps. Is that reasonable?
6 new trailer spring bolts, nuts, flat washers, lock washers and 4 custom made shackles per my drawing, from a local utility trailer builder was $40 and I thought that was reasonable 8 years ago.

jimmer2880
08-13-2007, 08:24 AM
I have been quoted a number just shy of $100 for the complete hardware set, including springs, ubolts, and straps. Is that reasonable?

For $200.00, you can get a brand-new straight axle (without the 2-3" drop that is built into the MC axles).

My axle needs to be "aligned" anyway, so when I finally do something, it's a no-brainer for me... I'm going with the new axle.

With the shackles, remember that you only get 1/2 of the added shackle lift. A 2" longer shackle will only supply 1" of lift.

Jesus_Freak
09-05-2007, 03:47 AM
I ended up getting the springs and all the hardware from a trailer parts dealer known as UFP out of Winchester, TN. They have phenomenal customer service. Because my original springs were so non-standard (dont have any idea why), the new springs geometry has lifted nearly 3 inches for far less than $100.

jixxxer
04-16-2009, 01:49 PM
Are the shackles the part the the springs mout to??

Jesus_Freak
04-16-2009, 01:55 PM
Are the shackles the part the the springs mout to??

See below...

jixxxer
04-16-2009, 02:21 PM
I dont get how that raises the trailer?

TMCNo1
04-16-2009, 02:35 PM
Are the shackles the part the the springs mout to??
I dont get how that raises the trailer?

In this picture, see the two rusty looking plates each side of the black spring @ the orange jack stand on the left side of the pic, with a bolt going thru them on the trailer and to the black spring rear loop? Those are called spring shackles and if the shackles are longer and the bolts are farther apart it will raise the trailer.
46226

sp00ky
08-18-2013, 07:27 PM
Here is what I did to get some lift and it has worked well and was cheap. My local trailer shop wanted the trailer without the boat to do the work and that was not an option. And what they wanted to do was not easily reversible if I had too much lift.

This is probably not the perfect solution but I wanted something I could do at home in small increments. I ordered custom 10" ubolts from springworks.com and bought tie plates from northern tool. The plates I ordered were 1/4 inch thick so I had a pretty good idea how much lift I would get.

The only setback is that there is a plate (with a hole in it) welded on top of the axel for the leaf spring nut on the bottom of the spring. This is to keep the leaf in place and not allow it to move around. When using the tie pates there is obviously no nut to keep things in place. To fix this I cut a 1" section out of one of the old leaf spring bolts (the ones used to connect the leaf to the frame). I dropped this piece down through the center hole of the tie plates to make sure I was centered before tightening things up.

So far the plates have not shifted but during the off season I plan on having the plates welded together and incorporate some sort of nipple on the bottom. Iíll admit I was a little worried when I first took it on the road but it has held up perfectly after 750 miles during the last three months, 200 of which where on a very tight, steep, bumpy mountain road.

I know this is an old thread, but does anyone know if this solution stood the test of time?