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kadams949
08-03-2007, 06:35 PM
I have a 2004 X-7 and I'm in the process of purchasing tower speakers for it. I would like to be able to turn off the tower speakers when not needed and only use the speakers in the boat.

Does anyone know how to wire one of the accessory switches to turn the tower speakers on and off?

I am assuming that I could run the remote on/off wire from the amp to the switch, then to the stereo, but I'm not sure if that will work.

Any help would be much appreciated.

jcmcmahon
08-03-2007, 07:53 PM
I just use the fader. I have the audio out on the headunit seperated between amps, and an cancel either the in boat or tower speakers out.

Archimedes
08-03-2007, 08:00 PM
What he said. You gotta split between two amps. I use one 6 channel and I can fade between the cockpit and the tower, but the bow speakers stay on all the time.

06' X-2 R8R H8R
08-03-2007, 09:26 PM
Ditto that which was allready said.......FADER

boofer
08-05-2007, 10:32 PM
I think that this is not such a bad idea. Being able to turn the tower speakers ON and OFF with a single switch could come in handy. Does anyone see any reason not to do it this way?

JimN
08-05-2007, 10:51 PM
If the speakers will be on their own amp, you can use a switch to allow continuity for the amp turn-on lead specifically for that amp. If you're using the same amp for all speakers, you really want to do the switching when the volume is down since some amps don't like sudden impedance changes. The fader method does work well.

Another way is to use a 4 pole, double throw relay for each pair. Oddly enough, Radio Shack sells them and I have used many for switching speaker and pre-amp level signals in cars, trucks and boats. You can use it to turn one pair on, toggle between two pairs or toggle between one pair and both in series (parallel will probably puke the amp unless it's made for low Z speaker loads).

onewheat
08-06-2007, 01:51 AM
If the speakers will be on their own amp, you can use a switch to allow continuity for the amp turn-on lead specifically for that amp. If you're using the same amp for all speakers, you really want to do the switching when the volume is down since some amps don't like sudden impedance changes. The fader method does work well.

What JimN said is right. Are you using 1 amp or two (with 1 being a dedicated tower speaker amp)?

boofer
08-06-2007, 08:46 PM
I just happened on to this post the other day and it made me think. I have yet to install tower speakers but I want to in the near future. Right now, I have the stock setup; head unit powering the 4 component speakers and 1 amp powering the kick panel subwoofer. My thoughts lie along installing the tower speakers with only one additional amp (4-channel). I was thinking it would be nice to shut down the tower speakers when they are not needed without having to fumble through the audio menus for the fader control. More information will be appreciated.

PS
JimN, my other post about the purpose of the ACC1 switch has nothing to do with this post. I was just curious about it's purpose.

JimN
08-06-2007, 08:59 PM
From my earlier post, "If the speakers will be on their own amp, you can use a switch to allow continuity for the amp turn-on lead specifically for that amp."

Each amp has a terminal for the blue turn-on wire and if you run the turn-on lead for the tower amp to a switch, turning the switch off will shut the amp off. It's a low current 12Vdc circuit and the head unit shouldn't have any trouble driving two turn-on circuits but if you use more than two amps, you should probably use a relay to handle it.

SteveO
08-07-2007, 10:42 AM
The shop that did my stereo put a RCA in-line control that controlled the volume level for the amp that drove the tower speakers. It basically took the RCA outputs from the head units came into the controller and then had outputs that went to the amp. I highly suggest the tower volume control AND a sub level control to be able to fine tune on the fly.

fintek9
08-07-2007, 11:31 AM
I routed mine through an "EQ" to be able to use the fader off of it.
It also brought more sound control into my system. love the sound it produces!

kadams949
08-08-2007, 06:21 PM
From my earlier post, "If the speakers will be on their own amp, you can use a switch to allow continuity for the amp turn-on lead specifically for that amp."

Each amp has a terminal for the blue turn-on wire and if you run the turn-on lead for the tower amp to a switch, turning the switch off will shut the amp off. It's a low current 12Vdc circuit and the head unit shouldn't have any trouble driving two turn-on circuits but if you use more than two amps, you should probably use a relay to handle it.


Thanks for the helpful comments. I had planned on running two amps...the stock setup with a 4-channel running the sub and cockpit speakers and another 4-channel to run the tower speakers. Would you have to run the turn-on wire from the tower speaker amp to the switch to the headunit or would you just end with the switch?

victorff
08-08-2007, 06:41 PM
I have a dedicated amp for the tower speakers and have the option to power the amp on or off with the use of one of the switches. It's a great set-up.

JimN
08-08-2007, 11:42 PM
kadams- if you use a separate switch, it allows you to turn the tower speakers off without affecting the others.

justinlkgb
08-09-2007, 12:29 AM
I just use a simple switch, running to the red wire. 8p
Has LED Red light, drilled hole in fiberglass by my knee, works great, just cant have volume up and hit the switch or else amp kicks out.

FYI, the ACC switch on my boat could not handle the amps, rated @5 and I needed a 30amp.

JimN
08-09-2007, 01:03 AM
What red wire is powered by the switch- the main power lead for the amp? That's why the switch melted- the main power lead carries a lot more current that the switch is made for. All 12V audio amps have a turn-on terminal and it's a low current circuit. Running the main power lead through anything adds resistance, raises the current needed to develop full power (assuming the output will stay the same and the voltage decreases) and increases the likelihood of problems. Switch the turn-on lead, nothing else.

As I have said in other posts, if a switch can't handle a lot of current, use it to trigger a relay and use that to carry the current. It's easy to do and the circuit diagram is on the relay case. If you need help with it, a diagram can be provided.

Also, you need a fuse at the battery for the main power lead. If you don't have one and the wires melt or are cut and short to ground, you will have a fire. All of the battery's cold cranking amps will try to go through the short-circuit and there's no way a small wire will carry 600-800 CCA without generating a lot of heat. The amp's main power and ground wires go directly to the battery, not through the dash wiring and switch. The amp will not live long that way, neither will the wiring.

It's sometimes called "letting the smoke out of the wires", but it happens so fast that nothing can be done to stop it.

justinlkgb
08-09-2007, 01:57 PM
I see. This makes total sense once I thought about it after reading your post. I will look at the switch to see what I have hooked up. I hope it is the remote. :o :o

ONe question, where did you get the relay at? What Amperage? got a picture????

JimN
08-09-2007, 02:05 PM
The relay shouldn't be used on the heavy, main power lead, only on accessories that draw more than the switch can handle and as I said, running an amp through a relay or switch is asking for trouble. The remote circuit is low current draw. There's no way it will kill a 5A switch unless there's a short to ground and the voltage it's supplying doesn't come from the head unit. If it was only switching the head unit's turn-on voltage, the head unit's turn-on output would stop as soon as the short occurred.