PDA

View Full Version : Brake Help..


TheOneandOnly
07-14-2007, 07:22 PM
I have a 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee and did a brake job on it a couple months ago. I blead the lines since one line needed to be replaced. Now when we drive it I notice the brake petal needs to be pressed down about 1/2-3/4 the way before it starts to stop. It seemed to be like this in the past but I need it to be fixed before I decide to tow. Any help/suggestions on what to do would be appreciated.

TheOneandOnly
07-14-2007, 07:30 PM
Also have to say the brake pads are only a year old and have alot of pad (look almost new) left

TMCNo1
07-14-2007, 07:36 PM
I always like those brake shop chains that offer a "Lifetime" warranty. Problems or questions, they fix it no questions asked, just like mufflers if you have the paperwork!

WTRSK1R
07-14-2007, 08:47 PM
Sounds like you may still have some air in the line that you are compressing as you start to push the pedal down. When you finally feel it start to stop, is the pedal solid, or sort of spongy?

Spongy = air in the lines.

Chicago190
07-14-2007, 08:56 PM
Yeah I agree I would bleed the brakes first.

TheOneandOnly
07-14-2007, 09:15 PM
Sounds like you may still have some air in the line that you are compressing as you start to push the pedal down. When you finally feel it start to stop, is the pedal solid, or sort of spongy?

Spongy = air in the lines.

Seems a little spongy. What is the best way to bleed? I just opened the cap on the master cylindar then went to each cabiler in a clockwise formation. Should I have the Master Cylinar cap closed when doing this? what is the best way? Thanks

Maristar210
07-14-2007, 10:25 PM
air in the lies if all else is well.....

TMCNo1
07-14-2007, 10:36 PM
Seems a little spongy. What is the best way to bleed? I just opened the cap on the master cylindar then went to each cabiler in a clockwise formation. Should I have the Master Cylinar cap closed when doing this? what is the best way? Thanks
Did you have someone pump the brakes while you bleed each wheel. It is not necessary to replace the mastercylinder cover while bleeding, but you can if you want to, but you will have to remove it again to top it off once the bleeding is complete.

Chicago190
07-14-2007, 10:54 PM
To bleed brakes start with the brake furthest from the master cylinder and work towards it. Usually this will be passenger side rear, drivers side rear, pass. side front, and drivers side front. Run a length of clear plastic tubing from the bleeder valve into a bottle filled with a little bit of brake fluid. This way as you pump air isn't sucked back up, only fluid. Then open up the bleeder valve and start pumping the pedal. Wait for new fluid and all air bubbles to leave the system, which is why its nice to use clear tubing. After 5 pumps or so have the person pumping keep the pedal down as you tighten the bleeder. Also make sure not to let the master cylinder run dry because then you'll have to start all over. I've also heard of people using brake fluid that is a different color (some company makes blue fluid) so that it is easy to tell when all old fluid is out.

TheOneandOnly
07-14-2007, 11:06 PM
To bleed brakes start with the brake furthest from the master cylinder and work towards it. Usually this will be passenger side rear, drivers side rear, pass. side front, and drivers side front. Run a length of clear plastic tubing from the bleeder valve into a bottle filled with a little bit of brake fluid. This way as you pump air isn't sucked back up, only fluid. Then open up the bleeder valve and start pumping the pedal. Wait for new fluid and all air bubbles to leave the system, which is why its nice to use clear tubing. After 5 pumps or so have the person pumping keep the pedal down as you tighten the bleeder. Also make sure not to let the master cylinder run dry because then you'll have to start all over. I've also heard of people using brake fluid that is a different color (some company makes blue fluid) so that it is easy to tell when all old fluid is out.

Oh shoot that is probably why since when I had my gf pump and hold the pedal down I noticed it was hard to keep air from going back in. I noticed at the store they sell some kind of tubing kit for bleeding which it looks like im going to have to go get.
:rolleyes:
I have had a few cars before that seemed to have brakes like this. Is it true to say that all cars should be touchy to the pedal if all air is out of the lines and the brake pads are new?

Chicago190
07-15-2007, 01:26 AM
Oh shoot that is probably why since when I had my gf pump and hold the pedal down I noticed it was hard to keep air from going back in. I noticed at the store they sell some kind of tubing kit for bleeding which it looks like im going to have to go get.
:rolleyes:
I have had a few cars before that seemed to have brakes like this. Is it true to say that all cars should be touchy to the pedal if all air is out of the lines and the brake pads are new?

No, some cars just have mushy brake pedals no matter what you do. For example my family has a Subaru Forester and the brake pedal is soft and has no feeling. If you wanted to you could replace the soft brake lines that run to the caliper with steel braided brake lines, but its pretty unnecessary unless you use your tow vehicle for autocross or road racing :rolleyes:

What the auto store was selling is probably something like this http://www.mityvac.com/pages/products_bcbe.asp They suck the fluid out so you can bleed brakes by yourself. Nice to have if you need to bleed brakes a lot, but the old fashioned way works fine for the average person. All you need is to go to the hardware store and get a foot long length of clear tubing that is the same size as the bleeder valve's nipple. Then just keep the other end submerged in fluid and so as the pedal comes up during the pumping, it will suck fluid up instead of air.

Workin' 4 Toys
07-15-2007, 01:43 AM
I noticed at the store they sell some kind of tubing kit for bleeding which it looks like im going to have to go get.
I hope this "kit" isn't just a cup with a clear piece of hose so you can see the fluid....If it's anything more than a $3.00 "kit" make your own.
You need to close the bleeder BEFORE the pedal is lifted, better yet if it can be closed before the pedal is all the way down to the floor.
And yes, the cover is better kept on the master. Getting brake fluid on ANYTHING is not good.

TMCNo1
07-15-2007, 08:20 AM
Here is one option among other available from most any auto parts stores, http://www.tooldesk.com/products/productDetail.aspx+id+986
There is even one site that has replacement bleeder valves with a check valve to prevent air from returning into the lines, http://www.speedbleeder.com/

TheOneandOnly
07-15-2007, 11:53 AM
I hope this "kit" isn't just a cup with a clear piece of hose so you can see the fluid....If it's anything more than a $3.00 "kit" make your own.
You need to close the bleeder BEFORE the pedal is lifted, better yet if it can be closed before the pedal is all the way down to the floor.
And yes, the cover is better kept on the master. Getting brake fluid on ANYTHING is not good.

I think its around 10.00 not too bad

Chicago190
07-15-2007, 01:03 PM
Here is one option among other available from most any auto parts stores, http://www.tooldesk.com/products/productDetail.aspx+id+986
There is even one site that has replacement bleeder valves with a check valve to prevent air from returning into the lines, http://www.speedbleeder.com/

I'm a fan of speed bleeders. I have them on my 1995 M3 and they work great.

TheOneandOnly
07-15-2007, 03:36 PM
When bleeding the brakes do you need to usually go back to the first tire that was bleed more than once (i.e. after bleeding the passenger side rear and going to the driver side rear, passenger front then driver front--do I need to re-go thru it again since air could may be got in another line or are all lines seperate?)

Chicago190
07-15-2007, 04:45 PM
When bleeding the brakes do you need to usually go back to the first tire that was bleed more than once (i.e. after bleeding the passenger side rear and going to the driver side rear, passenger front then driver front--do I need to re-go thru it again since air could may be got in another line or are all lines seperate?)

You only need to bleed each brake once, each line is seperate.

Scot
07-15-2007, 04:56 PM
If you have drum brakes in the rear, you might need to check and see if you need to adjust them. Over time, drum brakes do not automatically adjust themselves like the are suppose to.....

The pedal will travel as far as needed until the shoes make contact with the drum, even if there is no air in the lines at all.

If you have disc in the rear, I agree that you might want to bleed the lines.