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91ps190
06-28-2007, 09:20 PM
I have a question about dry suit. I have read that you must put on the dry suit carefully. Can someone explain this? Thanks

WTRSK1R
06-28-2007, 09:26 PM
Most drysuits have Latex seals for the wrist, ankles, and neck. The seals are very tight to keep the water out, and if you are not careful putting it on, you can tear the seals. They make lubricant to make them slide on a bit easier, but you still need to be careful.

Hope this helps.

tex
06-28-2007, 09:28 PM
Baby powder helps. I just point my toes and pull very evenly. Don't reach your fingers underneth and pull hard. Most important...don't let anybody else wear it. I still wear mine...I bought it in 1992 and have worn it in a show for 2 years in Germany. It has seen it's day and still rocks. It's all about how you take care of it. Did I mention that you should never let somebody else wear it? At least you will know who to blame if a seal gets blown. Also buy AquaSeal! It works great on seams!

Doug G
06-28-2007, 09:48 PM
If the water is that damn cold get out the snowboard or sled.:rolleyes:

J/K. I know you guys like to extend the season and not everyone lives in warm climates like those riding with gators guys. Rule of thumb for me, if the driver and third need cold weather gear ... it ain't botin' weather

WTRSK1R
06-28-2007, 10:38 PM
I ski from April to November. In April the water is usually in the 40's. We have adapted a rule of 100. So in spring, when the water is in the 40's, it needs to be close to 60 air temp to break out the boat. In fall, when the water is still dropping from the summer highs, we may ski when the air is in the 30's and the water is in the 60's. There is definately sweat shirts and sometimes winter coats on the boat. My boat has both a heater and a shower. I do not own a dry suit, but you can warm up plenty quick with a wet suit filled with hot water from the shower. In fact, you stay pretty comfortable even in the cold air temps with the wet suit on. Now changing...:eek: that's another story.

bigmac
06-29-2007, 07:23 AM
Dry suits are great. They do indeed extend the season and are great on those semi-nice fall or spring days where the air temp is moderate but the water is in the 50's (although we have been skiing while there was blowing snow - THAT is a uniques experience). They're about as easy to put on as a wet suit, but you don't have to get undressed in the boat, and you don't have to be wet when you take it off then get redressed in something warm. Best of all, they avoid that 90-second shock of cold water when you first get in. And they do allow you to ski or whatever at a time when there are no other boats on the lake.

You do have to be a little careful with the seals. The BFI suit that I have has heavier seals than normal. They're very robust, but they are tight and harder to put on. Talcum powder helps, but talcum powder all over the boat is problematic, so I use some silicone spray or oil on the hands and wrists, ankles so they slide on easier. After using it, I spray the seals down with some 303 protectant and bees wax the zipper.

CoFooter
06-29-2007, 11:28 AM
I have a BFI suit as well. Great suit, but was a pain in the A** to get on and off because of the thicker rubber on the seals. I use KY Jelly on the seals and they slip right on and off. Safe for Latex obviously and water soluable.

bigmac
06-29-2007, 11:34 AM
I have a BFI suit as well. Great suit, but was a pain in the A** to get on and off because of the thicker rubber on the seals. I use KY Jelly on the seals and they slip right on and off. Safe for Latex obviously and water soluable.KY - good ideal. Eastie and UMP would suggest Astroglide.

Flatwaterfooter
06-29-2007, 11:43 AM
Storage of the suit is important also so the seals do not dry out.

91ps190
06-29-2007, 02:04 PM
Thanks for info guys. One more question - lifejacket inside or outside the suit?

TMCNo1
06-29-2007, 02:17 PM
I have a BFI suit as well. Great suit, but was a pain in the A** to get on and off because of the thicker rubber on the seals. I use KY Jelly on the seals and they slip right on and off. Safe for Latex obviously and water soluable.
Does that make it a body condom???????8p

CoFooter
06-29-2007, 02:38 PM
Thats a good one. I was going to list all of the other things you can do with it once its on the boat, but this is a family friendly site.

thijs
06-29-2007, 02:43 PM
I find that we dont even need a lifevest. The suit traps a tonne of air, even after you try to get it all out. Before we figured this out we wore it outside the suit.

BTW- Fight the urge to pee in the suit.

atlfootr
06-29-2007, 03:05 PM
I use KY Jelly on the seals and they slip right on and off.
Safe for Latex obviously and water soluable.I once knew a girl that used that as well ... although she didn't have a drysuit :rolleyes:

dsoby
06-29-2007, 03:34 PM
It depends on the drysuit. You don't have a choice with a neopreme top. I have a baggy top and wear my vest inside. There is plenty of room and it stays dry.

06197ttlq9-footer
06-29-2007, 03:49 PM
u wont need a life jacket there is enough air traped inside to float u. I ski all year round in maryville tn( right infron of the mastercraft plant in Vonore). I recomend something from Barefoot central or Ron Scarpa watersports. I would also recoment the polar fleece jumpsuit that goes underneath the drysuit. Dont listen to the nay sayers winter sking can be the most rewarding skiing you will do all year. the lake is way less crowded. I can foot down the main chanel of our lake in january and december. To answer your first question; the seals are the most important elemement to your suit take care of them and they will take care of you. Silocone is the answer and if you want you may want to shave the hair off your ankles.

P.S. I dont ski on Easter or Christmas day. those are the only exceptions, for obvious reasons. God Bless.

Harvey
06-29-2007, 04:02 PM
If you have a baggy suit I would suggest wearing at least a comp vest on the inside. The risk that you puncture your suit is just too great for me. If it does puncture then you will be wearing a suit full of water and no floatation. Try swimming in that situation!

uawaterskier
06-29-2007, 04:10 PM
If you have a baggy suit I would suggest wearing at least a comp vest on the inside. The risk that you puncture your suit is just too great for me. If it does puncture then you will be wearing a suit full of water and no floatation. Try swimming in that situation!qft. that would be a REALLY bad situation

thijs
06-29-2007, 11:32 PM
I dont think the water would actually pull you down as it weighs the same as the water you are (or were) skiing on. Once you are partially submerged it wouldn't pull you under. Once you try to climb up/out of the water that is when it is going to be heavy.

Although I do validity in the statement that if it were punctured, the extra floatation would be lost. Thus, maybe a vest is the safer way.