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atlfootr
06-01-2007, 06:08 PM
Here's today news in Winter Haven, Fl.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070601/NEWS/706010415/1039
Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst-Case Scenario
By Diane Lacey Allen (http://javascript%3Cb%3E%3C/b%3E:NewWindow%28376,130,%27/apps/pbcs.dll/personalia?ID=diaall&category=STAFF%27%29;)
The Ledger

WEATHER NEWS
Lake Okeechobee reaches record low, threatening backup water supply for millions of South Floridians.

LAKELAND - After a dry winter and spring, the summer rainy season can't get here soon enough.

But be careful what you wish for. Rain coincides with hurricane season, which begins today.

This year's hurricane season forecast is fraught with potential for trouble. The nation's leading experts are anticipating numerous storms.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its storm forecast for the Atlantic basin last month, warning people to prepare for 13 to 17 named storms, seven to 10 hurricanes and three to five major hurricanes.

Dr. William Gray's camp in Colorado updated its forecast on Thursday with an equally active look at the season that runs through the end of November. That predication calls for 17 named storms, nine hurricanes and five that reach Category 3 strength with winds of at least 111 mph.

Despite these prolific forecasts, a new Mason-Dixon poll released Thursday says many people living in at-risk states are still not prepared.

The poll, which coincides with the start of the National Hurricane Survival Initiative, found 53 percent of the people polled in Atlantic and Gulf Coast states did not think they were vulnerable to either a tornado or a hurricane. Fifty-two percent had no family disaster plan and 61 percent had no survival kit.

As shocking as these numbers may seem - particularly in light of the new National Hurricane Center Director Bill Proenza's pleas that Floridians be self-reliant during storms - they didn't surprise Polk County Emergency Management Program Manager Paul Womble.

"We have not done any formal survey like that, but when we're out doing presentations, it's consistent with what we hear on the streets here,'' he said.

"Folks really need to be prepared,'' he said. "Hopefully, it won't happen. But if you play the odds, at some point, someone is going to come up on the short end of that stick.''

Womble said the unprecedented 2004 season, when three hurricanes roared through Polk, came after a decades-long string of uneventful hurricane seasons for the county. That season was followed by Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf coast.

Gray's group says the Gulf coast is again a prime target for a hurricane and there is a 50 percent chance a major storm could make landfall in the coastal area that includes Florida.

National, state and local officials are encouraging people in hurricane-prone locations to prepare accordingly.

In Polk County, people living in mobile homes and low-lying areas that historically flood should be ready to evacuate. Three pet-friendly shelters will be available this year so people can take pets with them.

People who have sturdy, site-built homes that are not at risk for flooding should plan to hunker down and ride out a storm unless they are told to leave. That means stocking up on supplies and taking responsibility for your family.


"It seems to be consistent, folks are not prepared and don't think it's going to happen to them,'' Womble said. "It takes a few minutes - have some extra canned goods. Those basic things. It's not difficult, not something that takes a lot of time or effort.''

Emergency management officials recommend families have enough food and water on hand for at least three days. But because power is an issue after a storm, experts like Proenza think Floridians should be resilient enough to fend for themselves for up to two weeks.

"It's not about (being) comfortable," Womble said. "It's about being able to survive and just being able to take care of the basics."

Material from The Associated Press was used in this report.


CINDY SKOP/THE LEDGER
The canal that leads to Lake Mirror from Lake Cannon in Winter Haven, seen here this week, cannot be navigated by boat because of extremely low water levels.

brianaw26
06-01-2007, 06:27 PM
damn thats crazy... Last year the lakes in dallas were 10-15ft low... After the rains over the last few months they are 1-3 ft high.... Its amazing what a little rain can do..

Who woulda thought.... Florida lacking rain.

TMCNo1
06-01-2007, 10:41 PM
Press was used in this report.


CINDY SKOP/THE LEDGER
The canal that leads to Lake Mirror from Lake Cannon in Winter Haven, seen here this week, cannot be navigated by boat because of extremely low water levels.


We've been thru that canal many times! 6'+ deep usually!:eek: :eek: :eek:

Leroy
06-02-2007, 01:44 AM
The lakes are full, but we are very dry in Indianapolis area....except for the little bit of rain that came for race day!

atlfootr
06-02-2007, 02:44 PM
We've been thru that canal many times! 6'+ deep usually!:eek: :eek: :eek:It's now more like 6" today :(