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NSXBill
05-30-2007, 09:42 AM
I just got an HD TV and already have Dish but want to get the best value. Want HD, locals, and no pay movie channels. Right now I pay $58 for 200 channels, plus local and no HD or pay movies. Adding HD will tack on $20 and force me to pay a monthly DVR charge plus $5 for each box. Right now my deal has no charge for boxes or DVR. Thinking of trying Direct or Comcast (my local cable).

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Bill

dmayer84
05-30-2007, 09:46 AM
I know that my local cable company doesnt charge extra for an HD box instead of a standard box. I have verizon fios for tv and the hd box is 10 vs 5 for the standard.

JimN
05-30-2007, 10:09 AM
If you don't want to get burned for discontinuing Dish and want more time to think about which one to get, use the composite video input. It'll still look good but not as good as component video. I'm not a big fan of HDMI, so you won't see me recommend that. If the audio is going to a receiver and surround speakers, you don't need to have that go to the TV, anyway and that's one thing HDMI fans like, but I see no need for. To me, the plug is too long and that puts excessive stress on the device's jack, which leads to failure of connections and makes falling out likely. They also have "handshake" issues. Plus, the HDMI cables are more expensive than they need to be.

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 10:27 AM
If you don't want to get burned for discontinuing Dish and want more time to think about which one to get, use the composite video input. It'll still look good but not as good as component video. I'm not a big fan of HDMI, so you won't see me recommend that. If the audio is going to a receiver and surround speakers, you don't need to have that go to the TV, anyway and that's one thing HDMI fans like, but I see no need for. To me, the plug is too long and that puts excessive stress on the device's jack, which leads to failure of connections and makes falling out likely. They also have "handshake" issues. Plus, the HDMI cables are more expensive than they need to be.

Hi Jim,

Thanks for the reply. My Dish box has no composite jacks, just RCA component. My progressive scan DVD player has composite jacks as well as the component+S-video. I have component going from box to DVD and S-video going to tv. I don't want to buy composite-will buy HDMI instead.

The whole point is that I do not have HD service now and am looking at which service to go with to get it. I thought I was looking forward to the HDMI, supposedly best HD, and not so bad price on Amazon, etc.

Getting HD box from Dish will increase my montly by $20+6+5= $31 or ~$90 total :eek:

JimN
05-30-2007, 10:38 AM
If the jacks are red/white/yellow, that's composite video. Component breaks the picture into it's basic color components, which are red, green and blue . RGB component is the primary color set for light, while red, blue and yellow are the primary colors for physical media, like paint.

I don't have a HD TV right now but I have one HD DirecTV receiver, which feeds my TV from the composite video output. The picture is a lot better than cable, the sound is better, I like the channel lineup more and it costs less. No pay channels but I got tired of them repeating the same programming, anyway. I have a customer with a really nice 42" plasma and the picture on the non-HD cable channels is total crap. A few look good but most are terrible. HD channels look fine.

JimN
05-30-2007, 10:50 AM
You're going backward in signal quality by sending the picture to the set via S-video.

FYI- the order of video quality is for consumer equipment (not computer), highest quality at the top:

1) HDMI/Component
2) DVI
3) (supposedly) S-Video (because it separates the chroma from the luminance)
4) Composite video
5) RF modulated

HDMI remains in the digital domain until it reaches the input of the display and whether that module is in the display chassis or not, doesn't matter much. It is then separated into it's color components, which is the same as being sent from a source to the display as a component video signal.

DVI is another protocol and uses a computer-style connector, which is held in place with screws. A much more durable connection and should have been used instead on the HDMI connector.

S-Video remains a mystery to me. Good theory but I have yet to see a better picture from this than composite. I could use S-Video but after trying it with several cables, composite won out and I have wired literally hundreds of systems using composite and component video with good results.

RF modulated is only for those situations where running more cable is impossible, not practical or the display doesn't have any other inputs.

east tx skier
05-30-2007, 11:06 AM
I just got an HD TV and already have Dish but want to get the best value. Want HD, locals, and no pay movie channels. Right now I pay $58 for 200 channels, plus local and no HD or pay movies. Adding HD will tack on $20 and force me to pay a monthly DVR charge plus $5 for each box. Right now my deal has no charge for boxes or DVR. Thinking of trying Direct or Comcast (my local cable).

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Bill

How are you not charged per box. I get charged $5 per even for the one I own. Upgrading to two DVRs today (four receivers total). Am not charged for DVR service because I have the "everything package."

Jim, I find it interesting that Svideo doesn't look better to you than composite. I'm in the boat of not being impressed with the HD lineup and only having the option of composite or Svideo. I've usually opted for Svideo simply because I'd heard it was an improvement. I've always thought it looked great (or at least good enough). I've proceeded to throw money at more channels since then.

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 11:10 AM
[QUOTE=JimN]You're going backward in signal quality by sending the picture to the set via S-video.

FYI- the order of video quality is for consumer equipment (not computer), highest quality at the top:

1) HDMI/Component
2) DVI
3) (supposedly) S-Video (because it separates the chroma from the luminance)
4) Composite video
5) RF modulated

...
Jim, I had component and composite backwards. My Dish box has COMPOSITE going to DVD and then Composite audio plus S-video going to the tv. This supposedly gives better DVD signal to tv. Still not as good as component. HDMI is only for HD as far as I know, but component is good for 480p progressive scan DVD.

My dish box has no COMPONENT jacks (or even S-video), because it is not HD, so have to use COMPOSITE jacks.

Now what do I go with?

atlfootr
05-30-2007, 11:12 AM
I never had either, always cable!
In fact, I gave my two satillite dishes to a friend.

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 11:12 AM
How are you not charged per box. I get charged $5 per even for the one I own. Upgrading to two DVRs today (four receivers total). Am not charged for DVR service because I have the "everything package."
Hmm, my bill is not broken down. Perhaps I am being charged. Sneaky bastards.

Are you talking Dish?

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 11:14 AM
Here's what I'm really after if I stay with Dish:

I have Dish. Got 4-room deal (two receivers, one is the hated early DVR (301 and 501?)) probably 4 or more years ago. They used splitters or reflectors on the coax cables to enable two tvs to see signal from each box. This required a lot of coax wiring (in different directions than standard cable would run). Paying $58 in ATL for 200 channels, plus locals and no pay channels.

Now I want HD plus I have to have DVR. They offer what you guys seem to think is an OK DVR box that will power two tv's on different channels. But I still require 4 tv's total, even if can only view two signals. The reflector/splitter scheme will not work with my HD setup, correct?

Do I get to keep my old equipment? Didn't buy, but have never had to pay rent either.

Should I go for the two-tv HD DVR and use my other two receivers to power the other two tv's? The head on the Dish 500 antenna has only two receiver points. I also have a separate Dish 500 antenna they put in for free several years ago because of some lawsuit about not getting one PBS channel plus another channel, so have two dishes pointing in different directions. Very confusing.

I asked reps if I could keep equip, and they said "probably." Not a very good warm and fuzzy there...

If I keep other two receivers, will I have to pay for service for them? Like $5 each or what? Can I buy stuff and install myself to save and make this work (like new multi-receiver heads and/or dishes). Used stuff available? I'm not afraid of major project to save bucks.

Bill

djhuff
05-30-2007, 11:19 AM
Call dish and talk to them. Someone is trying to screw you. I've got the top tier package, with the movie pak, and HBO, Cinemax. I didn't get Voom, but I have all the other HD channels, and locals, and a 2 tuner DVR, as well as 2 other boxes and I'm just barely at $100.

The DVR is expensive though (it was last year anyway). Right now, Dish has better PQ on their HD channels, but that may change when Direct gets their new sat in the air.

I thoroughly despise the cable company and will never have them attached to my house ever again. They are a group of total morons that can't do anything right.

mitch
05-30-2007, 11:20 AM
Hey Bill, Check this thread. If your HD TV has an internal HD tuner, why not just add an HD antenna. I get PBS, abc,nbc, cbs, and Fox in HD for free. Since this thread I've added a 2nd antenna (same one) for my gameroom HD TV. I've had good luck w/ them and the pic is awesome and did I mention the HD feed is FREE. Drawback is no prem chans, but it's does not sound like you care. Good luck!!

http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=5859&highlight=antenna

mitch
05-30-2007, 11:23 AM
Oh and check here to see what HD chans you would get.

www.antennaweb.org

djhuff
05-30-2007, 11:25 AM
I have the box you are speaking of, and there are outlets galore on the back. TV1 has component and DVI outs, as well as R&L audio and Coax digital (I think it has a standard coax out as well a the composite outs). TV2 has Coax out set to a certain channel, and composite outs (yellow, red, white).

With that said, you can hook up 4 tvs to that one box without having to use any kind of splitter (but that's alot of wiring).

Don't install it yourself, I tried and it was like pulling teeth to get them to let me do it, plus they will upgrade your LNB too. Wire your TVs up yourself though.

djhuff
05-30-2007, 11:26 AM
On the off air antenna, you can hook one up to the Dish DVR and it adds an extra record channel. I can record 3 things at once now as long as one of them is off air.

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 11:31 AM
Hey Bill, Check this thread. If your HD TV has an internal HD tuner, why not just add an HD antenna. I get PBS, abc,nbc, cbs, and Fox in HD for free. Since this thread I've added a 2nd antenna (same one) for my gameroom HD TV. I've had good luck w/ them and the pic is awesome and did I mention the HD feed is FREE. Drawback is no prem chans, but it's does not sound like you care. Good luck!!

http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=5859&highlight=antenna
Thanks,

Gotta have ESPNHD and do want DiscoveryHD, etc, so have to pay for HD anyway. Just don't want or need to pay for movies.

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 11:34 AM
I have the box you are speaking of, and there are outlets galore on the back. TV1 has component and DVI outs, as well as R&L audio and Coax digital (I think it has a standard coax out as well a the composite outs). TV2 has Coax out set to a certain channel, and composite outs (yellow, red, white).

With that said, you can hook up 4 tvs to that one box without having to use any kind of splitter (but that's alot of wiring).

Don't install it yourself, I tried and it was like pulling teeth to get them to let me do it, plus they will upgrade your LNB too. Wire your TVs up yourself though.
Hmm, I think I have a different box, but you do raise an interesting point. I guess with a new double tuner Dish HD DVR, I could hook up more than just two tv's?...

What is LNB?

east tx skier
05-30-2007, 11:35 AM
LNB is the little doohicky on the end of the stick (the two eyes that point back at the dish).

http://www.sat-sales.com/prodimages/dish_network_dishpro_plus_lnb.jpg

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 11:36 AM
On the off air antenna, you can hook one up to the Dish DVR and it adds an extra record channel. I can record 3 things at once now as long as one of them is off air.
This is a good tip. Record Fox or CBS HD football while recording/watching something else.

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 11:37 AM
LNB is the little doohicky on the end of the stick (the two eyes that point back at the dish).


Ok, now, I'm learnin'........

JimN
05-30-2007, 11:38 AM
As I said, if you want to take your time to get the best deal, use composite until you get an HD box. If the S-Video works for you, use that.

You can send 1080 through component too, so don't rule it out as the way you send all of the signal to the TV. When I set up systems, I use the receiver for all source switching and it usually has up-conversion, unless there's some reason an additional input to the TV is needed, like occasional A/V use or the display can be used as a computer monitor. On occasion, cable TV needs a composite feed because the picture is so bad via component (like the one I'm working with now).

If there's no receiver, the TV will be doing the switching but you could probably buy a half-way decent receiver with the money saved by not buying all of the cabling and it's a lot easier to run a couple of wires through a wall's stud space than a whole big bundle.

Video quality and HD lineup are two completely different issues and before HD, Springsteen had a song about cable TV called '57 Channels and nothing's on'. HDNET has some good shows, but it depends on what you watch, I don't watch much from the big three networks, mainly the newer ones and educational channels.

The Simpsons is one exception.

JimN
05-30-2007, 11:42 AM
NSXBill- You can hook up as many TVs as you want, with the right accessories. The part you want is called a multi-switch and some have only a few inputs while others have a lot. The number of inputs is determined by the number of LNBs and the number of outputs will depend on how many TVs you want to feed.

LNB is what was/is called LNA (Low Noise Amplifier) with C-Band sat equipment.

east tx skier
05-30-2007, 11:43 AM
I'd use component, but my sat receiver doesn't offer that option. Maybe the new one I get today will. But since it's an SD receiver, I doubt I'll be so lucky. We shall see. On our big screen, we do the switching at the receiver---that is, svideo from the receiver to the tv/monitor, and everything else into the receiver. The receiver's no spring chicken though, so I'm wondering if I could do better, i.e., component from my dvd player direct to the TV (no component option on the receiver).

east tx skier
05-30-2007, 11:45 AM
NSXBill- You can hook up as many TVs as you want, with the right accessories. The part you want is called a multi-switch and some have only a few inputs while others have a lot. The number of inputs is determined by the number of LNBs and the number of outputs will depend on how many TVs you want to feed.

LNB is what was/is called LNA (Low Noise Amplifier) with C-Band sat equipment.

Check to see which LNB you have. If you've been a customer for a while (as I have), you may have a legacy stystem (even if you're using Dish Pro receivers). If that's the case, you'll probably have to upgrade the LNB to run the multiswitch. But if you're running more than four receivers, you've probably already had that upgrade.

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 11:50 AM
Check to see which LNB you have. If you've been a customer for a while (as I have), you may have a legacy stystem (even if you're using Dish Pro receivers). If that's the case, you'll probably have to upgrade the LNB to run the multiswitch. But if you're running more than four receivers, you've probably already had that upgrade.
No, I'm only running 2 receivers now. How do I check?

east tx skier
05-30-2007, 11:54 AM
Can you see your dish/LNB from the ground or a window? The Dish Pro will say "DP" or "DP plus" on it. When did you get your equipment?

You may also be able to tell from looking at your system info through your menu.

Here's a link (http://www.dbsinstall.com/Dish_network/dishnetwork.asp) for everything you wanted to know about Dish Network Equipment (past and present). The one on switches and LNBs is particularly enlightening.

I'm getting an upgrade today, so I may have some spare parts afterwards that I bought, but that my fear of climbing around on my roof caused me to not need.

tex
05-30-2007, 12:05 PM
Buy DLP! It will help pay my doctor bills! I have dish and I'm sitting here stuck on the coach with a bad leg. It storming like a motha and I keep losing the signal. That's the only thing that sucks about the dish!

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 12:16 PM
...Here's a link (http://www.dbsinstall.com/Dish_network/dishnetwork.asp) for everything you wanted to know about Dish Network Equipment (past and present). The one on switches and LNBs is particularly enlightening.

...
I have a Dish DVR 501 and a Dish 301. Does this mean I have pro LNB?

east tx skier
05-30-2007, 12:24 PM
I have a Dish DVR 501 and a Dish 301. Does this mean I have pro LNB?

Not necessarily. Even though the DVR 501 is a Dish Pro receiver, they are backward compatible to the Legacy series Dish/LNB. I have a 501 as well, but am running a Legacy Twin 500 LNB. The thing is, if you go dish pro, your older (non pro) receiver if the 301 is non pro, needs to be upgraded or you'll need a little adapter to make it work (they're pretty cheap on ebay). Also, with Dish Pro, the coaxial cables may need to be replaced.

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 01:33 PM
If I go with a Dish ViP622 (two tuner, one HD, two DVR) unit, can I wire four tvs to it as long as I don't mind watching the same thing at the same time on each pair? How? What would my LNB requirements be? How would they bill me... for the unit only or would I have to pay extra because I have 4 tvs hooked to it?

Bill

djhuff
05-30-2007, 03:18 PM
The best thing about the 2 tuner units is that they only bill you for the unit, not the amount of tuners that are in it. With just that one unit, there will be no more than someone with one tv.

east tx skier
05-30-2007, 03:29 PM
If I go with a Dish ViP622 (two tuner, one HD, two DVR) unit, can I wire four tvs to it as long as I don't mind watching the same thing at the same time on each pair? How? What would my LNB requirements be? How would they bill me... for the unit only or would I have to pay extra because I have 4 tvs hooked to it?

Bill

Don't know, I'm in the waiting game (outside of the 4 hour window right now). Between Dish overbooking the installer and the thunderstorms that just blew through here, I'm hoping it happens today. Did find out that I'm getting a 625 though. Off to learn about that.

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 04:09 PM
.... With just that one unit, there will be no more than someone with one tv.
Don't understand this

east tx skier
05-30-2007, 04:10 PM
He means, you get charged for 1 box just like I get charged for one box. But your 1 box will let you watch four different things on four different TVs.

NSXBill
05-30-2007, 04:37 PM
He means, you get charged for 1 box just like I get charged for one box. But your 1 box will let you watch four different things on four different TVs.
I thought you already had TWO receivers and were getting one two-tuner unit today. What are, and what will you be charged for?

Image of your DVR 625 followed by the Vip DVR 622 I may get...

Eastie, looks like the non-HD only has composite plus S-video, no Component...

HD has those, plus component and HDMI (for TV 1 only)

Now, how would I hook up 4 tvs to this thing (VIP 622)?

east tx skier
05-30-2007, 05:05 PM
I have two and am adding one with two tuners for four total tuners (3 receivers). This should mean that I will be able to access DVR'd movies on 3 tvs in the house (although the two DVRs will have different things on them). I'll be charged for 3 receivers. My DVR fees are waived because I order lots of channels.

JimN
05-30-2007, 06:25 PM
"but that my fear of climbing around on my roof caused me to not need."

What's the matter Beave, chicken?

Doug- if you want to run the component video to the TV from the DVD, it will definitely look better but remember, std def DVD players are only 480.

Leroy
05-30-2007, 06:37 PM
S-video will get rid of dot crawl and give you better resolution than composite.

TX.X-30 fan
05-30-2007, 07:54 PM
"but that my fear of climbing around on my roof caused me to not need."

What's the matter Beave, chicken?

Doug- if you want to run the component video to the TV from the DVD, it will definitely look better but remember, std def DVD players are only 480.


From your posts in this thread I now realize That you also know more about home theater than I do, along with every other thread I have read your postings in. :mad: :D

What I use to determine the best cables for a video source is the native resolution of the source. For my projector (720p) I run component, I could use HDMI but why I don't need 5.1,6.1 going to my projector. Anyway I see no difference in video quality with DVI-HDMI vs component and possibly not as good as high quality component.
I do not switch through my processor, my thoughts on that are it just adds another layer of processing to the signal and opens up the opportunity for signal degradation. My projector has an internal scaler that will convert anything that it sees to its native resolution, and even though my anthem dv50 is a quality unit the projector is only concerned with video, not DD conversions and all that audio stuff.

I also have a Hd lcd for most tv viewing, I run The Hdmi only because I had one. The tv will output 1080p but where is that content to view besides BLU-RAY HD-DVD. I have seen 1080p and and I find it hard to tell the difference from 1080i, if the tv is calibrated and the viewer is the correct distance from the video source. For that matter its hard to distinguish 1080i from a quality 720p source.

I have direct tv and for the most part think its among the best. With that said their new hd-dvr has only TOS audio out, and for me I would much rather use RCA, much better DD and audio IMHO. :rolleyes:

JimN
05-30-2007, 08:17 PM
If you have cable or satellite, you can have 1080i on some channels. They both support all four resolutions and will usually have some kind of indication of the output format. Some TVs will show the input, too, and that makes it easy to determine what you actually need. Personally, I would wire for the highest resolution available and upcoming, just to eliminate having to re-run any cables too soon. I also like using oversized smurf tube because it's really easy to add/replace wires. Not having another layer between the source and display is the only reason I would ever run everything directly to the display and even then, if the equipment is decent, it won't be obvious that something is there.

You sure there isn't an RCA with a black ring for digital audio on your HD DVR?

Digital coax vs TOS-link makes no difference- they're both digital and until it gets to the decoder, they're exactly the same and there should be no audible difference. Also, any halfway decent coax or optical cable will be fine unless they have kinks in them or the minimum bend radius has been exceeded, which optical doesn't tolerate at all. In a rack, I'll use optical but not if it has to go through a wall, floor or anything like that. I used Planet Waves on the last job and may use it again but I kind of prefer compression or Snap-N-Seal connectors, like Liberty, F-Conn, etc. I HATE AUDIO QUEST cables and their crimpless connectors. 24 AWG center conductor is just too freakin' skinny, IMO. Analog audio/video, digital A/V and most other signals are fine going through RG-59 with the proper connector. For a cable or sat feed, I would use RG-6 or RG-6 quad shield if it's in a high RFI/EMI environment.

What is DD?

I like the A/V quality of DirecTV a lot more than Warner cable (sorry, Leroy) and have had very few interruptions due to weather. Leroy is the sat guy to talk to here since he worked for DirecTV or Hughes.

east tx skier
05-30-2007, 10:32 PM
Hahaha! I've got Dish on one line giving me a $50 credit for not showing today and the tech on the other line setting up an appointment for 9:30 a.m. sharp in the morning. Heads up their arses, but my install just got cut by 50%.

djhuff
05-31-2007, 09:19 AM
One thing I've found with any connecting cable... Go to a shop that will let you try them at home. Hook one up, then the other. If you can't tell a difference between the two, go with the cheaper one. All that matters is what you can see/hear. If the $200 cable doesn't sound any better than the $50 cable (to you), then why waste the money for someone elses enjoyment??

NSXBill
05-31-2007, 09:52 AM
My solution is to replace my current Dish 301 and 501 (DVR) and get the one VIP622 and only pay one $5 receiver fee plus the $6 DVR fee (that I wasn't paying) in place of the current 2X $5 fees for my TWO receivers.

I have a need for 4 tvs to be able to view the two sources. In other words, I don't care if I can't view 4 different things at the same time - two different things is fine as long as I can put a pair of tvs on each source.

Now, how would I hook up 4 tvs to this thing (Dish DVR VIP 622)? I posted pic of inputs above. I plan to use the HDMI for TV 1 which will leave the composite jacks for TV 1 open. Can I simply hook them to another tv to view the same source at the same time? Will it work? Will it degrade the signal?

How about for the pair of TV 2's? Splitter on Composite jacks??

Thanks,

Bill

JimN
05-31-2007, 09:53 AM
90% of what is said about the "life altering" sound of audio cables is BS. I know they make a difference but when you actually look at some of them, they're about $10 worth of parts, high profit and a lot of hype. Audio Quest has one that retails for $4900/pair and IIRC, they're 2M long. No, I didn't leave the decimal out of the price.

I have sold and installed audio equipment for close to 30 years and one of the worst parts of it is dealing with people who come up with words to describe sound that have absolutely nothing to do with sound at all. Calling the sound 'chocolatey' is ridiculous and I have heard it called exactly that. I'm not trying to hit the "Brown Note", I'm trying to listen to some music. Spacious, good imaging, good soundstage and some of the terms are fine and I have no problem with an accurate sound description but some of it is insane. The ones that really bug me say that they want it to sound "just like the studio". No, they don't. A studio is not set up to listen to music in the same way as a living room or home theater and I would guess that 99% have never been in a studio. If they were, there was no music playing. Also, studios don't use big bucks "these cables will change your life" marketing successes. They use a lot of wire, cables, connectors and equipment that most people have never heard of, but meet their specifications and sound the way they want. If a cable goes bad in a studio, a lot of times, they'll basically tell their lackey, "Go down to Radio Shack (or music store) and get me an xyz cable, 12' long".

There's only one way to have it sound exactly like the studio and that is to have the same pieces of equipment, in that room, with the same people, same temperature/air pressure/humidity and being in the same listening position. Now, add the fact that everyone's hearing is different. Might as well just find equipment that sounds good without obsessing about it.

JimN
05-31-2007, 10:00 AM
NSX- you can use both at the same time and when they're different outputs, like HDMI and composite or component, they don't affect each other at all unless there's a bad problem. You can use a "Y" cord if you want it to feed two TVs but a lot of receivers have two sets of output jacks, anyway. If you get to the point of needing to feed a lot more TVs, a distribution amplifier is needed, which will work for audio and video. You can get them for modulated RF signal, composite, component, DVI or HDMI and they can have analog, S/PDIF or TOS-Link digital audio. If you shop around, you can get one pretty reasonably, depending on what kind oif signal you want to send.

You don't want to use a splitter on composite signal.

NSXBill
05-31-2007, 10:11 AM
NSX- you can use both at the same time and when they're different outputs, like HDMI and composite or component, they don't affect each other at all unless there's a bad problem. You can use a "Y" cord if you want it to feed two TVs ........

You don't want to use a splitter on composite signal.
So, for TV 1 outputs, I'll use the HDMI for HD and the Composite jacks to go to the second tv on the same source.

Question 1 - what cable do I run to this second tv? It has composite jacks and coax jack only. I want to run composite to composite, so do I need to run a new cable through house with red-white-yellow RCA jacks on each end? Or is there some other way like converting composite to coax and then back again so as to be able to use existing cable to second tv?

Question 2 - For the SD tv outputs for TV 2 outputs, how do I split the composite output? You said to use a "Y" but then said you can't use a splitter on composite?

Thanks

JimN
05-31-2007, 10:22 AM
If you need to run coax to the TV and demodulate it there, you might as well use the 'TO TV' coax output on the sat receiver. That way, you don't buy more extra parts that are redundant.:D There won't be any improvement if you modulate it, run A/V cables and demodulate it at the TV. If you can run cables easily, R+L audio and composite video is better because it eliminates two steps in the signal chain (mod/demod).

A splitter is not the same as a "Y" cord. A "Y" cord is just two pieces of cable joined at one point, while a splitter is two little transformers (baluns) that are used to make sure the RF signal strength is consistent at all terminations and maintains the proper impedance for the modulated output. This is important with composite or component, too and that's why a distribution amp is needed if you have to feed a lot more TVs. There's an indication on the splitter at each fitting of how much loss is caused by the splitter, e.g., 3db, 7db, etc.

NSXBill
05-31-2007, 10:35 AM
Look here http://www.dishnetwork.com/downloads/pdf/product_brochures/ViP622_ProductSheet_HighRes.pdf

There doesn't appear to be a "TO TV" coax output for either TV1 or TV2.

JimN
05-31-2007, 10:46 AM
Zoom in on the pdf and look at the 'Home Distribution" jack, with the yellow ring. That can be set to any channel, from 1-69 (called TV1/TV2 agile modulated output). Agile just means that it's able to be set to specific channels but they seem to have labeled the connections for installers, not customers.

Sorry, "TO TV" is what DirecTV and most cable boxes show.

NSXBill
05-31-2007, 10:50 AM
Zoom in on the pdf and look at the 'Home Distribution" jack, with the yellow ring. That can be set to any channel, from 1-69 (called TV1/TV2 agile modulated output). Agile just means that it's able to be set to specific channels but they seem to have labeled the connections for installers, not customers.

Sorry, "TO TV" is what DirecTV and most cable boxes show.
How does one go about "Setting" this? Is this for consumer or installer?

JimN
05-31-2007, 10:52 AM
I think customer service just says, "RTFM" (that's what they tell me, anyway). It should be in the index.

east tx skier
05-31-2007, 10:58 AM
Jim, "Chocolatey" sound = "Rich and creamy." ;)