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gtink
05-29-2007, 03:51 PM
I called MC dealer today, WaterSports Central in Buford Ga. @ Lake Lanier, Nice guys and very quick to get the data on my question.

However, I need some real world results.

Question posed:
I asked if it was ok to tow my MasterCraft X-30 2003 W/ MCX behind a Cruiser for long distances.

So everyone understands this is not a onetime event. To set the picture, my twin brother and his wife, own a Sea-Ray 330. My wife, 10 month daughter, and I join them as we cruise to our "perfect spot on Lanier".

Itís more fun to ride and share stories together, and allow Ashley "10 month daughter" to look around as we pass other boaters in the large open part of the lake that gets rough on the weekends. So we end up towing my MCX at about 4-5 knots to our desired location. Usually takes about 1 hour to arrive.

This past weekend, I jumped in my boat to straighten the rudder and noticed a small noise from the engine compartment. I opened it and noticed that the transmission was making the noise. Well as I am sure you all guessed; the prop is turning over at a slow rate of speed.

So, since this discovery we stopped towing it and we both drive separate to our location.

Question:
Do any of you have any experience with this type of towing? Will the transmission get damaged by turning over from the prop and NOT the motor?

Why do I ask? In most automatic transmission autos, the transmission pump only works when the motor is running... You can damage your cars transmission if you pull it without a extra pump or disconnecting the universal joint on the axle to the transmission.

Watersports Central informed me that they called masterCraft, and were told that itís ok to pull it at very slow speeds for short distances.

To be very honest, that sounds like "I don't really know answer". Otherwise, I would expect a speed and a distance value before damage will occur. So, if you have any contacts let me know. If you know the answer, then that would be GREAT as well.

As a engineer, I feel confident that a firm answer exist. Question is; who has it. :)

Thanks all, and have a GREAT summer. I know I am.

Ric
05-29-2007, 03:54 PM
Is quickly removing the prop, out of the question?

east tx skier
05-29-2007, 03:57 PM
I think Rod used to pull his behind his houseboat. Has he been online today?

Sodar
05-29-2007, 04:00 PM
I have wondered this before when houseboating, but have been reassured under the "everyone with an inboard does it" clause!!! I know that on our old ocean boat, the transmissions had a lock-out lever, that would lock the shafts, in case you had to limp home on one engine. I did however once see a guy who used a tie-down from the prop to the strut, which prohibited the shaft from spinning... overkill??? I do not know...

bucky
05-29-2007, 04:02 PM
According to a U-haul instruction manual and my jeep owner's manual, you need to stop flat towing a car and start the engine every 400 miles, to circulate lubricant to protect the rear seal. That's 6-8 hours at highway speed.

Edit: My prop is so tight (the packing?) that I have a hard time turning it. I'd probably have to tow it up on plane to get it to turn. Sounds like I might need an adjustment.

TMCNo1
05-29-2007, 04:03 PM
As long as it is in neutral there should not be a problem for a short period of time.
What happens when you are going down the lake at 30 mph and pull the throttle back to neutral and the boat slows to a stop? The props keeps turning till there is no forward speed, right and you do that all the time.

rodltg2
05-29-2007, 04:04 PM
yeah ive towed my boat behind my houseboat but usually not that far and often. but i havent had any problem from it. the longest tow was about 3 hours when i moved my houseboat to another location. what ivwe been doing now is leaving my boat at the dock and coming back to get it with my dinghy.

rodltg2
05-29-2007, 04:08 PM
double mc tow ....

Storm861triple
05-29-2007, 04:38 PM
Question:
Do any of you have any experience with this type of towing? Will the transmission get damaged by turning over from the prop and NOT the motor?

Why do I ask? In most automatic transmission autos, the transmission pump only works when the motor is running... You can damage your cars transmission if you pull it without a extra pump or disconnecting the universal joint on the axle to the transmission.

Watersports Central informed me that they called masterCraft,....
First of all, Mastercraft won't have a clue about the answer to your question, since they don't build the trans (or the engine) and they never bother to find out the actual technical info on the sourced out parts. (try getting engine cam specs from MC lol).

Since I didn't design that tranny either, I don't know for sure but here is my answer: The answer is that it won't hurt your transmission, because UNLIKE a car's transmision, the tail shaft bearing is a roller bearing. On a car, the tailshaft bearing is actually a bushing and requires a hydrodynamic film of lubrication to function properly. There is MORE than enough lube on your roller bearings to keep that bearing happy for many, many miles (or knots).

I tow my boat at least once a year, over 75 miles on Lake Powell behind a houseboat. Been doing it for 6 years w/my boat alone, plus various other comp ski boats. That's over 450 miles of towing on my boat alone. Never had an problem w/it, and I know for SURE, that if my boat is moving in the water, my prop is turning because my drive train is as straight as a gun barrel.
Edit: My prop is so tight (the packing?) that I have a hard time turning it.
Either your packing is way WAY too tight or you're drive train is not lined up properly. I'd put money on the drive train because:
1. No direct drive boat comes w/properly aligned drivetrain no matter what the brand, and
2. I've not yet seen a DD boat w/properly aligned drive train, other than the ones that I've done myself.

To check yours you need to loosen the packing and turn the prop as a test; you should be able to turn your prop out of the water, wet OR dry, with one pinky finger. If you can't then something is wrong and it's adding friction and wear to the drive system.

-Tom

ogrover3
05-29-2007, 06:44 PM
not sure of the answer either but i was watching a wakeboard show on fuel tv the other night and noticed the guys were going to the bahamas and towing their boat behind from florida while they rode in a pretty nice cruiser.

PendO
05-29-2007, 06:53 PM
To check yours you need to loosen the packing and turn the prop as a test; you should be able to turn your prop out of the water, wet OR dry, with one pinky finger. If you can't then something is wrong and it's adding friction and wear to the drive system.

-Tom

So, if I test mine, can you tell me how to get it dialed in perfectly?

WakePowell
05-29-2007, 06:57 PM
gtink – there should not be an issue with the transmission but I would ask the manufacture, Indmar, to be sure. The main difference that you have that others don’t is the speed at which you probably tow your boat behind a SeaRay 330. Most others tow behind houseboats that travel much slower.

TMCNo1
05-29-2007, 07:18 PM
gtink – there should not be an issue with the transmission but I would ask the manufacture, Indmar, to be sure. The main difference that you have that others don’t is the speed at which you probably tow your boat behind a SeaRay 330. Most others tow behind houseboats that travel much slower.


Indmar does not manufacture the transmission, Hurtz does and are mounted to the engine @ Indmar.

WakePowell
05-30-2007, 08:27 AM
"Indmar does not manufacture the transmission, Hurtz does and are mounted to the engine @ Indmar."

I agree but the warranty is through Indmar.

Workin' 4 Toys
05-30-2007, 08:48 AM
double mc tow ....
TJ........Awesome pic Rod.:D ..........TJ off....

Storm861triple
05-30-2007, 09:37 AM
So, if I test mine, can you tell me how to get it dialed in perfectly?
I sure can! :)

Start by reading these two threads and then if you have any more questions, I'd be happy to answer them!

http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=24631&postcount=6

jclose8
05-30-2007, 10:00 AM
just to be on the safe side, what about this idea? While the boat is on the trailer, make a loop of bungee cord the correct size to go around the rudder and one blade of the prop. When you are getting ready to tow for a long distance, swim down and put it in place. That would be easy to do and should keep the prop from spinning.

chudson
05-30-2007, 10:02 AM
How about securing the prop with a cinch strap, say wrap a strap around the prop and the shaft support and tighten a little or around the rudder and tighten a little just to prevent prop rotation!!!

So jclose8 and I were typing at the same time so, yeah ditto what jclose8 said up above!!!

JDK
05-30-2007, 11:04 AM
I tow my boat at least once a year, over 75 miles on Lake Powell behind a houseboat.
-Tom

Be careful ....... very, very careful. There's TONS of pictures on Hotboat of ski/board boats that have completely swamped/sunk as a result of being towed behind houseboats on Lake Powell.
Don't forget that when under tow, ski boats don't 'nose up' like they do when under power. This lets lake rollers and big boat wakes come over the bow of the towed boat VERY easily. I think houseboats are especially bad for this because they create almost no wake of their own to 'shelter' the towed boat.

butter
05-30-2007, 11:23 AM
Is there any reason not to just put the transmission 'in gear', to keep the prop from turning? Or maybe that would put more stress on the drive train? (just wondering)

gtink
05-30-2007, 02:43 PM
First of all, Mastercraft won't have a clue about the answer to your question, since they don't build the trans (or the engine) and they never bother to find out the actual technical info on the sourced out parts. (try getting engine cam specs from MC lol).

Since I didn't design that tranny either, I don't know for sure but here is my answer: The answer is that it won't hurt your transmission, because UNLIKE a car's transmision, the tail shaft bearing is a roller bearing. On a car, the tailshaft bearing is actually a bushing and requires a hydrodynamic film of lubrication to function properly. There is MORE than enough lube on your roller bearings to keep that bearing happy for many, many miles (or knots).

I tow my boat at least once a year, over 75 miles on Lake Powell behind a houseboat. Been doing it for 6 years w/my boat alone, plus various other comp ski boats. That's over 450 miles of towing on my boat alone. Never had an problem w/it, and I know for SURE, that if my boat is moving in the water, my prop is turning because my drive train is as straight as a gun barrel.

Either your packing is way WAY too tight or you're drive train is not lined up properly. I'd put money on the drive train because:
1. No direct drive boat comes w/properly aligned drivetrain no matter what the brand, and
2. I've not yet seen a DD boat w/properly aligned drive train, other than the ones that I've done myself.

To check yours you need to loosen the packing and turn the prop as a test; you should be able to turn your prop out of the water, wet OR dry, with one pinky finger. If you can't then something is wrong and it's adding friction and wear to the drive system.

-Tom


Tom, you sure should like you know what you are doing... I like it. Thats the kind of info I wanted to hear from my MC mechnic and parts department. thanks so much, I will rest a little eaiser while towing my boat short distances. My version of short is 2 - 5 miles before cranking.

gtink
05-30-2007, 02:46 PM
gtink Ė there should not be an issue with the transmission but I would ask the manufacture, Indmar, to be sure. The main difference that you have that others donít is the speed at which you probably tow your boat behind a SeaRay 330. Most others tow behind houseboats that travel much slower.


I tow at idle speed of less than 1000 RPM on both 454's. Yea, I know its a pwerful SeaRay... Lots of fun, but loves the fuel.

Max speed during tow, 5 knots.

Tnanks for the info though, I will try to call indmar as well.

Ric
05-30-2007, 02:52 PM
First of all, Mastercraft won't have a clue about the answer to your question, since they don't build the trans (or the engine) and they never bother to find out the actual technical info on the sourced out parts. (try getting engine cam specs from MC lol).

1. No direct drive boat comes w/properly aligned drivetrain no matter what the brand, and
2. I've not yet seen a DD boat w/properly aligned drive train, other than the ones that I've done myself.

To check yours you need to loosen the packing and turn the prop as a test; you should be able to turn your prop out of the water, wet OR dry, with one pinky finger. If you can't then something is wrong and it's adding friction and wear to the drive system.

-Tom

Tom, I've never checked my drivetrain, but that it a helluva statement.

gtink
05-30-2007, 02:55 PM
Is there any reason not to just put the transmission 'in gear', to keep the prop from turning? Or maybe that would put more stress on the drive train? (just wondering)

Not sure when, but newer MC are fly by wire, and will not go in gear or throttle without ignition on. I don't want engine hours to count up while towing.

I could put a strap on the prop to blatform, but my boat stays at a dry dock and trailer in a storage location. I just call and they put it into the water for me. (yea lazy I know, but sure is nice when your in a hurry). I will just tow it slow for now.

Thanks for all the advise guys.

Ric
05-30-2007, 02:58 PM
Not sure when, but newer MC are fly by wire, and will not go in gear or throttle without ignition on. I don't want engine hours to count up while towing.

I could put a strap on the prop to blatform, but my boat stays at a dry dock and trailer in a storage location. I just call and they put it into the water for me. (yea lazy I know, but sure is nice when your in a hurry). I will just tow it slow for now.

Thanks for all the advise guys. That answers my question about removing the prop. albeit a hassle, it would eliminate the worry

Storm861triple
05-30-2007, 05:43 PM
Be careful ....... very, very careful. There's TONS of pictures on Hotboat of ski/board boats that have completely swamped/sunk as a result of being towed behind houseboats on Lake Powell.
Don't forget that when under tow, ski boats don't 'nose up' like they do when under power. This lets lake rollers and big boat wakes come over the bow of the towed boat VERY easily. I think houseboats are especially bad for this because they create almost no wake of their own to 'shelter' the towed boat.
Don't worry; after towing multiple boats behind houseboats for over 10 years (6 years is just on my current boat), I pretty much know how to do it by now. I know the mechanics of how towing a boat works. Thanks though.

Storm861triple
05-30-2007, 05:45 PM
Is there any reason not to just put the transmission 'in gear', to keep the prop from turning? Or maybe that would put more stress on the drive train? (just wondering)
Putting it in gear will do nothing different than what putting it in neutral will do. The engine is not running, so there is no oil pressure in the trans to engage the forward clutch pack. What does that mean? W/the shifter in "gear" but the engine off, the transmission is still effectively in neutral.

Storm861triple
05-30-2007, 05:45 PM
Tom, you sure should like you know what you are doing... I like it. Thats the kind of info I wanted to hear from my MC mechnic and parts department. thanks so much, I will rest a little eaiser while towing my boat short distances. My version of short is 2 - 5 miles before cranking.
10-4. Glad I was clear! :)

Storm861triple
05-30-2007, 05:47 PM
Tom, I've never checked my drivetrain, but that it a helluva statement.
I know it. I'd love to see a factory or dealer prepped boat that IS set up right though. So far, that hasn't happened for me.

TMCNo1
05-30-2007, 07:52 PM
I know it. I'd love to see a factory or dealer prepped boat that IS set up right though. So far, that hasn't happened for me.


I must have the only illegitimate child of the entire inboard boat industry!
Our drivetrain has never been aligned since it was built over 18 1/2 years ago and it's never needed it, I've checked per instructions in the owners manual.

Storm861triple
05-31-2007, 11:18 AM
TMCNo1, Can you turn your prop w/one pinky? Wet or dry?

I ask becuase it's possible for the flanges to meet up and meet the "spec", but still not have a straight, and friction free drive train.

WilliM1940
05-31-2007, 02:33 PM
Storm, can you put a torque number on pinky turn over please?

Storm861triple
05-31-2007, 03:10 PM
Hmmm, well I haven't put a measuring device on any of the drive trains that I've aligned but if I was pressed to come up w/a number, I'd guess about 1-2 pinky-lbs. :)

Diesel
05-31-2007, 03:28 PM
Not sure when, but newer MC are fly by wire, and will not go in gear or throttle without ignition on. I don't want engine hours to count up while towing.


This is not true. Yes it is DBW on the throttle but not on the transmission. There is still a transmission selector cable and in principal it works the same as the old boats.

WilliM1940
05-31-2007, 04:44 PM
Hmmm, well I haven't put a measuring device on any of the drive trains that I've aligned but if I was pressed to come up w/a number, I'd guess about 1-2 pinky-lbs. :)

All righty, 8p Guess I could seperate the shaft from the transmission output and the two torques added together would be "perfect". Really think that just the strut bushings dry would be plenty pinky torque alone...just got me thinking.

TMCNo1
05-31-2007, 04:57 PM
TMCNo1, Can you turn your prop w/one pinky? Wet or dry?

I ask becuase it's possible for the flanges to meet up and meet the "spec", but still not have a straight, and friction free drive train.


Dry, yes! Wintertime when it's not been in the water for a few weeks.
Wet, barely! Boating season after about the second trip of the year.

The friction generated too, can be how tight the stuffing box is, the majority of the time.
After 18 years, if it wasn't aligned right and I had not kept that way, I would think I would have seen some problems.

Storm861triple
06-01-2007, 01:24 PM
After 18 years, if it wasn't aligned right and I had not kept that way, I would think I would have seen some problems.
Maybe, but I don't comletely agree w/that dismissive reasoning because of my experience w/this boat (copied from another thread):
OTOH, I have worked on a '77 Ski Nautique that has 750+ hours, and a bent strut and drive shaft. The owner refuses to spend money on a new strut and shaft, and continues to operate the boat, problem free mostly, every year. So a "stiff shaft" won't leave you stranded or anything like that, but again, friction is not ever a good thing in a drive system, and it is my belief that ALL these boats come equiped standard with too much of it. IMO the alignment they do at the factory(ies) is a "wham-bam-thank-you-m'am" deal...it's not THEIR boat. The alignment we are all capable of can be much better, just because I think we are all willing to spend the extra time to make it "dead nuts on"

As I said, this guy runs his boat year after year, w/o any "problems", but his drivetrain is a disaster. He knows it, but just doesn't care. I'm not implying that TMCNo1 or anyone elses drive drain is a "disaster"...I'm just saying that just because you have been driving your boat for years, and the drive shaft hasn't come throught he floor, doesn't meant that it's correctly set up either. None of the boats I've worked on, including mine, were correct....but they were all "running fine" before I adjusted them.

TMCNo1
06-01-2007, 01:41 PM
Maybe, but I don't comletely agree w/that dismissive reasoning because of my experience w/this boat (copied from another thread):


As I said, this guy runs his boat year after year, w/o any "problems", but his drivetrain is a disaster. He knows it, but just doesn't care. I'm not implying that TMCNo1 or anyone elses drive drain is a "disaster"...I'm just saying that just because you have been driving your boat for years, and the drive shaft hasn't come throught he floor, doesn't meant that it's correctly set up either. None of the boats I've worked on, including mine, were correct....but they were all "running fine" before I adjusted them.


Then you need to tell us what "Correct" is so we can all fix ours before the sky falls.
The owners manual tells you when to do it and how to do it and the dealers service techs are educated by Mastercraft according to industry procedures on how to do it on their customers boats. What does the rest of the world not know, that you do about what is correct? It's time you told us, so we can all address your suspected issues.

Storm861triple
06-01-2007, 04:54 PM
I already DID tell you how. Post #16 in this thread, there is a link to another post I made in a different thread a long time ago. It's all right there...
I sure can! :)

Start by reading these two threads and then if you have any more questions, I'd be happy to answer them!

http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=24631&postcount=6
But, I'll point out the difference between "my" drive train alignment and Mastercrafts. Mine STARTS with a verification of the strut's alignment w/the prop shaft log. If this dimension is off on any plane, you will be aligning your engine/trans to a shaft that isn't itself aligned w/the boat, and/or is being bent by the shaft seal assy. I know of at least two boats (mine being one of them) in which the prop shaft did not get sent through the center of the prop shaft log. It's all covered in the link above. Check it out.

Lastly, I never said anything about the "Sky falling" so you don't need to be putting words in my mouth, thank you very much. As a matter of fact, both in my posts above, AND in the link provided, I mentioned and showed examples of boats that run for HUNDREDS of hours w/focked up drivetrains...w/o incident. Does that mean that they are "correct" just because they CAN operate that way? Of course not. The level of "anality" that I practice on my boat and post about here is not necessary to provide a long operating life. But a drive train set up (checked) my way will last longER, run smoothER, and be MORE efficient than one which is binding all the time. Can't really argue that point. I guess I'm a bit anal, and I went a step further than MC recommends. I'm damn glad that I did, based on what I found. I would think that someone who's sig states. "Pride in ownership, Use and Maintenance of Mastercraft Boats" would relate to and be on board w/my "anality". ;)

-Tom

Storm861triple
06-01-2007, 05:18 PM
Guess I could seperate the shaft from the transmission output and the two torques added together would be "perfect". Really think that just the strut bushings dry would be plenty pinky torque alone...just got me thinking.

The transmission output should require virtually zero torque to turn. Should be similar feeling to spinning the prop on a I/O or O/B engine. The majority of your drive drain friction should come from the strut bushings and the shaft seal....and if it's straight, is should not be much at all, as I've pointed out. In my anal opinion. ;)

-Tom

TMCNo1
06-01-2007, 10:11 PM
I already DID tell you how. Post #16 in this thread, there is a link to another post I made in a different thread a long time ago. It's all right there...

But, I'll point out the difference between "my" drive train alignment and Mastercrafts. Mine STARTS with a verification of the strut's alignment w/the prop shaft log. If this dimension is off on any plane, you will be aligning your engine/trans to a shaft that isn't itself aligned w/the boat, and/or is being bent by the shaft seal assy. I know of at least two boats (mine being one of them) in which the prop shaft did not get sent through the center of the prop shaft log. It's all covered in the link above. Check it out.

Lastly, I never said anything about the "Sky falling" so you don't need to be putting words in my mouth, thank you very much. As a matter of fact, both in my posts above, AND in the link provided, I mentioned and showed examples of boats that run for HUNDREDS of hours w/focked up drivetrains...w/o incident. Does that mean that they are "correct" just because they CAN operate that way? Of course not. The level of "anality" that I practice on my boat and post about here is not necessary to provide a long operating life. But a drive train set up (checked) my way will last longER, run smoothER, and be MORE efficient than one which is binding all the time. Can't really argue that point. I guess I'm a bit anal, and I went a step further than MC recommends. I'm damn glad that I did, based on what I found. I would think that someone who's sig states. "Pride in ownership, Use and Maintenance of Mastercraft Boats" would relate to and be on board w/my "anality". ;)

-Tom



Thanks for your reply,
I have read your posts and link several times before and again tonight. The Maintenance part of my signature is based on MasterCrafts Owners Manual and Service Manual instructions, not based on a persons statement of "IMO", My Way and MY Drivetrain Alignments. I appreciate your being anal about your boat, I am too, but I use established guidelines by our boat manufacturer and I will until they amend them to another method, given it is yours or someone elses, but I do respect your opinion, because that is all it is until Mastercraft and the industry is proven wrong.
In the mean time, my prop is undamaged and balanced, strut is aligned with the shaft and the strut bushings are fine, the shaft is centered in the stuffing box, the stuffingg box is working to my satisfaction, the shaft is straight, the couplings are within manufactures tolerances and the transmission and engine are bolted up tight. What more can I or anyone else ask for and I am happy with the way it performs. Thanks again.

WilliM1940
06-01-2007, 11:31 PM
There is nothing really wrong with what he is saying, this marine surveyor below essentially agrees with him. What is kind of amazing (at least to me) is that all this power and mass is mounted in rubber and it doesn't rip itself apart at high speed, its all got to be flexing.

from: http://www.yachtsurvey.com/alignment.htm

"Many boat yards think that the way to check shaft alignment is to disconnect the coupling and check the flange clearance with a feeler gauge. That's only part of the story. Before doing this, with the vessel hauled, check the position of the shafts relative to the bearings. Cutless bearings that are worn more on one side than another are a positive indicator that something is out of alignment. Heavy shafts of 1.5" or more will naturally compress the rubber bearing on the bottom side, but not so much that there's an obvious gap at the top.

Next, check the shaft-to-bearing alignment at both the front and back ends of the bearing. If the shaft is off-centered, either to one side, top or bottom at one end, but is off-centered to the opposite side at the other end, then the shaft is not parallel with the bearing bore. It is either up or down, or off to one side. In this case, the whole system should be suspect, at which point the entire system alignment must be redone, including setting up target wire to make sure that the struts themselves are properly aligned"

Storm861triple
06-02-2007, 10:05 AM
Well, there you have it No1.

It not "just MY opinion". This is technically the best and most complete way to do an FULL drivetrain alignment. The "my opinion" part was whether or not it is necessary. It's not necessary, but if you want to know that every thing is correct, what I out lined, (and the marine surveyor too BTW) is the way to do it. As much "reading" as you claim to have done, you seem to think that "MY Opinion" is that MC's alignment protocol is "wrong". It's not, and I never said that it was.

As a matter of fact (here I go again w/the FACTS about what I said) I said this:THEN, I proceeded to align the engine/trans to the newly, geometrically correct drive line....THEN move your motor to accomidate that geometry. HTH....Then, like I said above, I spent a good hour or so, moving the engine/trans around to accomodate that new propshaft geometry, getting the engine/trans aligned to the propshaft...perfectly.
...As per the factory service manual. I'm not contesting what MC advised, I'm just adding to what they recommend, based on my experience of "discovering" how f'ked up some of these boats actually leave the factory. It's a good recomondation for anyone who cares about their boat as much as I do, and I think anyone w/common sense, intelligence, and a modicum of mechanical inclination should be able to see the reasoning behind my recomondation. "My opinion" or not, what I out lined is the MOST thorough and correct way to check your drive train.

FYI, There is a lot that MC claims that is incorrect, or incomplete. MC is FAR from omniscient. Far. Sounds like your boat is perfect already though, so you've got nothing to worry about. That's great! Lastly, if you don't like the technically correct answer I provide, don't ask the questions.

-Tom

6ballsisall
06-02-2007, 03:34 PM
:rolleyes: :popcorn: :uglyhamme

agua4fun
06-02-2007, 04:28 PM
I like to TYPE with CAPS TOO!!

Storm861triple
06-02-2007, 07:26 PM
Is that better? ^

Do people on this board have some kind of problem with the information that I'm sharing?

I would think that folks would want all of the information... (?)

-Tom

Workin' 4 Toys
06-02-2007, 08:47 PM
Do people on this board have some kind of problem with the information that I'm sharing?

I would think that folks would want all of the information... (?)

-Tom
I have no problem with it.

JohnnyB
06-02-2007, 09:06 PM
I think what you said about shaft alignments makes perfect sense.....th strut should align with the log should align with the engine and tranny. After reading it, I did walk through the garage and gave my prop a pinky spin. It spun pretty easily.

Thanks for the insight. In fall, when I recheck my alignment, I'll probably check it at the log, too.

Bert
06-02-2007, 11:19 PM
Is that better? ^

Do people on this board have some kind of problem with the information that I'm sharing?

I would think that folks would want all of the information... (?)

-Tom
No problem with the type of info you post. It is the reason I visit.
Just remember, this board is dominated by a few who publish their "opinions" as fact all the time.For example, one of them learned how to post just shy of two years ago and now has over 8000 posts, most of which are useless except the ones about polishing stuff.
It is nice to get some useful information about maintaining mastercrafts.

mhsb1029
06-03-2007, 01:24 AM
Is that better? ^

Do people on this board have some kind of problem with the information that I'm sharing?

I would think that folks would want all of the information... (?)

-Tom

Thanks a ton for the info, I have 2 weeks left of teaching until summer break and this will be one of the first things that I am going to work on with my dad's boat when I get a chance. After talking to my brother today, he said that he had to use 2 hands to turn the prop while it was on the trailer. I would guess that in its current state it meets the MC specs, but I know that we should be able to do better than their specs.

As far as the MC certified mechanics and their supper kick *** specs, we were the last ones to diagnose and fix a problem on our 04 X-Star, when the certified MC mechanics could not figure it out.

Once again, thanks for the info, it is greatly appreciated.

WilliM1940
06-03-2007, 01:33 AM
Typical posts of late on this forum might contain content on Chee-tos stains and cup holder problems with beer bottles. Did you ever wonder what MC execs think of their customers after reading goop like that?

Another boating forum just lost a valued contributer due to sniping. Don't let it get to you.

bucky
06-05-2007, 08:24 AM
Well, I just checked my boat, and I guess NO ONE will be happy with the results.
As stated earlier, my boat was a "heavy 2 hander" in the prop turning dept. On the assumption that the shaft knew where it was supposed to be, I loosened the eight screws holding the strut. It was siliconed on, so I took a 2 lb deadblow hammer and whacked it a couple 3 times. Once it had settled where it wanted, I tightened the screws. Now the prop turns with a pinky.
Mission accomplished.

Sodar
06-05-2007, 10:08 AM
Originally Posted by Storm861triple
First of all, Mastercraft won't have a clue about the answer to your question, since they don't build the trans (or the engine) and they never bother to find out the actual technical info on the sourced out parts. (try getting engine cam specs from MC lol).

1. No direct drive boat comes w/properly aligned drivetrain no matter what the brand, and
2. I've not yet seen a DD boat w/properly aligned drive train, other than the ones that I've done myself.

To check yours you need to loosen the packing and turn the prop as a test; you should be able to turn your prop out of the water, wet OR dry, with one pinky finger. If you can't then something is wrong and it's adding friction and wear to the drive system.

-Tom


I went and checked mine this weekend after it sat on the trailer for a week and thepinky test worked... and Tom has never touched my strut, prop shaft or bushings!

I have no problem with the information you are providing, it is the manner and tone in which you are providing it that ticks me off. Harold has forgotten more about MC's than most will ever know... belittling people is not going exactly enhancing your credibility.

Storm861triple
06-05-2007, 01:11 PM
I went and checked mine this weekend after it sat on the trailer for a week and thepinky test worked... and Tom has never touched my strut, prop shaft or bushings!

I have no problem with the information you are providing, it is the manner and tone in which you are providing it that ticks me off. Harold has forgotten more about MC's than most will ever know... belittling people is not going exactly enhancing your credibility.
That's great that your drive trains turns smoothly! That just saved you a bunch of work. Not everyone has the same good "luck" though. Read bucky's post.

Who is Harold? "TMCNo1"?

I didn't belittle anyone. I DID however have to walk some people though information that I had already posted, because they weren't reading my posts thoroughly. My technically correct information should be sufficient to support my "credibility". That has nothing to do w/my admittadly abrasive delivery.

I'm glad bucky read and benefitted from my postings. It's great that someone did. :)

bucky
06-05-2007, 02:53 PM
And thank you for the information. Whether or not there was technically something wrong (apparently there was), I consider the adjustment an improvement.

PendO
06-06-2007, 09:11 AM
That's great that your drive trains turns smoothly! That just saved you a bunch of work. Not everyone has the same good "luck" though. Read bucky's post.

Who is Harold? "TMCNo1"?

I didn't belittle anyone. I DID however have to walk some people though information that I had already posted, because they weren't reading my posts thoroughly. My technically correct information should be sufficient to support my "credibility". That has nothing to do w/my admittadly abrasive delivery.

I'm glad bucky read and benefitted from my postings. It's great that someone did. :)

Hey Tom, thanks a bunch ... neither of our MC's can pass the pinky test ... my brother (MHSB1029 - Mark) and I sure appreciate the information ... apparently Harold has one of the few perfect mastercrafts out there ...

Cameron, sounds like you got lucky ... then again, I'm sure the oil filter was torqued to MC specs:) (right Harold?)