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View Full Version : Trailer Tire Alignment: Where to Go?


TonyB
04-30-2007, 07:38 PM
My left tire, on the very outside edge, wears down exceedingly quick. At the beginning of spring last year, I noticed that the left tire's steel belt was showing along the outside edge (the part that makes road contact). I replaced all the tires (including spare) with Goodyear Marathons. I've kept them at 50+ psi. Yesterday (less than 2000 miles later) I noticed that the left tire had worn down to the steel belt once again. Obviously, there is a problem.

Can I take my trailer to any alignment shop and have them correct this?

TMCNo1
04-30-2007, 08:57 PM
My left tire, on the very outside edge, wears down exceedingly quick. At the beginning of spring last year, I noticed that the left tire's steel belt was showing along the outside edge (the part that makes road contact). I replaced all the tires (including spare) with Goodyear Marathons. I've kept them at 50+ psi. Yesterday (less than 2000 miles later) I noticed that the left tire had worn down to the steel belt once again. Obviously, there is a problem.

Can I take my trailer to any alignment shop and have them correct this?

Our original Unique Engineering axle had a spindle problem and MC replaced it under warranty with a UFP axle and it was bent during shipping to MC and I wore out the outside edge of 2 tires in about 2000 miles. I had 3/8" toe-in on both sides and should have only had 1/64" toe-in total per UFP. I took the trailer with the boat on it to a road tractor/ tractor trailer repair facility that did spring, suspension, alignment services and they chained it down on the big frame machine and pulled it into tolerances with hydraulic cylinders and chains and I now have little or no wear after the alignment and that was 15 years ago.

east tx skier
04-30-2007, 09:29 PM
I had mine alined after the lift so my trailer lifting tech could weld the pins in place (just in case I were to drop it off the back of a ramp, we figured we didn't want to pull everything off the axle).

TonyB
05-01-2007, 01:42 PM
I had mine alined after the lift so my trailer lifting tech could weld the pins in place...

I'm stupid so type slow. I don't know what you are saying in the above quote. After what lift? What is a trailer lifting tech? Am I supposed to have a trailer lifting tech?

Where did you go? TMCNo1 went to tractor/truck alignment place. But it almost sounds like a frame alignment center as opposed to tire alignment.

What do I look for in the yellow pages?

TMCNo1
05-01-2007, 02:17 PM
I'm stupid so type slow. I don't know what you are saying in the above quote. After what lift? What is a trailer lifting tech? Am I supposed to have a trailer lifting tech?

Where did you go? TMCNo1 went to tractor/truck alignment place. But it almost sounds like a frame alignment center as opposed to tire alignment.

What do I look for in the yellow pages?


Most light vehicle alignment/service/tireshops don't have the capabilites to bend axles back in shape as do heavy truck spring/alignment service centers. Body shops have the same or simular but smaller equipment for pickups and cars to bend and shape stuff, but the $$$$ is considerably more, unless you have a buddy that has access to the equipment and will know what to do.

Look under, "Truck Repair and Service" in the Yellow Pages, some shops have a name like, Liberty Spring, Salem Spring, Auto Spring, etc. and if they re-arch springs and do large suspension work, that's your key to ask them if they can handle the job.

Here is exact info I got from UFP (Unique Functional Products),
REMEMBER, 60 minutes = 1 degree
Camber (the plane of the top of tire to bottom of tire) on plain axle, NO LOAD @ 45 minutes, each spindle.
Should be 0 minutes with load (boat on trailer).

Caster is Toe-in (the plane of the front of tire to back of tire) and is 4 minutes each spindle, (loaded or emtpy) and will be near 0 while the trailer is traveling down the road due to the friction of the roadbed forcing the front of the tires outward.

-It is best to check the Alignment while the boat is on the trailer as it would be towed.
-It is best to perform the Alignment with the boat on the trailer as it would be towed.

I also sent you 2 pm's!

TonyB
05-01-2007, 04:29 PM
Most light vehicle alignment/service/tireshops don't have the capabilites to bend axles back in shape as do heavy truck spring/alignment service centers. Body shops have the same or simular but smaller equipment for pickups and cars to bend and shape stuff, but the $$$$ is considerably more, unless you have a buddy that has access to the equipment and will know what to do.

Look under, "Truck Repair and Service" in the Yellow Pages, some shops have a name like, Liberty Spring, Salem Spring, Auto Spring, etc. and if they re-arch springs and do large suspension work, that's your key to ask them if they can handle the job.

Here is exact info I got from UFP (Unique Functional Products),
REMEMBER, 60 minutes = 1 degree
Camber (the plane of the top of tire to bottom of tire) on plain axle, NO LOAD @ 45 minutes, each spindle.
Should be 0 minutes with load (boat on trailer).

Caster is Toe-in (the plane of the front of tire to back of tire) and is 4 minutes each spindle, (loaded or emtpy) and will be near 0 while the trailer is traveling down the road due to the friction of the roadbed forcing the front of the tires outward.

-It is best to check the Alignment while the boat is on the trailer as it would be towed.
-It is best to perform the Alignment with the boat on the trailer as it would be towed.

I also sent you 2 pm's!

Outstanding. I will probably give you a call when I get a moment.

Thanks.

east tx skier
05-01-2007, 05:21 PM
I'm stupid so type slow. I don't know what you are saying in the above quote. After what lift? What is a trailer lifting tech? Am I supposed to have a trailer lifting tech?

Where did you go? TMCNo1 went to tractor/truck alignment place. But it almost sounds like a frame alignment center as opposed to tire alignment.

What do I look for in the yellow pages?

Sorry, I had a 2" lift put on my trailer. The tech is a guy who I got to do this for me. Upon his suggestion, I had my local alignment shop do the alignment on the trailer before the lift guy welded the pins on the axle in place. One of the guys who works at the alignment shop is a member here "bbutler2001". I'm sure he could answer some questions on the specifics. Shoot him a PM.

TMCNo1
05-01-2007, 06:27 PM
The axle has a small plate welded to the top of it where the springs will set and the plate has a hole in it in the center. The springs then have a pin sticking down in the location where they set up against the axle and the pin sets in the hole in the plate to prevent the axle from sliding forward or backwards and the springs and axle are bolted to each other with the big U bolts. In ETS's case the hole had to be drilled in the top of the block and a pin welded on the bottomside to create the proper connection, to prevent anything from sliding in case something hit or caught the axle. They also probably used longer U-bolts.