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Jwhitsett1129
04-02-2007, 02:40 PM
I feel like a moron for having to ask such a thing, but I am now beginning to question what I thought was the case for quite some time.

I was having lunch with a friend (he is a car guy)today and we were talking about getting the boat all ready for the season. I was explaining the steps for de-winterization and we got into a little debate. For self-preservation purposes I will refrain from saying which side of the debate I was on...:cool:

We were arguing about whether the engine should be at operating temp for an oil change or if it should be done while the engine is cold. Can someone 1. provide an answer to this debate and 2. explain why??

JKTX21
04-02-2007, 02:42 PM
I've always warmed the engine before changing oil, never really thought about why though.

mpm32
04-02-2007, 02:45 PM
The oil change should be done while the engine is warm. One, it suspends and mixes any particulates that could be present helping to get them out of pan while changing and two the oil will flow better when warm.

beatle78
04-02-2007, 02:46 PM
I'm not sure about operating temp, but my thought was that warm oil flows better. Draining oil out of that narrow hose takes long enough as it is. I always warm it up first for that reason.

Don't forget to take your valve cover cap off. I've been known to blow in the valce cap opening when the oil pan seems empty just to get that extra 1/2 cup of oil out.

my:twocents:

dmayer84
04-02-2007, 02:46 PM
I change the oil when warm, but usually let it drain for about an hour as long as I have time to let all the oil possible drain out.

TMCNo1
04-02-2007, 02:48 PM
I feel like a moron for having to ask such a thing, but I am now beginning to question what I thought was the case for quite some time.

I was having lunch with a friend (he is a car guy)today and we were talking about getting the boat all ready for the season. I was explaining the steps for de-winterization and we got into a little debate. For self-preservation purposes I will refrain from saying which side of the debate I was on...:cool:

We were arguing about whether the engine should be at operating temp for an oil change or if it should be done while the engine is cold. Can someone 1. provide an answer to this debate and 2. explain why??


Bigmac, I ain't touching this!

JimN
04-02-2007, 02:49 PM
If you think cold oil will come out willingly, go ahead and do it that way, especially if you use gravity to get the oil out of a boat motor and even with a suction pump, it's a PITA to remove cold oil. The only reason I would think that doing it cold is good is that more of the oil will be in the crankcase but once it's re-filled, there's no way to know how much it takes to get to "FULL" since just checking how much came out isn't the way to fill it. Hot oil comes out a lot easier and running it puts more of the particulates in suspension, instead of laying at the bottom of the pan and when the plug comes out, so do the particulates. Most of what's left over will be removed by the new filter.

Unless "room temperature" is extremely cold, putting the oil into the motor when it's hot won't be an issue.

Jwhitsett1129
04-02-2007, 02:52 PM
Warm is what I was arguing as well. His point was that if the engine is cold then all of the oil will be in the oil pan and will drain more effectively....

bigmac
04-02-2007, 02:55 PM
Bigmac, I ain't touching this!Warm oil is warmer than cold oil.

TMCNo1
04-02-2007, 03:09 PM
Warm oil is warmer than cold oil.

:uglyhamme You made my day!

chudson
04-02-2007, 03:27 PM
I feel like a moron for having to ask such a thing, but I am now beginning to question what I thought was the case for quite some time.

I was having lunch with a friend (he is a car guy)today and we were talking about getting the boat all ready for the season. I was explaining the steps for de-winterization and we got into a little debate. For self-preservation purposes I will refrain from saying which side of the debate I was on...:cool:

We were arguing about whether the engine should be at operating temp for an oil change or if it should be done while the engine is cold. Can someone 1. provide an answer to this debate and 2. explain why??

I'm not an expert but my guess is that any sediment in the heads and in the bottom of the pan will more likely get loose and got out of the motor in a warm oil change than a cold one. Don't go cheap, warm it up to change it is my opinion!!!:twocents:

Jkelly
04-02-2007, 03:33 PM
I was always told that it mixes any contamination in with the oil so you can get it out. If you drain it cold you have a chance of leaving it in the bottom of the sump.

east tx skier
04-02-2007, 03:49 PM
Just to pile on. Warm. Flows better (assuming I remember to take the cap off).

bigmac
04-02-2007, 03:56 PM
Guys...

Like most things related to oil, it's very possible to overthink this issue. Really, it's not rocket science...common sense applies.

River Rat
04-02-2007, 03:59 PM
For self-preservation purposes I will refrain from saying which side of the debate I was on...:cool:

?


Now come on now........ you can tell us:D

wakescene
04-02-2007, 04:01 PM
Jwhitsett1129, you mentioned that your buddy was a car guy. I am speculating but I will guess that he errors on the side of cold! Why I think this is back int eh day I ran a towing company at a high-end Import auto repair shop. These guys claimed all sorts of crazy stuff like changing the oil in the european cars only when it's cold so that any condensation that might be in the system will drain to the bottom of the pan and come during a oil change. VW's had a tendency to hold moisture in the oil system. The 98-99Beetles were especially prone to this. So were the 1994-1997 Jaguar XJ6's.

IMO:
- Cars ok to do warm or cold (on a properly maintained vehicle)
- Boats, Warm that beast up first!

trickskier
04-02-2007, 04:05 PM
The oil change should be done while the engine is warm. One, it suspends and mixes any particulates that could be present helping to get them out of pan while changing and two the oil will flow better when warm.
This is exactly what I've been told by the people I buy my oil from.

Leroy
04-02-2007, 04:05 PM
Does this apply to synthetic also? ;)

Guys...

Like most things related to oil, it's very possible to overthink this issue. Really, it's not rocket science...common sense applies.

Jwhitsett1129
04-02-2007, 04:36 PM
Jwhitsett1129, you mentioned that your buddy was a car guy. I am speculating but I will guess that he errors on the side of cold! Why I think this is back int eh day I ran a towing company at a high-end Import auto repair shop. These guys claimed all sorts of crazy stuff like changing the oil in the european cars only when it's cold so that any condensation that might be in the system will drain to the bottom of the pan and come during a oil change. VW's had a tendency to hold moisture in the oil system. The 98-99Beetles were especially prone to this. So were the 1994-1997 Jaguar XJ6's.

IMO:
- Cars ok to do warm or cold (on a properly maintained vehicle)
- Boats, Warm that beast up first!

He is a shadetree Lexus mechanic...good call! ;)

bigmac
04-02-2007, 04:46 PM
Does this apply to synthetic also? ;)


...........http://mccollister.info/gifs/pokestick.gif

Jkelly
04-02-2007, 04:51 PM
..................:uglyhamme

TMCNo1
04-02-2007, 08:22 PM
I always though that having the engine warm, made to new cold oil warm up and go to the pan quicker as you poured it in. Ya larn somethin' new everday!

JimN
04-02-2007, 08:34 PM
"His point was that if the engine is cold then all of the oil will be in the oil pan and will drain more effectively...."

How is draining slowly more effective? You might want to remind him that faster moving fluids will take things with them (like dirt particles). Plus, waiting for oil to drain is a ginormous waste of time.

TX.X-30 fan
04-02-2007, 08:45 PM
Yes warm the oil, and I'm with Bigmac on that little hose :confused: Used it for the first time, I will suck it out the stick from now on, much faster. I did get 4.25 quarts back in draining through the tube. I don't think that was much different than when I have pumped it out.

onewheat
04-02-2007, 08:47 PM
As an auto mechanic by trade, I NEVER change oil cold on my engines or a customers. I always get the engine up to temperature, because you are more likely to get the contaminants in the oil out while they are suspended in the oil. As the oil sits and cools, the heavy contaminants will settle to the lowest part of the pan, which does not necessarily drain completely diring a change. Also, whoever said it before is correct, quicker draining oil is more likely to pull things out with it. Just my $0.02.

BriEOD
04-02-2007, 09:35 PM
Warm oil is warmer than cold oil.
Gee, thanks for that Socrates.:rolleyes:

bigmac
04-02-2007, 09:38 PM
Gee, thanks for that Socrates.:rolleyes:Chemistry major...

Footin
04-02-2007, 09:39 PM
Gee, thanks for that Socrates.:rolleyes:

That reminds me of Bill and Ted.........sooo-crates.hehehehe

Hoosier Bob
04-02-2007, 10:31 PM
Actually you should change your oil warm and at the end of the season, not the beginning. Warm oil should and will draw out more contaminants. These are the same contaminants that should not be left in your engine during storage. All this from a guy that sent a nut right through the distributor hole!:o

JimN
04-02-2007, 10:34 PM
TX.X30- why not suck it out through the hose? You'll get more out because that's at the lowest point in the pan.

BriEOD
04-02-2007, 11:04 PM
Chemistry major...
Yeah, well a rock like me with a Criminal Justice BS and International Relations MS and could figure that one out Mac.8p

BriEOD
04-02-2007, 11:05 PM
All this from a guy that sent a nut right through the distributor hole!:o
That wasn't a very nice thing to do to UMP.

Jesus_Freak
04-02-2007, 11:21 PM
How is draining slowly more effective? You might want to remind him that faster moving fluids will take things with them (like dirt particles). Plus, waiting for oil to drain is a ginormous waste of time.

Absolutely. Plus the remaining "film" of spent oil covering the walls of the oil pan will be much thinner (a more complete drain) when the draining is performed with hot oil. As long as ample time has been alloted for the oil to fall down from the heads, etc., I cannot see any advantage to draining cold.

BTW, ginormous is a cool word.

the legend
04-03-2007, 12:20 AM
at the shop, bring boat in, run boat on hose to operating temp, turn motor off, wait ten minutes, drain oil from oil pan hose w/ pump, replace filter w/ new-put oil in filter before installing, turn hand tight, quater turn w/ wrench, add just under 5qts oil (5.7L) start engine,verify oil pressure,shut off engine, wait ten minutes, verify oil level.done.

JimN
04-03-2007, 12:42 AM
So, what are you saying?

How was school? How is everyone at Alan's?

BCBlazers
04-03-2007, 12:42 AM
i always change my truck oil with a hot or warm engine b/c the warm engine allows the particles to flow more freely, same w/ a boat engine.

east tx skier
04-03-2007, 12:50 AM
at the shop, bring boat in, run boat on hose to operating temp, turn motor off, wait ten minutes, drain oil from oil pan hose w/ pump, replace filter w/ new-put oil in filter before installing, turn hand tight, quater turn w/ wrench, add just under 5qts oil (5.7L) start engine,verify oil pressure,shut off engine, wait ten minutes, verify oil level.done.


What? No oil in the filter? ;)

Jwhitsett1129
04-03-2007, 10:33 AM
Actually you should change your oil warm and at the end of the season, not the beginning. Warm oil should and will draw out more contaminants. These are the same contaminants that should not be left in your engine during storage. All this from a guy that sent a nut right through the distributor hole!:o

I actually changed the oil when winterizing and have changed it again for dewinterization....

Hoosier Bob
04-03-2007, 10:45 AM
You must run Dino!8p I still run M1 as that is what is came with. $20 at Walmart plus filter. I usually start the season on last years change and change early in the season as well. Looks new so I am sure it could outlast the changes. Sparkplugs and oil give you a great idea of how your motor condition is. More often you change the more likely you are to discover an adverse condition. I do not see why fresh oil in a pan would have to be changed after 4-5 months idle. Although if stored in varying conditions humidity condensation would be a good reason.

the legend
04-05-2007, 02:22 PM
i'm not sayn anything, except how to change the oil in a 5.7 L engine. School is good,syracuse is the same and we need post Cat O2 sensors.So, what are you saying?

How was school? How is everyone at Alan's?

the legend
04-05-2007, 02:23 PM
sorry, I do fill the filter, thats why I say just under 5Qts in the engine.What? No oil in the filter? ;)

JimN
04-05-2007, 09:41 PM
Doug- I copied this from his post:

"replace filter w/ new-put oil in filter before installing". It's OK, age just kinda creeps up on................what?