PDA

View Full Version : Oil Bath Hubs


chevy08bud
03-27-2007, 01:31 PM
Wondering if anyone has replaced their old grease type hubs with oil bath hubs, or if it is even possible? If it is possible, are they quite expensive, or even worth the changeover? Just thinking about this for down the road, and once I get something in my head, I have a hard time not knowing the answer.:confused:

TMCNo1
03-27-2007, 01:45 PM
Wondering if anyone has replaced their old grease type hubs with oil bath hubs, or if it is even possible? If it is possible, are they quite expensive, or even worth the changeover? Just thinking about this for down the road, and once I get something in my head, I have a hard time not knowing the answer.:confused:


I would be interested in hearing the answer to this question myself.

chevy08bud
03-27-2007, 04:00 PM
Let's see if we can get some more infor on this. Bump

vogelm1
03-27-2007, 06:54 PM
My '05 came with oil baths, and they sure are convenient. The "cap" on the outer hub serves as a sight glass, so you always know where the oil level is at, you can tell if water invaded your hub instantly because the oil will get milky, and when it comes time for bearing maintenance, all you need to do is drain the old oil and refill with new. Haven't had any issues in the two seasons I've owned mine. I'm positive you can do the retro, just not sure how much the new hubs would cost you. :twocents:

TMCNo1
03-27-2007, 07:21 PM
My '05 came with oil baths, and they sure are convenient. The "cap" on the outer hub serves as a sight glass, so you always know where the oil level is at, you can tell if water invaded your hub instantly because the oil will get milky, and when it comes time for bearing maintenance, all you need to do is drain the old oil and refill with new. Haven't had any issues in the two seasons I've owned mine. I'm positive you can do the retro, just not sure how much the new hubs would cost you. :twocents:


My question would be, will the oil bath sight cap and seals work in the old hub/rotor assemblies, then the old hubs could be cleaned, drilled and threaded for a fill hole, and fitted with the new seals, sight cap and then filled with oil.
Now that my curosity is up, you can bet the farm I will find out if this stuff will retrofit! I will be in contact with UFP (my brake system) in the next few days!

Andyg
03-27-2007, 07:25 PM
Seems like a cheap and easy upgrade according to this website.

Oil_Bath_Trailer_Hubs (http://http://www.trailerboats.com/output.cfm?id=967231)

TMCNo1
03-27-2007, 07:31 PM
Seems like a cheap and easy upgrade according to this website.

Oil_Bath_Trailer_Hubs (http://http://www.trailerboats.com/output.cfm?id=967231)

I get a warning, that this is a non secure intranet site and it will not display it. Any other secure link?

Andyg
03-27-2007, 07:34 PM
Fluid ThinkingConverting to oil-bath trailer-wheel hubs is fast and easy. Here’s howhttp://www.trailerboats.com/images/x.gifJim HendricksTrailer BoatsMay 1, 2005http://www.trailerboats.com/images/x.gif Email this article to a friend! (http://www.trailerboats.com/email.cfm?goto=/output.cfm?id=967231)http://www.trailerboats.com/images/x.gifhttp://www.trailerboats.com//images/elements/967231_tb0505turbo.jpg For years, most boat-trailer wheel bearings have relied on grease in the hubs for lubrication — but, more recently, a new genre of wheel hubs has emerged that uses gear oil instead. Intrigued about how well these work, we called Atlanta-based Tie-Down Engineering (404/344-0000; tiedown.com) and asked for a pair of the company’s Turbo Lube hubs ($100 per pair).

Our goal was twofold: (1) We wanted to see how difficult it was to retrofit the hubs on a trailer; and (2) how these oil-bath hubs would hold up in rugged trailering situations.


PERFECT VICTIM
Our subject was an old, single-axle trailer. We jacked up the trailer and removed the wheels and existing grease-style hubs. We tossed the old hubs and bearing protectors, but kept and cleaned the bearings, thrust washers, keepers, spindle nuts and cotter pins.

Each Turbo Lube hub comes with installed races and a loose rear seal, as well as lug nuts and studs. We lightly greased the races and bearings, nestled the rear bearings in their races, and tapped the rear seals into place in the hub.
We cleaned and lightly greased each spindle, slid the new Turbo Lube hubs carefully over the spindles, then installed the front bearings, thrust washers, keepers, spindle nuts and cotter pins.

Next, we spun on the Turbo Lube Cap, which relies on an O-ring to seal the outside of the hub. This clear plastic cap is designed to be hand-tightened, then rotated one-quarter-turn with a large wrench. Be careful, however, not to overtighten and crack the cap.

OILS WELL THAT ENDS WELL
After this, you’ll need to fill the hubs with oil. Using an Allen wrench, remove the small oil plug and fill the hub with 90-weight gear oil. Indicator lines on the cap show how much oil to put in. It’s that simple. Reinstall the oil plug, bolt the wheel back on and you’re ready to go.

We’ve tested the Turbo Lube hubs on several trips from Los Angeles to the Colorado River and back — about a five-hour tow each way through desert temperatures ranging up to 110 degrees Fahrenheit — and the hubs have proven to be both reliable and smooth. Plus, by simply looking at the transparent caps, we have the reassurance that the bearings have the right amount of oil and are being well lubricated.

Andyg
03-27-2007, 07:36 PM
Here is the actual address.

http://www.trailerboats.com/output.cfm?ID=967231

TMCNo1
03-27-2007, 07:44 PM
Here is the actual address.

http://www.trailerboats.com/output.cfm?ID=967231Thanks for all the info, I'll contact them too to see if they have retrofit disc brake hub/rotor assemblies to fit the UFP disc brake system.
Thanks again.

Workin' 4 Toys
03-27-2007, 11:12 PM
Thanks for all the info, I'll contact them too to see if they have retrofit disc brake hub/rotor assemblies to fit the UFP disc brake system.
Thanks again.
Do you "have" to convert to disc brakes with this setup?

TMCNo1
03-28-2007, 12:15 AM
Do you "have" to convert to disc brakes with this setup?I have disc brakes and according to the article, the see thru cap screws in and uses a O-ring seal. My hub/rotors do not have threads where the cap goes, as the Bearing Buddies/Trailer Buddies are press-in. I will have to change out to the threaded hub rotors and I need to know if their hub/rotor will work with the UFP calipers.
I would imagine the same would happen with drum brakes.

chevy08bud
03-28-2007, 09:40 AM
Thanks for all of the info. TMC#1, let us know what you find out about the Turbo Lube setup regarding aftermarket disc brakes, and factory drum brakes. Next time I redo my bearings, I think that this will be the way to go.

TMCNo1
03-29-2007, 02:33 PM
Ok guys, this is a mess,

Tie Down Engineering says.............The whole brake system to replace UFP systems, Disc or Drum brakes including actuator, hub/drum/backing plate/wheel cyninders or disc/rotor/calipers/brackets would be required, because their discs are 2 piece, not 1 piece and are not compatable with UFP calipers/ drum assemblies. Their see thru caps are threaded/o-ring and have a fill/drain hole in the cap which would not work with the UFP press-in Bearing Buddies/Trailer Buddy hubs. Would not quote a nominal price over the phone, call one of their dealers!

UFP (Unique Functional Products) says............... They have the new Trailrer Buddy rear oil seals and a press-in oil sight cap (no drain/fill hole) to retrofit to their vented hub/rotors only, but a hole must be drilled and tapped in the hub to use as a drain/fill hole and sealed with a screw. She would not quote a nominal retail price over the phone for me to post on TT, so call Cindy @ UFP, 1-800-835-9211 (Ext.11/C.S.), if you want a price.

According to all this, I just love my UFP/Trailer Buddy grease hubs!

Workin' 4 Toys
03-30-2007, 08:50 AM
tmcno1- What would drive you to consider these in the first place, are you having problems?

chevy08bud
03-30-2007, 09:43 AM
Well that sounds like a major PITA. So much for that idea. I originally asked the question to see how easy and cheap it would be to get this setup on my trailer. I have always thought that it would be nice to have minimal trailer bearing maintainence over packing and monitoring your bearings to make sure that everything is OK. On my parent's old boat, my mom was towing it home from the lake without my dad or I and the outer passenger side bearing failed and heated the axle up so much that it broke the hub off and the tire/wheel/hub went flying. Everyting turned out OK, although my dad and I had to go and put a new axle under the trailer in not the best of conditions, and obviously, I don't want for this to happen to my MC.

TMCNo1
03-30-2007, 10:02 AM
tmcno1- What would drive you to consider these in the first place, are you having problems?


No problems whatsoever, just curious about if it would be possible, without much trouble and cost. Also, somewhere along the line someone might be wondering the same thing and now the questions are basically answered for future reference.

Workin' 4 Toys
03-30-2007, 10:08 AM
I would think eventually someone will come up with a retrofit kit to suit your needs.
chevy08bud-
When doing a retro fit I would not think it is a solid sure bet it can't fail. There is a chance the lube could leak out and leave the hub high and dry and fail just and miserably as your example.
Although it is easier to check if the hubs are full of oil by looking, than it is to "see" if the hubs are greased.


Which reminds me, I better check the (grease) hubs on my trailer when I get home...:o

chevy08bud
03-30-2007, 10:17 AM
You're right, nothing is failsafe, just looking at one less thing to have to maintain. If the cap shows that there is good oil in there, then there is good oil in there, and I can proceede as planned. If it has no oil in it, or it looks like an oil milkshake, I probably ought to do something about it. Need to check the grease in mine as well. Happy trailering.