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MYMC
03-22-2007, 03:49 PM
NMMA files brief to ‘defend boating’

The National Marine Manufacturers Association today filed an amicus brief with the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, addressing the impact a recent federal court ruling on ballast water will have on recreational boats.

Under the September 2006 ruling, all ships that discharge ballast water must obtain a permit under the Clean Water Act. The ruling is intended to alleviate the problem of invasive species entering the nation’s waterways.

“It’s important for us, on behalf of the nation’s 72 million boaters, to inform the U.S. Court of Appeals of the unintended consequences of the ballast water decision,” said Monita Fontaine, the NMMA’s vice president and senior counsel of government relations.

Under the ruling, the EPA also is required to develop a permitting program for virtually all the 18 million recreational boats in the United States by September 2008.

“We are filing this brief to defend boating from an unprecedented, complex and costly permitting system,” said Fontaine. “Frankly, permitting recreational boats will not stop the spread of aquatic invasive species. The threat from invasive species needs to be dealt with realistically, by stopping their introduction through commercial shipping ballast water long before those ships enter U.S. waters.”

Cargo ships use ballast water to compensate for weight changes as they load and unload cargo, and then pump out the water as needed. But many aquatic species are transported in ballast water, then dumped into foreign waters. These aquatic hitchhikers can wreak environmental havoc. Zebra mussels, which were transported to the Great Lakes by ballast water, have clogged intake valves and caused other headaches for boaters and residents.

The NMMA also wants to see the ballast water issue addressed as it relates to foreign invasive species because of the damage they cause to the aquatic environment and native fish species.

“The boating community is doing its part through our strong support for legislation that would stop the introduction and spread of invasive species,” said NMMA president Thom Dammrich. “We have also invested in outreach and awareness campaigns to educate current and prospective boaters about how they can do their part to not inadvertently spread invasive species that have been introduced through ballast water.”

Monte
03-22-2007, 03:59 PM
NMMA files brief to ‘defend boating’

The National Marine Manufacturers Association today filed an amicus brief with the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, addressing the impact a recent federal court ruling on ballast water will have on recreational boats.

Under the September 2006 ruling, all ships that discharge ballast water must obtain a permit under the Clean Water Act. The ruling is intended to alleviate the problem of invasive species entering the nation’s waterways.

“It’s important for us, on behalf of the nation’s 72 million boaters, to inform the U.S. Court of Appeals of the unintended consequences of the ballast water decision,” said Monita Fontaine, the NMMA’s vice president and senior counsel of government relations.

Under the ruling, the EPA also is required to develop a permitting program for virtually all the 18 million recreational boats in the United States by September 2008.

“We are filing this brief to defend boating from an unprecedented, complex and costly permitting system,” said Fontaine. “Frankly, permitting recreational boats will not stop the spread of aquatic invasive species. The threat from invasive species needs to be dealt with realistically, by stopping their introduction through commercial shipping ballast water long before those ships enter U.S. waters.”

Cargo ships use ballast water to compensate for weight changes as they load and unload cargo, and then pump out the water as needed. But many aquatic species are transported in ballast water, then dumped into foreign waters. These aquatic hitchhikers can wreak environmental havoc. Zebra mussels, which were transported to the Great Lakes by ballast water, have clogged intake valves and caused other headaches for boaters and residents.

The NMMA also wants to see the ballast water issue addressed as it relates to foreign invasive species because of the damage they cause to the aquatic environment and native fish species.

“The boating community is doing its part through our strong support for legislation that would stop the introduction and spread of invasive species,” said NMMA president Thom Dammrich. “We have also invested in outreach and awareness campaigns to educate current and prospective boaters about how they can do their part to not inadvertently spread invasive species that have been introduced through ballast water.”


Sounds like it is time for one of the engineers out there to invent an intake/ output filter system... and make a couple mil... Just remember me when you do.;)

RexDog1
03-22-2007, 04:12 PM
Thanks Monte

I am on it!!!!!!!!!:D

Monte
03-22-2007, 04:19 PM
Thanks Monte

I am on it!!!!!!!!!:D

Just remember the last statement:rolleyes: I'll gladly accept royalty checks;)

Upper Michigan Prostar190
03-22-2007, 04:39 PM
((((I am gonna get SO rich on that filter idea that MOnte had:) :) ))))

RexDog1
03-22-2007, 04:55 PM
Just remember the last statement:rolleyes: I'll gladly accept royalty checks;)


50/50 my friend :toast:

WakeSeeky
03-22-2007, 05:06 PM
Sounds like it is time for one of the engineers out there to invent an intake/ output filter system... and make a couple mil... Just remember me when you do.;)

I would love it if someone did, sadly we're learning far more about invasive mussels recently than I'd ever hoped to know. Quagga were recently discovered in Mead, so boat cleaning has turned into boat decontamination. My understanding is they can't survive in the engine because of the heat, but we are currently being asked to clean our bilge every time we pull the boat and I'm sure this is going to become mandatory in the near future. FYI for anyone thinking about it, the little beasties are microscopic in their larval stage. :(

Actually, we were curious about the ballast tanks. We really don't use ours much, since we foil and I haven't gotten around to calling our dealer. MYMC, do you know if there's a way to clean out a ballast tank? Unfortunately, I could easily see water ballast being outlawed here unless there's a way to clean out the tanks. I think it will also take a lot of effort by wakeboat owners and other concerned parties to argue that it can be responsibly handled. It's too easy to just say "You can't do it" and there's a pretty high freak-out level associated with this around here right now. :twocents:

3event
03-22-2007, 05:17 PM
Those of us who live adjacent to the Great Lakes have been hearing about this issue for years. Most likely cause for many invasive species problems.

Maybe we need inline UV sterilization for ballast water, it works in homes. I wonder how much current those lamps need though.

The guys selling lead might get quite busy...

PendO
03-22-2007, 06:46 PM
well, guess we may get familiar with the "wakeplate" ... nice patent royalties:)

River Rat
03-22-2007, 07:32 PM
I would think Bleach would kill just about anything

WTRSK1R
03-22-2007, 09:04 PM
I agree that bleach is a potential solution. I know to sanitize when homebrewing it only takes a couple ounces of bleach with 5 gallons of water to sanitize the fermentation container.

Steve

BCBlazers
03-22-2007, 11:19 PM
redirect your discharge through the bottom of the boat. it aint illegal till ya get caught...

Monte
03-23-2007, 08:53 AM
50/50 my friend :toast:

Works for me:) thanks!!:cool:

MYMC
03-23-2007, 09:24 AM
I would love it if someone did, sadly we're learning far more about invasive mussels recently than I'd ever hoped to know. Quagga were recently discovered in Mead, so boat cleaning has turned into boat decontamination. My understanding is they can't survive in the engine because of the heat, but we are currently being asked to clean our bilge every time we pull the boat and I'm sure this is going to become mandatory in the near future. FYI for anyone thinking about it, the little beasties are microscopic in their larval stage. :(

Actually, we were curious about the ballast tanks. We really don't use ours much, since we foil and I haven't gotten around to calling our dealer. MYMC, do you know if there's a way to clean out a ballast tank? Unfortunately, I could easily see water ballast being outlawed here unless there's a way to clean out the tanks. I think it will also take a lot of effort by wakeboat owners and other concerned parties to argue that it can be responsibly handled. It's too easy to just say "You can't do it" and there's a pretty high freak-out level associated with this around here right now. :twocents:
The only way to clean the tanks would be through the winteriztion port. I would think a solution of bleach water combined with flushing the tank should elminate any issues. However, that is a "common sense" approach and as we all know when goverment becomes involved common sense goes out the window.

beatle78
03-23-2007, 10:52 AM
hmmm.... That sounds like it could solve half the problem but what affect would the bleach have when discharged into the lake water?

WakeSeeky
03-23-2007, 11:05 AM
The only way to clean the tanks would be through the winteriztion port. I would think a solution of bleach water combined with flushing the tank should elminate any issues. However, that is a "common sense" approach and as we all know when goverment becomes involved common sense goes out the window.

Thanks for the info. Yup, a mild solution of bleach and water will kill them... just didn't know how to flush the ballast tanks. We, uh, don't winterize, so I didn't know there were ports. :o And yes, my concern is that the government solution will be to just ban the ballast rather than look for workable alternatives.

beatle, we don't flush into the lake. For the moment, we pull the boat through a car wash and wash everything down with soap and hot water. In the not-too-distant future, there will be pressure wash stations at the lake. Anyone want to guess how busy that's going to get on a summer weekend? :(

Jesus_Freak
03-23-2007, 11:33 AM
hmmm.... That sounds like it could solve half the problem but what affect would the bleach have when discharged into the lake water?

What about the new NaCl-based purification systems on swimming pools? That would probably be environmentally reasonable?.?.?

WakeSeeky
03-23-2007, 11:44 AM
redirect your discharge through the bottom of the boat. it aint illegal till ya get caught...

The point is to keep the things from colonizing my boat. No way I'm going to let water collect where it can't be flushed. And since my tax dollars are going to be paying for all this, I also believe it isn't in my best interest to help them spread.

Personally, we'll pull our ballast system if it's banned and not miss it. We occasionally use it to put some weight up front in choppy water, but I doubt we'll use it even for that now that it has to be flushed. However, I would MUCH rather see boat owners responsibly deal with the problem than see the government step in and take away the option. :twocents:

M-Funf
03-23-2007, 12:13 PM
I just got a letter from the CA department of F&G warning about Quagga mussles, which have been found now in Mead, Havasu, and one other SoCal lake.

They are urging boaters to completely drain and dry the bilge, live tanks, etc. before putting the boat in another body of water.

Ballast tanks will be a breeding groud for these critters unless you can either prevent them from getting in or out, or kill them before discharging ballast. I would opt for the prevention of letting them in. Maybe a fresh water transfer station on shore for filling tanks? Like fueling an airplane. Launch the boat, hook up a 4" hose to a fill port on the boat, fill, and go...Then, the ballast could be discharged into the lake at the end of the day since it's clean...

WakeSeeky
03-23-2007, 04:35 PM
Maybe a fresh water transfer station on shore for filling tanks? Like fueling an airplane. Launch the boat, hook up a 4" hose to a fill port on the boat, fill, and go...Then, the ballast could be discharged into the lake at the end of the day since it's clean...

That's one of the best ideas I've heard. I have no idea if it's practical or not, but it makes a lot of sense. I wonder who you would contact to suggest that? I know it's mostly internet chatter, but there are some seriously loony tunes ideas out there for containing the quagga. I just don't know how a good idea might get communicated to someone who could do something about it? :confused: