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View Full Version : Where to Install Zinc Annodes?


andrewtimko
03-21-2007, 08:03 AM
I recently bought a set of Zinc sacrificial annodes for my 1994 Prostar 190. The set included:

1 Shaft Annode
7 round & flat annodes, that are to be sandwiched over metal.

My question is where and how to install them. I assume the will get installed on.

1,2: Swim Platform Supports
3: Rudder
4: 5, 6, Tracking Fins
7: ???, Strut?

A. How high on the shaft would you strap on the shaft annode?

B. I assume I have to drill the other equipment to hold the other annodes? Any suggestions on where? Just bore a hole through the tracking fins? Sounds kind of scary.

Thanks,
AT

TMCNo1
03-21-2007, 11:13 AM
I recently bought a set of Zinc sacrificial annodes for my 1994 Prostar 190. The set included:

1 Shaft Annode
7 round & flat annodes, that are to be sandwiched over metal.

My question is where and how to install them. I assume the will get installed on.

1,2: Swim Platform Supports
3: Rudder
4: 5, 6, Tracking Fins
7: ???, Strut?

A. How high on the shaft would you strap on the shaft annode?

B. I assume I have to drill the other equipment to hold the other annodes? Any suggestions on where? Just bore a hole through the tracking fins? Sounds kind of scary.

Thanks,
AT


Do you use the boat in saltwater only? Saltwater is more problematic than fresh water when it comes to using zinc anodes as a sacrificial metal. If fresh water only, zinc anodes are not normally required because the scarificed metal on the prop and rudder is not that noticeable as compared to saltwater.

andrewtimko
03-21-2007, 11:53 AM
Unfortunatly, the closest water to me is salt. I just want to be proactive before subjecting the boat to that water.

JimN
03-21-2007, 12:14 PM
If you don't keep the boat in the water, I'm not sure you'll need them. Sterndrives need them because aluminum is a reactive metal and is depleted faster but bronze is more "noble".

This is a quote from http://gulffishing.com/tips_anode.html

"The hull material of a boat determines, in part, which anode material to use. A fiberglass boat having an inboard engine with bronze and stainless metal parts needs less protection than an aluminum hull or a boat with an aluminum sterndrive.

Aluminum alloy is the only anode material that is safe for use in all types of water and accepted by the major sterndrive manufacturers as the best material to use. It is lighter and protects better than zinc and is not so active that it becomes dangerous like magnesium. Aluminum alloy is also environmentally friendly, unlike zinc, which is considered a pollutant."

If you drill holes in your tracking fins and install anodes, they'll stop being tracking fins.

TMCNo1
03-21-2007, 12:16 PM
Unfortunatly, the closest water to me is salt. I just want to be proactive before subjecting the boat to that water.


I'll send you a PM.

River Rat
03-21-2007, 01:08 PM
If you mount one on the shaft won't that cause vibration issues :confused:

TMCNo1
03-21-2007, 01:12 PM
If you mount one on the shaft won't that cause vibration issues :confused:
They are egg shaped and the 2 halves are bolted together in front of the strut and any imbalance of the anode that close to the shaft would never be noticed.

TMCNo1
03-21-2007, 01:15 PM
They are egg shaped and the 2 halves are bolted together in front of the strut and any imbalance of the anode that close to the shaft would never be noticed.
Check this out,http://www.boatzincs.com/shaft.html

mayo93prostar
03-21-2007, 01:35 PM
I recently bought a 93 prostar that has been used in saltwater most of the time. there are no anodes on it and there is little or no corrosion on any of the metal running gear. the boat is now always trailered and it was always stored on a lift before I got it. if you are not going to leave it in the water, you can probably get away without any anodes or just put one on the rudder.

Upper Michigan Prostar190
03-21-2007, 02:14 PM
Interesting reading! I love this technical stuff. reminds me of high school chemistry. JimN, you mentioned that Magnesium can become dangerous as an anode. I am curious why? :confused: Could you expand on that one please?

Ryan
03-21-2007, 05:24 PM
I have one on my drive shaft only. I wouln't do the rudder or the tracking fins to preserve performance.

I'd do some more homework before puting them on the aluminum brackets on the swim platform. IIRC they react differently when anodes are applied - I'm not sure using them helps in the same way as steal where the electrical current produced is expelled to and through the discharging anode as electrons are kicked off whole zinc molecules go right along since they need a ballanced outer valence shell. Aluminum on the other hand, as it oxidizes/corrodes builds up a protective layer on itself. The word Al silicate comes to mind...go try wikipedia ICBW. Just make sure the zinc and Al together don't accelerate the process.

JimN
03-21-2007, 10:04 PM
UMP- Magnesium is highly reactive and when it comes into contact with salt water, it really goes nuts. The bubbles that come from the reaction are hydrogen and are highly explosive. Same reason lead/acid batteries have a warning on them about sparks and open flame- the bubbles that form during the charging cycle are hydrogen, too.

Splash
07-29-2010, 09:15 AM
any idea how to wire one of those?

X2SS
http://www.onlyinboards.com/image.aspx?ImageID=40548

I'm looking to install one on my X1.

JimN
07-29-2010, 09:58 AM
any idea how to wire one of those?

X2SS
http://www.onlyinboards.com/image.aspx?ImageID=40548

I'm looking to install one on my X1.

Why do you want to install one? Are you using the boat in salt water? It's not a stern-drive, made of aluminum, which is more reactive than stainless or bronze.

Splash
07-30-2010, 02:22 AM
Yes I'm using the boat in SaltWater, in the Mediterranean Sea. My mechanics installed all the anodes, excepting that one. I was wondering if it is wired to the engine or to the external parts of the transom, like platform brackets, exhaust tips, or what so ever.

Dball
07-30-2010, 11:24 AM
I have an 86 S&S and I run in saltwater. I don't have any and I don't have any issues. The boat sits on the trailer but I will leave it in the water for long weekends.

51timber
04-06-2013, 05:45 PM
2 questions.

1. If I use my 2003 X30 in salt once in a while and the same day run it in fresh water for about 5 minutes do I need sacrificial zinc anodes???

2. If yes where should I get them and where do they go???
Thanks for the feed back.

JimN
04-06-2013, 07:18 PM
2 questions.

1. If I use my 2003 X30 in salt once in a while and the same day run it in fresh water for about 5 minutes do I need sacrificial zinc anodes???

2. If yes where should I get them and where do they go???
Thanks for the feed back.

Zinc is less "noble" than aluminum but with bronze and stainless, you really don't need them.

Traxx822
04-06-2013, 07:33 PM
2 questions.

1. If I use my 2003 X30 in salt once in a while and the same day run it in fresh water for about 5 minutes do I need sacrificial zinc anodes???

2. If yes where should I get them and where do they go???
Thanks for the feed back.

I took mine out for a weekend last year in salt water. I left it in the water all weekend (about 4 days) and then when we leave I tow it to a local inland lake and let it run for 20 min or so and let it warm up etc etc. I brought it back to the mechanic to check it out, he said he couldn't even tell it was in salt water.

I think for one day you will be fine. I do suggest you hose off or dunk your trailer over and over again. Thats the part that will get ruined. Not so much your boat.