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View Full Version : Antifouling Good or Bad?????


dh_bennison
03-19-2007, 04:24 PM
Hi,

I have a 96 205 Sammy Prostar, which is going to live on the water from April until October this year as their is no slipway and the boat has to be craned in and out.

I would like to know people thoughts on Antifouling, ie what are the good points and what are the drawbacks? Does it help prevent blistering? Why don't more people have MCs antifouled (I have only ever seen one other that has been). Then again I am in the UK.

Thanks

rodltg2
03-19-2007, 04:27 PM
whats antifouling?

JohnnyB
03-19-2007, 04:29 PM
Rod, he's referring to antifouling paint which prevents growth of algae, staining, etc........beyond that, I know nothing about it.

dh_bennison
03-19-2007, 04:52 PM
Yep thats the stuff, its used alot to prevent marine growth and alge etc. It costs about 350 ($650) you can half the price if you do it yourself but I dont have any way of suspending the boat in the air and I can not be bothered rigging somthing together. Now I consider this a small costs if it protects the hull and saves me having to spend hours cleaning etc.

However Im sure their are some drawbacks otherwise I carnt see why everyone who has a boat on the water doesnt do it

cbryan70
03-19-2007, 04:55 PM
is this just like bottom paint? if it is, makes it tougher to sell your boat from what i have heard, and ive also heard it may hurt your top speed. Not sure about the second one but ive heard that

bigmac
03-19-2007, 05:03 PM
It is bottom paint. DuPont Imron is commonly used - a polyurethane enamel. It acts as an imperious barrier to the water. That's important because gel coat is porous and water will osmotically seep through it and cause blistering. Blistering is not covered by MasterCraft under their warranty and re-gelcoating a hull ain't cheap.

MasterCraft recommends anti-fouling paint for their hulls when the boat is left in the water, salt water or fresh water, for extended period of time.

From a recent thread here...here's a boat that was moored without anti-fouling paint (http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=317725&postcount=30). Not that it happens to every boat...just some of 'em...

dh_bennison
03-19-2007, 06:01 PM
So does it protect from blistering as well as alge etc?

Why does it knock value off your boat?

Thanks:D

JohnnyB
03-19-2007, 06:08 PM
I would expect it would devalue any boat in the states....not sure about elsewhere. Can you get a lift to get it out of the water??

bigmac
03-19-2007, 06:11 PM
So does it protect from blistering as well as alge etc?

Why does it knock value off your boat?

Thanks:D

There are 2 different types of bottom paints - anti-fouling paint and barrier paint. Anti-fouling is actually biocidal and keeps marine growth down by killing it. That's usually necessary for salt water boats because of the aggressive marine critters, and that's why most salt water boats of whatever size use anti-fouling paint. Fresh water boats may only get algae/slime so the hull doesn't need to be biocidal, just slick enough for algae not to stick, so barrier paint is recommended for that purpose and to seal the gel coat so it won't blister.

Gelcoat is nice stuff. It's application is uniform and it's really durable and resistant to a lot of the things that make paint unattractive like scrapes, scuffs, scratches. Around here, paint on a fiberglass sport boat detracts from its value in the same way that repainting an auto does.

Jerseydave
03-19-2007, 08:22 PM
Hi,

I have a 96 205 Sammy Prostar, which is going to live on the water from April until October this year as their is no slipway and the boat has to be craned in and out.

I would like to know people thoughts on Antifouling, ie what are the good points and what are the drawbacks? Does it help prevent blistering? Why don't more people have MCs antifouled (I have only ever seen one other that has been). Then again I am in the UK.

Thanks

Not sure what a "slipway" is, but my choice for leaving a boat in the water would be to invest in a boat lift. I know a guy who put bottom paint on his Malibu, sold it one year later for about $5k less than he should have if it was never painted.

There are many types of boat lifts out there in all price ranges. Airdock is one of the least expensive, I believe.

dh_bennison
03-20-2007, 04:37 AM
Slipway is a launching ramp where you can back your boat into the water on the trailer.

Unfortunatly the guy who owns the dock would not let me put a lift in. Also they are very very very expensive in the UK as their is not much demand for them.

sizzler
03-20-2007, 07:38 AM
dave......have regularly left the boat in the water for a week at a time....no issues with blistering.....but as to leaving it in a whole season...i am not sure........what do knottingley or oxford recommend....i assume you are leaving it in fresh water.....i would not anti-foul it...it will get scummy...but i have seen antifouled boats with scum on them.......

give mark or martin a call on 01865 343332 or 07971666975

or e-mail them......www.theskiboatzone.co.uk

Evan Jones
03-20-2007, 07:49 AM
I don't know what the trigger is, it must be something in the water, or something in the gelcoat process. Like someone else said, three boats at the same dock, and only one gets blisters. My '97 sat in the water all summer, every summer for the first 7 years. I got sick of scrubbing the waterline off, and I got worried about blisters so I got a lift finally. Luckily I have no blisters to this day. Good batch of gelcoat or good water ? I wish I knew !

H20skeefreek
03-20-2007, 08:23 AM
Bigmac, could you give an example of a "barrier paint"? I sell bottom paint and don't really know what you are referring to. I would assume that you are referring to "thin film" paints such as Interlux vc17m? But this does still contain a biocide, Biolux, and is recommended for trailered or lift boats, not boats that stay in the water all the time.

DH, I would recommend a paint such as VC offshore from Interlux. While it is recommended for saltwater boats, it's one of the few that will have a "slick" finish so to not rob you of speed and performance. It is not cheap. A less expensive alternative would be Fiberglass Bottomkote, also from Interlux or Trinidad SR from Pettit. How often will you be able to pull the boat out for recoat? At least once a season? Some of these paints will last longer than that, but keep in mind that all will require recoating after one or a few seasons.

check out the manufacturer websites:

www.pettitpaints.com (http://www.pettitpaints.com)

www.interlux.com (http://www.interlux.com)

http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/categoryg/10001/-1/10001/229/11204/4/man/asc/0/grid West Marine's paints are manufactured by pettit and have a lower price tag, BUT international shipping will make it cost prohibitive, and you can buy the interlux and pettit from you local marine store.....er "chandlery". But West Marine's website is a GREAT resource in picking what you want.

bigmac
03-20-2007, 09:17 AM
Bigmac, could you give an example of a "barrier paint"? I sell bottom paint and don't really know what you are referring to. I would assume that you are referring to "thin film" paints such as Interlux vc17m? But this does still contain a biocide, Biolux, and is recommended for trailered or lift boats, not boats that stay in the water all the time.

Most of the barrier paints are epoxy, some are polyurethane. The VC Performance Epoxy (http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product/10001/-1/10001/72286/10001/229/11204/4)that Interlux makes would be appropriate, for example. Another commonly used fresh-water anti-blister coating is DuPont's Imron.

H20skeefreek
03-20-2007, 06:28 PM
vc performance is for dry stacked and trailer boats, and Imron will work, but is an automotive paint.

Silverfish
04-15-2007, 07:33 PM
I've owned two Mastercrafts with a new one on the way. They all spend six months of the year on the sea and I honestly think you'd be mad not to anti-foul your boat. If you get it done professionally it doesn't detract from the look of the boat and I have never had any issues selling the boats (or part-ex'ing them) because they were anti fouled. If you don't anti-foul them I would recommend pulling the boat out of the water every couple of weeks to jet wash any algae build up but frankly that's a pain in the arse.

dh_bennison
04-16-2007, 09:01 AM
Thanks silverfish.

I have just put my boat back on the water without Anti Foul. But I am thinking of pulling it out in May when I am on holiday and having it done then.

If you dont mind me asking how much have you paid for having an MC Antifouled? I have been quoted approx 300 by my local boat yard in Preston.

Cheers
Dave

Evan Jones
04-16-2007, 10:55 AM
Has anyone figured out if it's the stuff in the water that causes blistering, or a difference in gelcoat application or quality ? My boat sat in the water all summer for 7 years with no blistering. My buddies boat just down the lake from me has slight blistering, and then you see pictures here of entire bottoms covered in blisters. Seems like our upholstery splitting issue-bad batches of gelcoat ??

sizzler
04-16-2007, 11:03 AM
I've owned two Mastercrafts with a new one on the way. They all spend six months of the year on the sea and I honestly think you'd be mad not to anti-foul your boat. If you get it done professionally it doesn't detract from the look of the boat and I have never had any issues selling the boats (or part-ex'ing them) because they were anti fouled. If you don't anti-foul them I would recommend pulling the boat out of the water every couple of weeks to jet wash any algae build up but frankly that's a pain in the arse.

silverfish.....welcome to the board.....where abouts do you boat???

Diesel
04-16-2007, 01:07 PM
Has anyone figured out if it's the stuff in the water that causes blistering, or a difference in gelcoat application or quality ? My boat sat in the water all summer for 7 years with no blistering. My buddies boat just down the lake from me has slight blistering, and then you see pictures here of entire bottoms covered in blisters. Seems like our upholstery splitting issue-bad batches of gelcoat ??

This explains it. http://www.yachtsurvey.com/blisters.htm

It's been a while since I read everything but IIRC it has to do with chopper mat used between the woven glass and the gel coat.

Evan Jones
04-16-2007, 01:16 PM
Thanks, I guess MC was using better resin back in '97 ?? You'd think they would want to use the best resin possible ?

The simple fact is that hull blistering is caused by the use of inferior materials and shoddy layup. As Lee Dana, former head of engineering at Bertram Yachts told the audience at the annual conference of the National Association of Marine Surveyors in 1985, hulls built with high quality resins don't blister. If builders want to build hulls that don't blister, all they have to do is "spend another ten dollars per gallon for resin," he said

Diesel
04-16-2007, 01:52 PM
Thanks, I guess MC was using better resin back in '97 ?? You'd think they would want to use the best resin possible ?

The simple fact is that hull blistering is caused by the use of inferior materials and shoddy layup. As Lee Dana, former head of engineering at Bertram Yachts told the audience at the annual conference of the National Association of Marine Surveyors in 1985, hulls built with high quality resins don't blister. If builders want to build hulls that don't blister, all they have to do is "spend another ten dollars per gallon for resin," he said

That's one component and somewhere in there they correlate the change in mfg processes where chopper matt is used to prevent bleed through of the woven glass on the gel coat. I guess you could conclude it is a combination of both.:o

wakescene
04-16-2007, 03:31 PM
I hate to antifoul....er bottompaint but I boat in saltwater and you would be a fool not to in saltwater or brackish water. Bottompainting is a thankless, backbreaking, no fun dirty job that costs a lot of money. Not to mention the zinc's required for most saltwater boaters adds $30-$100 to the cost of the job at least once during the season.

My $.02...
I use the Interlux ACT Ablative bottomkote paint. About $125/gal and washes off clean at the end of the season basically ready for paint the next with almost no prep. Sweetness

Sodar
04-16-2007, 03:38 PM
I would try to get white bottom paint if I had to use bottom paint on a skiboat. I used it on my old Boston Whaler. California does not allow the stuff, because of their stringent Enviro policies, so I had to drive into Arizona to get it. It did look better than the black though, because when it began to wear thin from scrubbing, you did not see the white bottom poking through, but rather white on white, so it hid it a little better.

CarlosCabanas
04-16-2007, 09:06 PM
So antifouling is bad for the environment??? Here we go again.....


What is the best antifouling? I'm guessing the Interlux?

Carlos

Silverfish
05-14-2007, 08:10 AM
silverfish.....welcome to the board.....where abouts do you boat???
Thanks for the welcome, Plymouth UK

Silverfish
05-14-2007, 08:14 AM
Thanks silverfish.

I have just put my boat back on the water without Anti Foul. But I am thinking of pulling it out in May when I am on holiday and having it done then.

If you dont mind me asking how much have you paid for having an MC Antifouled? I have been quoted approx £300 by my local boat yard in Preston.

Cheers
Dave
Due to some timing issues and delays with the delivery of the new boat the X2 has actually gone on the water without anti-foul. I shall pull her out mid-season and see how she's doing. Let's say it's an experiment - would never have considered doing it previously but am desperate to get out and had already lost nearly 2 months of the season. The dealer has assured me it will be OK...

Anti-fouling for £300 sounds about right.