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86mcskier
03-16-2007, 01:57 PM
I got a quote today from a detailer for $400 - $500 to remove the boat from the trailer, and buff out all the gel from top to bottom with 3M products. Is this high, low, or average? Also, about how much could I do this for myself if I bought all the products needed to buff. Also, I have never used a high speed buffer before, but I have heard it isn't as difficult as it sounds.

shepherd
03-16-2007, 02:37 PM
I spent less than $200 for tools, materials and supplies (including $79 buffer, pads, compound, etc.), to buff, polish and wax my boat. Plus, I still own the buffer, which I can use on my other boat. Took me about 8 hours total to do the job, so I guess it depends on how much your time is worth and whether you would get any enjoyment or satisfaction doing it yourself. It's a fairly easy job with the right tools.

Edit: The above didn't include removing boat from trailer and buffing the bottom. I didn't do anything on the hull below the chine.

east tx skier
03-16-2007, 03:22 PM
I paid my glass guy $250 to fix a gouge in my father in law's boat. He buffed it top to bottom for free. Having your dealer detail a boat is expensive given their hourly rates. I've always had better luck getting that sort of thing done by a local shop who does little or nothing other than that sort of thing.

86mcskier
03-16-2007, 03:27 PM
Thanks for the feedback. I think I will just do it myself.

krtrcr
03-16-2007, 03:59 PM
If you do it yourself, how do you deal with the area where the boat sits on the trailer?

shepherd
03-16-2007, 04:41 PM
If you do it yourself, how do you deal with the area where the boat sits on the trailer?

Don't worry about that part. Nobody ever sees it anyways! :D

atlfootr
03-16-2007, 04:52 PM
I got a quote today from a detailer for $400 - $500 to remove the boat from the trailer, and buff out all the gel from top to bottom with 3M products. Is this high, low, or average? Also, about how much could I do this for myself if I bought all the products needed to buff. Also, I have never used a high speed buffer before, but I have heard it isn't as difficult as it sounds.Shep,

Don't forget to mention, DON'T USE HIGH SPEEDS! :noface:
YOU WILL BURN THE GELCOAT ...
Normally at 2-3 settings is were I leave mine .
And if you can get access to someone's boat lift for a couple hours, that's even better.
Good Luck, take pictures for us -- before and after :wavey:

shepherd
03-16-2007, 05:32 PM
I've had my buffer up to 2500 rpm for some difficult spots without any ill effects that I could see. The instructions I had I think said to run at 1500 - 2000 rpm, which was plenty. Unlike automotive finishes (I'd never use the circular buffer on my car), the gel coat is pretty tuff stuff.

atlfootr
03-16-2007, 05:42 PM
I've had my buffer up to 2500 rpm for some difficult spots without any ill effects that I could see. The instructions I had I think said to run at 1500 - 2000 rpm, which was plenty. Unlike automotive finishes (I'd never use the circular buffer on my car), the gel coat is pretty tuff stuff.right 1500 - 2000 rpm = out to the 2nd and 3rd setting on mine.
That was enough :D