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Putter
03-14-2007, 02:55 PM
There are a few small knicks in the back corners of the gel coat in the colored areas and a couple knicks in the front of the hull as well. Anyone have any experience in gel coat repair that could give me some advice on what kind of repair kit works best to match color and just some basic tips in general to help me through the process or if its even worth trying to fix myself?

east tx skier
03-14-2007, 03:02 PM
If it's not too deep, you might be able to wet sand it out. You can see what colors MC used here (http://www.spectrumcolor.com/catalog.htm). If it's white you need, then just buying the OEM stuff may not be enough. As time creates a whole 'nother shade of white.

Beyond that, I don't know much as I have a guy who I would pay to do that kind of stuff for me. I'd mess it up. I know there are others who feel perfectly comfortable taking a project like that on.

cwright
03-15-2007, 11:17 AM
I had to make some Gelcoat repairs last year. A first time event for me, so my learning curve was pretty steep. I picked up a gel coat repair kit at a marine store, the one that comes with about 6, maybe 8 tubes of color, a tube of resin and a tube of hardner. The kit has all the instructions you need, but you baiscally add color to the amount of resin you need to fill a gouge, and play with the color combos until you get as close to possible to your color. I was matching gray so it was easy, mix black and white until it matched. Once your color is good you add hardner per the instructions, (it's just a few drops), and stir it up real good. Then apply and let harden. It dries or hardens like a rock, so you want to careful not to apply too much material. You might be able to use a plastic putty scraper, but leave the material a little high. Once hard, I used a palm sized orbiter sander (which had pointed tips) first with sand paper, (because I had too much material on), then wet and dry on sander, then a foam pad on sander which really worked well. Then polishing compound by hand, then wax with a buffer wheel. The end result was pretty impressive. No scratches, and a pretty good color match. The whole process took a couple of hours. Good luck. Post some pics with your before and afters.

TMCNo1
03-15-2007, 11:40 AM
I had to make some Gelcoat repairs last year. A first time event for me, so my learning curve was pretty steep. I picked up a gel coat repair kit at a marine store, the one that comes with about 6, maybe 8 tubes of color, a tube of resin and a tube of hardner. The kit has all the instructions you need, but you baiscally add color to the amount of resin you need to fill a gouge, and play with the color combos until you get as close to possible to your color. I was matching gray so it was easy, mix black and white until it matched. Once your color is good you add hardner per the instructions, (it's just a few drops), and stir it up real good. Then apply and let harden. It dries or hardens like a rock, so you want to careful not to apply too much material. You might be able to use a plastic putty scraper, but leave the material a little high. Once hard, I used a palm sized orbiter sander (which had pointed tips) first with sand paper, (because I had too much material on), then wet and dry on sander, then a foam pad on sander which really worked well. Then polishing compound by hand, then wax with a buffer wheel. The end result was pretty impressive. No scratches, and a pretty good color match. The whole process took a couple of hours. Good luck. Post some pics with your before and afters.

Anyone interested,
One tip to always remember, when mixing colors to match a existing color, be it paint or gelcoat, always mix it about 1/4 color lighter than what you are repairing, because when most color finishes dry, they will dry a tad darker than what you mix!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Rich_G
03-15-2007, 12:20 PM
Here is a place to get factory matched color:
http://www.spectrumcolor.com/

I have not used them yet; I still am working on some of my big projects..., interior, ballast, bimini, Perfect Pass, before I get to the little cosmetic stuff. You can also get your exact factory color codes by emailing:
tmcsupport_35617439@mastercraft.com

you need to supply your hull ID #

Putter
03-15-2007, 03:06 PM
Perfect thanks for all the info. gel coat repair is coming up in about a month so i figured i should get some info on it now and get the product together. right now im too busy refurbing my trailer, building new dash panels, recarpeting the boat, re-upholstering everything, re-wiring the whole boat, and building a new seat for the rear of the boat so I can put in 2 batteries. Minor projects, you know how one small project snowballs and you all of a sudden have a boat that you were going to just do a few things to and now its like new and cost you an arm and a leg... Sounds like every mastercraft woner I know hahaha

Matt L.
03-17-2007, 09:17 AM
Depending on the age the Sepctrum stuff should match pretty close. My 1990 240sc was still close. The my red was a bit darker and "bluer" than the stuff I got from spectrum. I suspect that is due to age and UV damage. Go to :

www.fiberglass-repair.com

He has some pretty good advice, I'm going to buy his DVD.

Later,

Matt

TMCNo1
03-18-2007, 06:57 PM
Depending on the age the Sepctrum stuff should match pretty close. My 1990 240sc was still close. The my red was a bit darker and "bluer" than the stuff I got from spectrum. I suspect that is due to age and UV damage. Go to :

www.fiberglass-repair.com

He has some pretty good advice, I'm going to buy his DVD.

Later,

Matt


Even though you buy from Spectrum, you can buy a multi-color gelcoat kit from a boat dealer/marine supply and use the colors to mix into the Spectrum to get it to match closer.

pilot02
03-28-2007, 03:32 PM
I found some helpful info at the site listed below as well....

http://www.fibreglast.com/contentpages-Learning-Center-286.html

PE4ME
04-03-2007, 03:10 PM
I went the spectrum route because of volume...not cheap but quality. The match was nearly perfect even though the UV does take its toll. I would mix with a kit to do small repairs, take your time with the color and the process and it is really not that bad. Definitely leave a little higher and I would use a sanding block to keep things flat...like most sites indicate, start with a low grit and work your way up. Seems scary with low grit but by the time you get to polishing compound you're good to go.