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dmayer84
03-11-2007, 03:16 PM
Well its just about time to pull the boat out and get it ready for the season. What are peoples reccomendations for a buffer, pads and wax?

I'm not going to do it by hand anymore like I did with my old boat.

bigmac
03-11-2007, 03:17 PM
Well its just about time to pull the boat out and get it ready for the season. What are peoples reccomendations for a buffer, pads and wax?

I'm not going to do it by hand anymore like I did with my old boat.

My recommendation is ANY buffer and ANY pad, as long as it's in the hands of a professional detailer.

cmack
03-14-2007, 02:59 PM
I'm assuming normal auto wax is ok. I have alwave loved Meguiars #26. Super easy on and off without the buffer (for an auto).
I have used the quick wax on the boat. but noticed the 26 provided much better color even on the new boat.
Is there a good reason to use the marine wax? Again I'm assuming it might last longer.

School Skier
03-14-2007, 03:17 PM
Last year I used a special 3M product for oxidation and they recomended a wool buffing pad. The boat looked like when I bought it in 97.

SDAhockey21
03-14-2007, 03:31 PM
How long did it last?

dwvktm450
03-14-2007, 04:09 PM
I have used Meguiars premium Marine Wax with very good results. As far as a buffer goes, I would recommend an orbital polisher over a traditional buffer for waxing and polishing. A buffer is overkill and possibly dangerous if you do not know what you are doing. I only use a buffer if I absolutely have to.

I have used Meguiar's Paint Sealant on cars, and want to know if anyone has used this on a boat. Does anyone know of a Gel Coat Sealant? I love the sealants for my automotive stuff. It is really slick and lasts a long time. If I could only use the sealant once a year I would be in heaven.

Sodar
03-14-2007, 04:11 PM
Buffer: Porter Cable 7424... by far the best tool I have EVER owned!
http://www.northwestpowertools.com/polish/7424.jpg

Pads: For application of Wax, I use a pad imported from Australia. I think it is like $20 for a two pack, but unfortunately, I can not find the name right now. The pads are amazing though and I even noticed that last summer, when I stopped using them because I could not find them, that my boat actually began to get a slight haze from the other pads I was using.

Wax: Everyone has their favorite, and this will turn into a blown out opinion war, but I have used TreWax from West Marine on every boat we have ever owned, stuff is TOUGH!!
http://www.myboatstore.com/prodimages/trewax.gif

TRBenj
03-14-2007, 04:20 PM
Buffing a boat is easy- since the gelcoat is much thicker and harder than automotive paint, its really pretty difficult to do serious damage. For the cost of one professional detail, you can buy all the tools and supplies and be set to do it yourself for years.

I did a lot of research before doing this last year for the first time. I got great results with the Dewalt 849 variable speed rotary buffer, Lake Country pads and 3M products. I had to do quite a bit of wetsanding to get the color of my gelcoat back to where I wanted it, so you may not need to be as aggressive with your choice of product. After sanding, I used the following:

3M Super Duty Compound with a 1" pyle wool pad
3M Imperial Microfinishing Compound with a 1.5" pyle wool pad
3M Finesse-It II Finishing Material (polish) with a wool blend pad

I also used some 3M Imperial Machine Glaze (by hand), but didnt notice much of a difference after the Finesse-It II. Ill probably skip it next time. I followed up with Collinite 925 wax (by hand).

The Super Duty Compound is very aggressive- it can remove 1000 grit scratches. Unless your boat is oxidized, you probably only need to start with the Finesse-It II. Just follow the speed settings recommended on the bottle of each product. Use microfiber towels or applicators to when cleaning up or applying by hand.

Jesus_Freak
03-15-2007, 08:06 AM
3M makes two 9004 super duty compound products, one for paint (39004) and one for gelcoat (09004). I assume it DOES matter which one you use. I accidently bought 39004. Do I need to return it for the gelcoat version? Which did you use?

Buffing a boat is easy- since the gelcoat is much thicker and harder than automotive paint, its really pretty difficult to do serious damage. For the cost of one professional detail, you can buy all the tools and supplies and be set to do it yourself for years.

I did a lot of research before doing this last year for the first time. I got great results with the Dewalt 849 variable speed rotary buffer, Lake Country pads and 3M products. I had to do quite a bit of wetsanding to get the color of my gelcoat back to where I wanted it, so you may not need to be as aggressive with your choice of product. After sanding, I used the following:

3M Super Duty Compound with a 1" pyle wool pad
3M Imperial Microfinishing Compound with a 1.5" pyle wool pad
3M Finesse-It II Finishing Material (polish) with a wool blend pad

I also used some 3M Imperial Machine Glaze (by hand), but didnt notice much of a difference after the Finesse-It II. Ill probably skip it next time. I followed up with Collinite 925 wax (by hand).

The Super Duty Compound is very aggressive- it can remove 1000 grit scratches. Unless your boat is oxidized, you probably only need to start with the Finesse-It II. Just follow the speed settings recommended on the bottle of each product. Use microfiber towels or applicators to when cleaning up or applying by hand.

TRBenj
03-15-2007, 09:55 AM
3M makes two 9004 super duty compound products, one for paint (39004) and one for gelcoat (09004). I assume it DOES matter which one you use. I accidently bought 39004. Do I need to return it for the gelcoat version? Which did you use?

I bought most of my materials (3M products and Lake Country pads) here (http://www.smartshoppersinc.com/waxes-polishes-compounds/waxes-3m.html). Best prices I could find anywhere. The part number they list for the Super Duty compound is 05954. Notice the gallon size has a different part number.

I think youre fine. Im betting 3M uses different part numbers to denote how theyre marketed as well as the size of the bottle. The 39004 says it will remove 1000 grit scratches, so it is likely the same as what I used.

tones03
03-15-2007, 10:41 AM
Ive got a black boat and use Zaino. Best wax for black paint IMO. Looks great with no streaks or anything and very easy to use. I thnk you can only find it online though.

TRBenj
03-15-2007, 10:51 AM
Ive got a black boat and use Zaino. Best wax for black paint IMO. Looks great with no streaks or anything and very easy to use. I thnk you can only find it online though.

I use Zaino on my cars. Remember- our boats arent painted from the factory, they use gelcoat instead. From what Ive read, wax might be the one product you want to use that is marine-specific.

bigmac
03-15-2007, 11:03 AM
I've been impressed with RejeX. It's a thin-film polymer coating. Wipe-on / wipe-off, let it cure for 8-12 hours. It has a higher index of refraction than wax, typically, so it tends to give a deeper color. At least, that's what they say. I have seen measurements using a refractometer that does demonstrate that to be true. However, whether or not it is visibly noticable or just a marketing gimmick, I can't say. My boat looks pretty good with either wax or RejeX on it.

Anyway, index of refraction measurements aside, I am impressed with the way nothing sticks to the boat - bugs, dirt, water spots wipe off with a few swipes of a dry towel.

Jesus_Freak
03-15-2007, 02:20 PM
I bought most of my materials (3M products and Lake Country pads) here (http://www.smartshoppersinc.com/waxes-polishes-compounds/waxes-3m.html). Best prices I could find anywhere. The part number they list for the Super Duty compound is 05954. Notice the gallon size has a different part number.

I think youre fine. Im betting 3M uses different part numbers to denote how theyre marketed as well as the size of the bottle. The 39004 says it will remove 1000 grit scratches, so it is likely the same as what I used.

Yes, I am aware that marketing plays some role in the products (same product, different bottle = more sales), but I wanted to be sure. Anyone on buffing compounds for gelcoat versus paint?

Jesus_Freak
03-15-2007, 02:26 PM
I've been impressed with RejeX. It's a thin-film polymer coating. Wipe-on / wipe-off, let it cure for 8-12 hours. It has a higher index of refraction than wax, typically, so it tends to give a deeper color. At least, that's what they say. I have seen measurements using a refractometer that does demonstrate that to be true. However, whether or not it is visibly noticable or just a marketing gimmick, I can't say. My boat looks pretty good with either wax or RejeX on it....

Refraction measurements depend much on angle, layer thickness (at the nanometer level), environment, etc. It might be good data...just beware (as you mentioned).

H20skeefreek
03-15-2007, 06:22 PM
Yes, I am aware that marketing plays some role in the products (same product, different bottle = more sales), but I wanted to be sure. Anyone on buffing compounds for gelcoat versus paint?
From what I understand, from my training from Mequires and 3M, the products are truely different. Did they train me that way for thier benefit? I have no idea. IF they are different, I would say that a paint product would be fine for fiberglass, but a fiberglass product may not be good for paint. Gelcoat is MUCH tougher than paint.

TRBenj
03-16-2007, 10:49 AM
edit: double post

TRBenj
03-16-2007, 10:50 AM
From what I understand, from my training from Mequires and 3M, the products are truely different. Did they train me that way for thier benefit? I have no idea. IF they are different, I would say that a paint product would be fine for fiberglass, but a fiberglass product may not be good for paint. Gelcoat is MUCH tougher than paint.

There seem to be 2 different schools of thought on both boating/marine and detailing forums on the net as to whether the marine products are truly different.

Youre correct- you want to be much more aggressive on a boat (gelcoat) than you would be on your car (paint), with your choice of both product and pad.

Jesus_Freak
03-16-2007, 02:50 PM
There seem to be 2 different schools of thought on both boating/marine and detailing forums on the net as to whether the marine products are truly different.

Youre correct- you want to be much more aggressive on a boat (gelcoat) than you would be on your car (paint), with your choice of both product and pad.

10-4. Thank you both.