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View Full Version : I need to set up a home based server.....


milkmania
03-08-2007, 09:34 PM
what do I need and where do I start?
I have DSL, wireless network, and XP Pro & Home on various machines.

I hated all that Cisco crap in school, and now it's biting my butt!

this came about because I see that's it's going to take over 30 hours to upload a video to my godaddy webspace:mad:

jimmer2880
03-09-2007, 10:25 AM
what do I need and where do I start?
I have DSL, wireless network, and XP Pro & Home on various machines.

I hated all that Cisco crap in school, and now it's biting my butt!

this came about because I see that's it's going to take over 30 hours to upload a video to my godaddy webspace:mad:

what kind of home based server? what are you trying to serve from your home?

milkmania
03-09-2007, 10:32 AM
what kind of home based server? what are you trying to serve from your home?

under terms of my paroll, I'm not allowed to say;)

bigmac
03-09-2007, 11:03 AM
what do I need and where do I start?
I have DSL, wireless network, and XP Pro & Home on various machines.

I hated all that Cisco crap in school, and now it's biting my butt!

this came about because I see that's it's going to take over 30 hours to upload a video to my godaddy webspace:mad:

You'll need to review your bandwidth, transfer allowances, synchronicity (upload/download speeds) and whether or not you have (or want) a static IP. I would most definitely recommend a linux-based server. Simplest way to do what you want is using ClarkConnect (http://www.clarkconnect.com/info/), IMHO. The Community Edition is free and downloadable as an ISO.

Leroy
03-09-2007, 12:41 PM
30 hours! that is a lot of video!

The world isn't friendly yet for home servers, mostly due to having to get a fixed IP address. I expect as IPv6 launches then we will all have fixed servers and our very own website.

bigmac
03-09-2007, 02:00 PM
30 hours! that is a lot of video!

The world isn't friendly yet for home servers, mostly due to having to get a fixed IP address. I expect as IPv6 launches then we will all have fixed servers and our very own website.

I'm kind of a dunce about Linux but I was still able to set up a Clark box without much difficulty. It doesn't take much hardware - I just used an old AT computer I had sitting around. All I had to do to it was load the Clark software and add two network cards so I could also accomodate my home network. That Clark box then acted as a server, but also a rock-solid firewall. My connection was still DHCP (static costs too muchstill), which could be problematic from a convenience standpoint, but I do note that many cable companies that are still DHCP rarely change the IP address anymore. AFAIK, mine hasn't changed in almost a year despite a number of cable modem resets.

andrewtimko
03-09-2007, 03:01 PM
You mentioned you have various machines, including an XP Pro box. I'd dedicate that box to my web server and add IIS to it. Total setup would be 5 minutes. I'd partition out the hdd, or even add another, and point IIS to its own partition (not the root). I would put the web server on its own subnet seperate from your home machines (i.e. a DMZ situation). Some of the lower end linksys/netgear routers natively support DMZs. Then you could completely avoid Cisco's CLI.

Without a static IP no will be OK, just use a dynamic dns services like DYNDNS or NO-IP.com They run a utility that reports back your routable IP at intervals to update DNS resolutions on the cloud.