PDA

View Full Version : Single vs Dual Axle


jakethebt
02-28-2007, 05:17 PM
What is the criteria for choosing a single vs dual axle trailer? I have seen a bunch of X2s for sale with both types. Why?

Andyg
02-28-2007, 05:20 PM
With something like the X2 were the weight can be handled by a single axle it comes down to most likely two things. First being how far and how much you trailer. The dual axle trailer will trailer better than a single axle. The second is personal preference, ie looks.

east tx skier
02-28-2007, 05:21 PM
The third is moving the trailer around in the garage or by hand, which with a dual axle is not an easy task.

ProTour X9
02-28-2007, 05:22 PM
Yes, tandem axle trailers are great for traveling places, but harder to spin around in a barn/garage.

dsoby
02-28-2007, 05:22 PM
PRICE!
That being said... I used to have a boat by another manufacturer with a single axle and trailered a lot. My MC dual axle is much more stable at highway speeds. I really can't feel it while driving at interstate speeds. Most people complain about the lack of maneuverability by hand in tight spaces but this is not that much of a problem.

Harvey
02-28-2007, 05:23 PM
The single is enough but make sure YOU GET THE SPARE!!!! Like eastie said it moves by hand easier and backs a little easier but it is not so nice when trailering, especially at speed. I went with the dual axle this time and it is so nice when I trailer it above 40 mph.

ilikeitglacy
02-28-2007, 05:29 PM
single axle can support apprx. 3500pounds, small Mc (ps197) weigh about 2500pd, add on fuel and ski stuff and you get pretty close to the max load.Now if you trailer long distance it putts more stress on the axel. If you get a bigger boat, you will load and stress even more that poor single axle.

east tx skier
02-28-2007, 05:33 PM
You guys with the Vdrives, do you think they a little less stable at highway speeds because of the engine location? Our old I/O was no fun to trailer, but the 205 on a single axle is a nonissue at highway speeds. Just curious.

Diesel
02-28-2007, 05:37 PM
single axle can support apprx. 3500pounds, small Mc (ps197) weigh about 2500pd, add on fuel and ski stuff and you get pretty close to the max load.Now if you trailer long distance it putts more stress on the axel. If you get a bigger boat, you will load and stress even more that poor single axle.

Not true. MC uses 5200# axles now for their singles. I will never own a tandem. Both my Dorsey singles tow(ed) like a dream and are very easy to manuver in the garage and around town. With my boat there is no need for a tandem.

BrianM
02-28-2007, 05:42 PM
You guys with the Vdrives, do you think they a little less stable at highway speeds because of the engine location? Our old I/O was no fun to trailer, but the 205 on a single axle is a nonissue at highway speeds. Just curious.

I wonder as well. The single under my 190 tows perfect. Straight as an arrow, no wiggle, no bounce nothing. Not even at 80mph. Can't really see how a dual would town any better with the exception of a tire blow out. In my case a dual would be a pain since I always have to manuver and back in very tight spaces.

shepherd
02-28-2007, 05:48 PM
Duals are more expensive, both in purchase price and maintenance/repair. 4 tires vs. 2. 4 bearings vs. 2. Worse gas mileage. I've only used single axle trailers and never had a problem with them, including very long trips at highway speeds. Sure, dual axle trailers are probably more stable. But you can make your boat more stable in the water too by making it wider. And it would be a pig.

I would also assume that if Mastercraft didn't believe single axle trailers were safe, they wouldn't sell them for liablility reasons.

jraben8
02-28-2007, 05:58 PM
Not true. MC uses 5200# axles now for their singles. I will never own a tandem. Both my Dorsey singles tow(ed) like a dream and are very easy to manuver in the garage and around town. With my boat there is no need for a tandem.

I have to agree. My Dorsey trailer is by far the best trailer that I have owned (all have been single axle). I'm sure that it helps that my loaded boat probably weighs no more than 3300# too. It is absolutely solid.

Maristar210
02-28-2007, 06:03 PM
You guys with the Vdrives, do you think they a little less stable at highway speeds because of the engine location? Our old I/O was no fun to trailer, but the 205 on a single axle is a nonissue at highway speeds. Just curious.

I trailer my V drive to and from the dealer 20 miles each way in the spring and fall only. Otherwise its trailered 500 yards from my garage to the water (waiting for a slip)

Anyways mine tracks dead straight at 75 MPH and it IS A SINGLE axle FWIW.

BOL - Steve

Andyg
02-28-2007, 06:20 PM
The lake I usually ski on is an hour drive from home so I put on plenty of miles on my trailer. I have a single axle trailer and it has always felt rock solid going down the interstate at 75 mph.

JohnE
02-28-2007, 06:29 PM
I have a tandem with my tristar and naturally it tows beautifully. I am getting a single with my new 197 in a few weeks from MYMC as some of you know. Mike assured me that it will tow great. The only reason I can see for a tandem is a heavier boat. It is comforting to hear the positive comments about the single axle, though.

I have a utility trailer that we use to transport our scissor lift. It is rated for 6600 lbs and only has a single axle. I bought it from a rental company that my friend owns. They used it regulary for lifts approaching that limit. I think the single axles are getting a bad rap. The tandems do look a lot nicer, though.

Gozar
02-28-2007, 06:42 PM
Topics on the Internet like this turn into "what I have is best".

I have been around trailers for all of my life. There are pros and cons to both single and dual axle.

Anyone telling you that a single trailers better than a dual isn't thinking it all the way through. Physics dictates it will trailer better and my personal experience is that they tow better.

They also have built in redundancy for flat tires. If you are worried about maintenance cost on a trailer you sure as heck shouldn't be buying a boat!!! :uglyhamme

Singles are very maneuverable especially by hand. They can hold a good amount of weight regardless of what the "duals or die" crowd say.

Gozar
02-28-2007, 06:46 PM
Oh, and this is less likely to happen to you with a dual. :D

19242

Leroy
02-28-2007, 06:53 PM
I don't have any issues. THey can adjust where the boat sits on the trailer so the weight on the tongue is adjusted to be the same regardless.

You guys with the Vdrives, do you think they a little less stable at highway speeds because of the engine location? Our old I/O was no fun to trailer, but the 205 on a single axle is a nonissue at highway speeds. Just curious.

Andyg
02-28-2007, 07:06 PM
Anyone telling you that a single trailers better than a dual isn't thinking it all the way through. Physics dictates it will trailer better and my personal experience is that they tow better.




Gozar,
I don't think anyone on here actually said that there single axle trailered better than a dual axle, just that MC makes a good trailing single axle trailer. I also think that people are trying to let everyone know that you don't need a dual axle trailer to put a lot of miles on and cruise at 75 mph down the interstate, the single axle will handle it just fine.

Andyg

Chief
02-28-2007, 07:20 PM
What is the criteria for choosing a single vs dual axle trailer? I have seen a bunch of X2s for sale with both types. Why?

I have a single and when I see the tires compress when the boat starts to bounce I cross my fingers that they don't blow. In my opinion a dual axle would give me a better piece of mind, but for now I'm single axle. Maybe a higher load rating for the tires?

Yes the air pressure is right.

Doug G
02-28-2007, 07:27 PM
I used a very complicated selection criteria... the dual came with the boat. Ummm ok good enough for me. Thankfully not an issue for consideration. Tows beautifully on the highway.

ProTour X9
02-28-2007, 07:36 PM
In our case a dual axle would cost more, because our boat also was on a tandem axle, they would have had to switch it with another one:D

wgwollet
02-28-2007, 07:59 PM
Wow.....daul axles are a must for any boat above 3,000 lbs. I had single and dual axels. And by far the dual is better.......if you have a smaller boat under 20 feet and less then 3,000 lbs a single is OK. But even then its a load. The dual pulls so much better and the extra tires and bearings is no big deal. Just look at what MC recommends and its fine. But if the boat is border line go dual its worth the extra dough. I fine dual trailers back up much better then single because the single pivots on two tires and just a little stering wheel adjustment makes alot of difference.

pm66
02-28-2007, 11:44 PM
I went with the tandem on my X2, I've had a blow out before on my other boat, trust me it sucks even with dual wheels. Another problem I had is the water level dropping and having to back the trailer in as far as I could to get the boat back on the trailer, I'm not sure of the axle placement compared to a single, but I would guess the front axle would be located closer to the front of the trailer on the tandem, which allowed me to go deeper, as the rear wheel was off the ramp?
Paul

cbryan70
03-01-2007, 12:43 AM
I have a single and pulled it from south carolina to illinois....only almost went off the road once through the mountains. Have to remember my boat is MAYBE 2000 pounds on a good day. Trailers great at highway speed

sizzler
03-01-2007, 03:13 AM
i have had 3 boats with single-axle trailers...all have trailered really well...but none of them were as heavy as my X9....i was always consious of losing a bearing/wheel when i was travelling and the damage it might cause to my boat/trailer other vehicles......the ease that they manoevered around the lot was great.........when i ordered my X9, i wanted the twin-axle as i would be trailering the boat further than i had with the others,at speed as well......after chatting to my dealer , and the possibility of me leaving the ballast in the boat, i decided on the twin-axle......i have never looked back(pun intended);) .i am very confident of its integrity when i am towing(70mph)...its ability to go on 3 wheeels(never tested,dont want to)......it is a small pain to turn it in its length by hand.......but i have willing friends who are only too happy to help....

this is only my opinion......take it as you will

ProTour X9
03-01-2007, 08:28 AM
Oh did I say dual I meant SINGLE :uglyhamme :uglyhamme :uglyhamme :uglyhamme

Sodar
03-01-2007, 08:42 AM
Here in Southern California, the local dealerships use the MC trailers, but the biggest significance that I notice is that 99% of the trailers at the dealership are tandem axle. It seems the majority of the boats for sale, east of here are on single axles, unless they are v-drives. I am guessing that it is because most lakes are located 300 miles from Los Angeles and you need to go through arid desert to get there! None the less, I have gotten so accustomed to a tandem axle trailer that I would never own a boat without one. Even on my PS190, the tandem axle tows much smoother, with less feedback than our old "X-brand" on a single axle trailer. I guess the only downside I can think of is trying to crank the trailer into the garage and other tight spaces! It is a trade-off for sure. I however will gladly pay the extra money for two more tires, wheels and bearings for the added assurance that if I have a tire or bearing failure at 60mph, my baby will not flip over, have catastophic damage to it or even worse cause a much larger accident that would result in personal injury! Just my :twocents:

sully
03-01-2007, 10:04 PM
I have had both with v-drive's, single axel with maristar 210 and now a dual axels with our 215. Both have been great, both trailer straight.
The dual axels does seem to stop quicker with the extra brakes.
Just my :twocents:

Leroy
03-01-2007, 10:38 PM
Seems like more and more the tandems are taking over. Much better performance towing all the way around.

Here in Southern California, the local dealerships use the MC trailers, but the biggest significance that I notice is that 99% of the trailers at the dealership are tandem axle. It seems the majority of the boats for sale, east of here are on single axles, unless they are v-drives. I am guessing that it is because most lakes are located 300 miles from Los Angeles and you need to go through arid desert to get there! None the less, I have gotten so accustomed to a tandem axle trailer that I would never own a boat without one. Even on my PS190, the tandem axle tows much smoother, with less feedback than our old "X-brand" on a single axle trailer. I guess the only downside I can think of is trying to crank the trailer into the garage and other tight spaces! It is a trade-off for sure. I however will gladly pay the extra money for two more tires, wheels and bearings for the added assurance that if I have a tire or bearing failure at 60mph, my baby will not flip over, have catastophic damage to it or even worse cause a much larger accident that would result in personal injury! Just my :twocents:

A.I. Rider
03-02-2007, 07:54 AM
My old I/O was much more difficult to trailer than my V-drive. Why that is, I do not know. I do know that my tandem on my X2 is extremely stable, even running at fast speeds. I have never had it even feel as if it were getting loose behind me. I opted for the tandem and am glad that I did. I also trailer the boat everywhere I go.

PaulW
03-02-2007, 08:13 AM
I have put over 20,000 miles on a tandem and I was glad that I had it. My old boat 01 X30 is 3300 lbs and the new X2 is around 3500 lbs. I couldn't imagine that heavy of a boat on just two tires. Not saying that it couldn't handle it, but I agree anything over 3000 lbs would do better on a tandem. If you're just going down the street to launch it and leave it on the lift for the year, than go with the single.
I also trailer the boat everywhere I go as well. I have experienced the back wheels being off the ramp and the front ones still on the ramp. It was nice to have 4 wheels in those situations.
It is a pain to move around in the drive though.

fbatwork
03-02-2007, 03:11 PM
If you do not do a significant amount of towing a single axle is fine - axles are not all created equal - when the manufacture is configuring a single axle trailer they put the appropriate axle under it - whether it is a 2000 lb load or 5000 lb. The axle is centered under the load so that the tongue weight is similar to a tandem.

That being said if you do a lot of highway driving the tandem gives you several benefits that are not available from a single.

Additional brakeing power if set up with brakes on both axles.
Additional safety if you have a bearing failure or flat tire.

Consider how much driving you do with your boat and purchase (if possible) based on your needs.

Jerseydave
03-02-2007, 06:20 PM
I've had 8 boat trailers, 3 were singles and 5 were tandems.

The tandems do track better with less "sway", and braking is better with 4 wheels stopping vs. 2 wheels.

I think you're okay with a single axle as long as you don't exceed the max gross weight. Don't forget to account for fuel, gear and the weight of the trailer too.

Anything over 3000# and/or long distance towing, I'd go for a tandem.

stuie
03-02-2007, 06:54 PM
I towed my new to me '94 Prostar 205 from Memphis TN to Toronto Canada 15hrs. straight driving at 85mph on a single axle trailer, no problems

Stuart

FoggyNogginz
03-03-2007, 01:56 PM
I have a single axle under a 205 and it has no worries at all. I tow about 120 miles round trip every weekend too. I agree about the engine location making a big difference though. My old I/O would bounce around like mad on a single axle and it drove me nuts, but the 205 inboard does not even move. One thing to note regarding bounce is that the trailer springs can wear out after a while if your boat sits on the trailer a lot for storage, but this will eventually happen regardless of single/tandem axle. My last set of springs lasted a decade though!

KC

FoggyNogginz
03-03-2007, 01:56 PM
I have a single axle under a 205 and it has no worries at all. I tow about 120 miles round trip every weekend too. I agree about the engine location making a big difference though. My old I/O would bounce around like mad on a single axle and it drove me nuts, but the 205 inboard does not even move. One thing to note regarding bounce is that the trailer springs can wear out after a while if your boat sits on the trailer a lot for storage, but this will eventually happen regardless of single/tandem axle. My last set of springs lasted a decade though!

KC

Bruce
03-04-2007, 02:53 PM
Lots of opinions but no one has had a "temper tandem" yet. Ouch!

bigmac
03-04-2007, 04:28 PM
You guys with the Vdrives, do you think they a little less stable at highway speeds because of the engine location? Our old I/O was no fun to trailer, but the 205 on a single axle is a nonissue at highway speeds. Just curious.

No, engine location won't make any difference in trailer handling. If someone has trouble with trailer stability then the trailer isn't set up right.

Trailer handling is all about tongue weight and its relationship to trailer weight. If you buy an aftermarket boat trailer, your first job will be to adjust bunks, winch post, and axle locations so that with your boat on there, you have no less than 10% and no more than 15% of the trailer's total weight on the tongue at the ball hitch. One might assume that MasterCraft figured that out since their trailers are supposedly custom designed for each boat model. I wasn't so confident, so I checked with my trusty Sherline scale (http://www.sherlinedirect.com/merchant.cfm?pid=169&step=4) and a trip to the scales at the local landfill. It was right on.

http://www.sherlinedirect.com/prodimg/lmpicm.jpg

You don't have to use a Sherline scale, you can use a bathroom scale, although it's a little more cumbersome...

http://www.towingtown.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/html/tw_250.jpg

WTRSK1R
03-04-2007, 05:09 PM
I will not argue that a dual axle will give you peace of mind, but I went through two sets of tires on the single axle trailer for my 205 because we took it on so many trips, and never had any issues. I pull it with an Explorer, and hardly even knew it was back there when we traveling. We pulled it from Wisconsin completely around Lake Michigan on several trips since we have family in the Lower Pennisula of Michigan, and sometimes we go through Chicago on the way there, and through the Upper Pennisula on the way back. The single axle MC trailer tows very nicely.

I have a single axle on my 197 as well.


Steve

JohnE
03-04-2007, 05:20 PM
I have a few 120 - 150 mile trips planned for this year, and will probably do more. I have confidence that the single axle under my new 197 will be perfectly fine.

I'll report back in May.;)

stevo137
03-04-2007, 05:28 PM
I have had both and the single would be my choice...

Footin
03-04-2007, 07:16 PM
Singles fine for me, cheeper to maintain.

PendO
03-04-2007, 07:21 PM
tandem ... with push button 8 wheel drive and electric brakes

bmargol
03-04-2007, 08:03 PM
Just buy a lake house and no need to trailer.
single axel is just as good and much easier to manuver

FrankSchwab
03-04-2007, 11:56 PM
I've got a single under my v-drive '98 Maristar 200 VRS, and have no problems towing 300 miles to Lake Powell or 200 miles to Lake Havasu. I will say one good thing for the dual-axles - going over speed bumps in a parking lot is easier with a dually than a single.

/frank

curtisco24
03-05-2007, 11:30 AM
I had a mc single under an x1 for about three days, before the studs shattered, busting the hub, and sending the wheel flying across the road. That is not real fun at 50 mph. MC replaced the trailer with a tandem, but did not want to admit there was a problem. Several employees I talked to said there was a big problem with the singles in the early 2000's but they thought they had it fixed. Also was told there were several singles that broke last year. Mostly seemed to be the v-drive boats. Anything over 2500 lbs. needs to be on a tandem in my opinion, even if the axle is rated at 5200, the wheels tires and other hardware can't handle it.

JohnE
03-05-2007, 12:31 PM
Just buy a lake house and no need to trailer.


Working on that.;)

So far, though, all I have to put toward it is the $1000 I saved on the trailer.:D

JohnE
05-15-2007, 12:25 AM
I have a few 120 - 150 mile trips planned for this year, and will probably do more. I have confidence that the single axle under my new 197 will be perfectly fine.

I'll report back in May.;)

May's here! Just did 880 miles back from NC. The single axle towed unbelievabley well. Aside from the fact that the tandems do look a lot nicer, I can't see any reason for one under a prostar. I think I prefer the single, it does maneuver a lot easier than the tandem I had under the tristar. But I know this is a question where everyone has their own opinion, I'm not trying to rehash the debate.

jeverett
05-15-2007, 01:31 AM
Like most have said It comes down to personal pref. I have a 190 with a tandem, tows like a dream but is a b#@# to manuver in the garage.

shepherd
05-15-2007, 08:00 AM
Like most have said It comes down to personal pref. I have a 190 with a tandem, tows like a dream but is a b#@# to manuver in the garage.

That's my biggest complaint with the tandem under my new boat. I could easily roll my 190 with the single around in the garage. I would even roll it out of the garage by hand up to the truck. The 197 with the tandem is nearly impossible to move around, so I need some extra-special truck/boat maneuvering skills when I back it into the garage.

Also, while the tandem seemed more stable on the highway, there was a noticeable increase in drag that I don't think was entirely due to the greater weight of the boat. Those trailers are heavy, and 2 extra wheels on the pavement naturally create more drag.

Finally, as I said before, now I'm faced with twice as many wheels, tires, and bearings that I need to maintain.

If I had my choice, I'd go single axle.

limegreen
05-15-2007, 11:51 AM
Anybody who prefers a single axle hasn't had a highway catastrophe. I have.

My 2003 X9 was on a single axle MC trailer. They had trouble in that year; wheels not mating to the hub correctly.

Wheel and tire came off at 70mph. It was the fourth of July in my rear view.

I now own a custom tandem and am WAY less stressed. Bottom line is that with a tandem if you have a problem, you still have a chance.

Did I mention my custom tandem cost half the cost of the MC version and is WAY nicer: powdercoat, lower, fold away tongue, LED's, rear hitch, guides, prop guard, stainless fenders, the works.

My opinion, of course.:D

Thrall
05-15-2007, 01:06 PM
One advantage of a tandem is you don't actually have th change a tire or bearing if you have a blowout or smoke a bearing. You can chain up the bad wheel and run single on one side.
Was real convienent when I had the old tires on my trlr. Lost one tire on the way to the lake, chained it up so as not to waste valuable ski time early in the morning. Put the spare on after we were done for the day.
Made it 5 mi on the spare (now I know why it was the spare, had a chunk of rubber missing that I didn't see when I bought the boat).
Chained up a wheel again, drove to the only tire shop that was open at 5pm on a Sunday, got a tire.
Got about 2 mi from home, ran over an unavoidable mess of nails in the road (only lost one trailer tire, the new one!), chained it up again, went home and started drinking heavily.
Next day, started calling around for new tires!

River Rat
05-15-2007, 02:56 PM
Like this:o We got the boat in the water and trailer back to the house for repairs

6ballsisall
05-15-2007, 03:24 PM
Anybody who prefers a single axle hasn't had a highway catastrophe. I have.

My 2003 X9 was on a single axle MC trailer. They had trouble in that year; wheels not mating to the hub correctly.

Wheel and tire came off at 70mph. It was the fourth of July in my rear view.

I now own a custom tandem and am WAY less stressed. Bottom line is that with a tandem if you have a problem, you still have a chance.

Did I mention my custom tandem cost half the cost of the MC version and is WAY nicer: powdercoat, lower, fold away tongue, LED's, rear hitch, guides, prop guard, stainless fenders, the works.

My opinion, of course.:D


Dang!!! I bet you had to buy a new drivers seat for your tow rig too!!! Do you have any pics of the carnage??? Hopefully no one was injured.

rstitson
05-15-2007, 04:30 PM
I have a single on a 17+ ft glastron and a dual on the 21+ mastercraft. Both tow well but the tandem is more stable. As far a manuveralbe, I notice little difference except that the tandem is smoother and predictable. I do not store in a garage during summer so do not move it by hand. I do feel much more confident with the dual. As the single has no brakes, the dual stops much better even with the extra weight.

kentsmith12
05-15-2007, 10:06 PM
I have owned both - i'll never go back to single...

limegreen
05-16-2007, 03:24 PM
Dang!!! I bet you had to buy a new drivers seat for your tow rig too!!! Do you have any pics of the carnage??? Hopefully no one was injured.

No injuries. I have some photos but I don't know how to post. Boat was ok except for a rubber mark. Trailer didn't fair so well.

atlfootr
05-16-2007, 07:05 PM
No injuries.
I have some photos but I don't know how to post.View FAQ's ... posting photos.

atlfootr
05-16-2007, 07:09 PM
I will not argue that a dual axle will give you peace of mind, but I went through two sets of tires on the single axle trailer for my 205 because we took it on so many trips, and never had any issues.You must'a had a cheaper brand, always use GOODYEARS!

P-hat_in_Cincy
05-16-2007, 08:44 PM
I have owned 2 MC's (X10 & 205V) and both were single axles. I readily admit I'd rather have dual axles, just for the redundancy. It is an added stressor when I'm towing long distance knowing I don't have a limp home capability if something were to happen to one of the axles.

jmkshm101
05-17-2007, 08:55 AM
I have owned both and the tandem is great for its redundancy (did actually blow a tire once) but the single is easier to move around. I too have trailered my X1 from FL to NC w/ no problems and drive it around the mountains here. The tandem is nice if you are going long distances quite frequently, but if you don't the single should be fine. I love the fact that I can move the boat around in my garage by myself very easily w/ the single.

limegreen
05-21-2007, 05:51 PM
I can't see anywhere someone mentioned the LOOK!! Isn't that pretty important to many of us??

The tandem just LOOKS right.

cg

lawless1
09-28-2007, 01:17 PM
Anybody who prefers a single axle hasn't had a highway catastrophe. I have.

My 2003 X9 was on a single axle MC trailer. They had trouble in that year; wheels not mating to the hub correctly.

Wheel and tire came off at 70mph. It was the fourth of July in my rear view.

I now own a custom tandem and am WAY less stressed. Bottom line is that with a tandem if you have a problem, you still have a chance.

Did I mention my custom tandem cost half the cost of the MC version and is WAY nicer: powdercoat, lower, fold away tongue, LED's, rear hitch, guides, prop guard, stainless fenders, the works.

My opinion, of course.:D

Limegreen:

I have to replace my single axle MC trailer (lost the wheel and leaf springs). I am going through the dual vs single debate myself. I have been quoted about $6500 for a delivered single from MC. Cope, which is a large MC dealership in the West, uses Sport Boat Trailers and they have quited me about $5000 for a dual axle (but I will have to drive about 275 miles to pick it up). It is an insurance claim either way but I am leaning towards the dual because of stability plus what I just went through with a single (by the way I have a 210 Maristar). I would go with a dual MC trailer but then I would be outside of my insurance coverage due to the price of the MC trailers.

Question for you - where did you get your trailer from?
Question for other MC owners (especially any that purchased from Cope with a SBT trailer - how do you like the SBT trailer?

beatle78
09-28-2007, 01:22 PM
Not true. MC uses 5200# axles now for their singles. I will never own a tandem. Both my Dorsey singles tow(ed) like a dream and are very easy to manuver in the garage and around town. With my boat there is no need for a tandem.

I'm not sure the brand, but I had a single axle with my BU and it towed like a corvette even at 90mph.

I don't tow anymore with the lake in my backyard so it's a non-issue.

mccobmd
09-28-2007, 01:27 PM
I have had both, I only trailer and agree with the weight issue that the axle is rarely the issue. I got a trailer dolly and can move my dual as easily as my old single.

mccobmd
09-28-2007, 01:28 PM
I had the option of MC or Dorsey trailer and went with the Dorsey.

Roonie's
09-28-2007, 01:32 PM
Have the single and towed this summer over 4000 miles on it without a problem on a new 2007 X2. I was a little concerned about it on our long road trip we took this summer driving halfway across the US. It towed well the whole way. The only reason I would get a tandem would be for blowout coverage. The wheels and tires on my trailer are the same size as my old truck so I think it can handle the load. Also single axle is now 5200 # rating. Also getting into my garage is a pain and a very sharp corner so a tandem would be difficult.

ride
09-28-2007, 01:39 PM
Just flopping my ears into this discussion now, but after owning both tandem and single, I'd vote tandem for sure. Defininately the safety factor of a tandem is a huge advantage in case of blowout, bearing burn-out, or heaven forbid the hand-tightened lugnut cases when returning from the tire store. I also found backing the single axle to be a bit of a pain (it reacted a little too quick for my longbed supercab). Also, if you've ever launched/trailered a single axle from a beach thats a little soft, just plan on needing another truck and towstrap for assistance to dig out (it's a simple factor of weight distrubution that gives the tandem an advantage in soft terrain). And last but not least, I'm with Limegreen on the look. I prefer the look of the tandem over the single as to me the look of the single axle can cheapen the appearance somewhat. IMO, on bigger MC's it can make them appear smaller and overburdensome to the trailer. Again, I've owned both so I'm not bagging, just stating MY preference...

trickskier
09-28-2007, 01:40 PM
You guys with the Vdrives, do you think they a little less stable at highway speeds because of the engine location? Our old I/O was no fun to trailer, but the 205 on a single axle is a nonissue at highway speeds. Just curious.
My X-1 is on a Tandem Axle trailer...........I pull it at 75 MPH all the time with no issues.

ride
09-28-2007, 02:29 PM
Limegreen:
Question for you - where did you get your trailer from?


Not to hijack this from Limegreen, but to add to your options, if you're west of MS, you might get a quote from a trailer manufacturer in Salt Lake called Metalcraft. When I was thinking about a dual-conversion for my single axle, my dealer recommended them for the job. I never followed thru, as the increased price of the tandem OEM fiberglass fender upgrade deflated my ambition, but I know they manufacture complete trailers for other boat co's and look pretty well built. They can also upgrade a single axle MC trailer to dual and save you money if you use their steel fenders. I declined as I prefer the look of the OEM fiberglass fender...

ride
09-28-2007, 05:58 PM
Just flopping my ears into this discussion now, but after owning both tandem and single, I'd vote tandem for sure. Defininately the safety factor of a tandem is a huge advantage in case of blowout, bearing burn-out, or heaven forbid the hand-tightened lugnut cases when returning from the tire store. I also found backing the single axle to be a bit of a pain (it reacted a little too quick for my longbed supercab). Also, if you've ever launched/trailered a single axle from a beach thats a little soft, just plan on needing another truck and towstrap for assistance to dig out (it's a simple factor of weight distrubution that gives the tandem an advantage in soft terrain). And last but not least, I'm with Limegreen on the look. I prefer the look of the tandem over the single as to me the look of the single axle can cheapen the appearance somewhat. IMO, on bigger MC's it can make them appear smaller and overburdensome to the trailer. Again, I've owned both so I'm not bagging, just stating MY preference...

**on edit and to add one more thought** Although I prefer the tandem trailer, after reading members that list the "added advantage" of having brakes on both axles, I respectfully disagree that it really makes much of a difference on that trailer. If adjusted properly, the MC single-axle braking system is easily sufficient for the weight of these boats. And, having brakes on both axles of the tandem, while being pretty cool, is way overkill. I regularly pull loaded horse trailers weighing 10,k + lbs with brakes on the rear axle only that are as responsive as my MC tandem when braking. IMO, unless your pulling something like the X80, the additional brakes on that front axle of the tandem give little advantage over their added maintenance. ...and, please, for those of us who take pride in the MC name, I can imagine few worse sights than seeing an X80 going down the road on a single axle trailer:D

surfacetension
09-28-2007, 06:14 PM
I took deliver of my X2 on a single trailer and ordered a double. I'm towing with the single and Don't like it. It's too bouncy!! all my boats had doubles and I tow ALL the time. Plus the blowout thing. The one plus for the single is moving it around, but I'm a double Guy for sure

lav
09-28-2007, 06:20 PM
Oh, and this is less likely to happen to you with a dual. :D

19242
Techniclly wouldn't be twice as likely?

Roonie's
09-28-2007, 06:27 PM
I'm towing with the single and Don't like it. It's too bouncy!!


I agree with you the X2 does bounce on a single.

skihard111
09-28-2007, 10:30 PM
Just towed a 209 on a single axle...can you believe it 1800 miles.......It tracked great and didnt sway or give any problems at all. I kept it at 75 or less.